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Old 10-03-2009, 08:39 AM   #11
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stuff like rice, crackers, etc is dry -

if you put an orange and a cracker on the table and leave them, which will spoil?

stuff like relish etc tends to the high acid side - which tends to help "preserve" them.

you can do what you're thinking - divide up a big can into smaller volumes, but it's not likely that vacuum sealing them will give you any (notable) longer storage than just plain ole "covered in the fridge."

vegetables will go bad before fruits in syrup (sugar is another 'preservative')

vacuum sealing reduces the amount of oxygen/moisture inside the package environment - less oxygen, fats don't 'oxidize'/go rancid, cookies taste better longer.

less oxygen/moisture barrier around meats (for example) generates less freezer burn / discoloration - but it's still the freezing part that "preserves" not the vacuum...
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Old 10-03-2009, 09:29 AM   #12
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yep, what Dilbert said...
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Old 10-03-2009, 09:56 AM   #13
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As I previously stated, refrigeration is fine, just as it is for any food item. Vacuum sealing will extend that storage period for awhile (not long term) because you are removing the air. That's the whole purpose of the FoodSaver.

High-acid foods (lots of acid in them) and those with sugar (not artificial) will last even longer because their environment tends to inhibit bacteria growth. Common sense prevails.

I've transferred some items from a #10 can before, mostly pickles that I go through rather quickly, but there really isn't that much of a savings and the risk of contamination over time is fairly high because you are dealing with an open container of food -- the fact that you transfer it to sterile jars does not change the fact that it has been exposed to the air and bacteria that will grow over time.
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Old 10-07-2009, 12:40 PM   #14
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Thanks Everyone for your input. I decided to play it safe. I bought the portion size cans. Like mentioned the cost difference between the #10 cans and going to the Emergency Room is not going to save me money in the long run. The dry stuff I can use the canning jars to keep out bugs. Other items I buy in bulk will just go in the freezer.

Thanks again,
Henry
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Old 10-10-2009, 08:58 PM   #15
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Just going through cabinets and checking dates. Curious about several cans of Tomatoes and tomato paste I found dating back to June 2008
The cans say "Best buy that date" I know they are not an expensive items. The cans are in excellent condition, no rust or dents. Should I toss these or do you think they are still nutritious?

It is not the expense as it is minimal, but I was brought up never to waste anything and has stayed with me to a fault over the years.
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Old 10-10-2009, 09:06 PM   #16
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Ask that question again in about 3-4 years. One year is minimal and the tomatoes are fine. The tomato paste does tend to darken with age however.
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Old 11-02-2009, 09:33 PM   #17
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I know it's been awhile since anyone has posted on this topic but I'm very new here so please bear with me.

Correct me if I am wrong but perishables such as fruits, veg etc can potentially be high risk food items. Dry goods such as crackers and rice (uncooked) if kept dry can potentially keep for longer. More so rice than crackers I would think.

I agree with you on the saving money and health & safety is the primary concern. Maybe buying fresh and dehydrating or canning from scratch would be best if you do not prefer to buy smaller portions of canned food from a grocery store.

I am very interested in this topic as well I a have been cooking and baking for a long time and all this canning info is so new to me its scary. I mean botulism?? Eek! Definately worth reading about. Never hurts to have some extra food around with all the predictions we have been having anyways.

I hope you found some answers by now.
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