"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Farm to Table > Canning and Preserving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-28-2008, 12:26 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6
Questions about Canning Mulberry Juice

Hi all,
I'm a newbie at canning. I have some questions about Mulberry Juice. I previously canned 10 quarts, by cooking the mulberrys & straining them, then in a water bath canner for 15 min. I added 1 cup sugar to 1 gallon mulberry juice. I read this somewhere, I don't remember where. It's very tasty stuff & fine as far as that goes. But everytime I read a Mulberry jelly recipe it's says to add lemon juice.

So, I'm wondering is the stuff I canned already O.K. without the lemon juice? If I should add lemon juice, how much to a quart would I add? Any reason to add more sugar? It tastes good to me, but to be safe for canning purposes. To be on the safe side, should I boil it for 10 mins before I drink the stuff already canned? Read somewhere that would kill botulism.

Sorry for the million & one questions, I can find load of recipes for jams & jellies, but none so far on mulberry juice.

Thanks in advance for any advice!!

__________________

__________________
phoebe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2008, 03:03 PM   #2
Head Chef
 
mcnerd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 1,326
Okay, I'm a little confused. Were you making "juice" or "Jelly"?

The lemon juice is an optional addition to increase the acidity of the fruit to help in the preservation since some fruits are lower acidity than others. You would need to research Mulberry's to find out how acidic they are. It "could" affect the long-term storage of the jars, especially since you used very little sugar in your recipe.

If you were just making "juice", most generic recipes for fruit juices should work with the Mulberry Juice.

If you were attempting to make "jelly", I would like to know the recipe you were working from and what kind of pectin you used, if any.
__________________

__________________
Support bacteria. It's the only culture some people have.
mcnerd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2008, 03:24 PM   #3
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6
No, I was just making juice. The closest thing I could find to Mulberry juice was a Berry Juice in the Ball Blue Book for Boysenberry, Loganberry, Raspberry, etc. That says add 1 to 2 cups of sugar for each gallon of juice.

The only reason I mentioned jelly was because those were the mulberry recipes I could find & they all mention lemon. So, that's why I was concerned about the acidity.

If I were to add lemon just to be safe how much would you advise adding per quart? I have a lot more to do & want to make sure that I get these right. Since, I just did those 2 days ago, I could reprocess them with lemon juice added, to be safe.

According to this site: fresh mulberries are very acidic List of Alkaline Foods - High Alkaline Food Diet

Sorry for so many questions, i just want to make sure everything is OK.
__________________
phoebe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2008, 03:36 PM   #4
Head Chef
 
mcnerd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 1,326
What you did for juice is correct and there is no need to add lemon juice.

For jellies and jams it would be a little different. And, yes, I would check to find out the acidic level of Mulberries if you ever plan to do jellies or jams.

Jellies are what you can do with the liquid, but add lots more sugar and pectin for jelling. Of course there are pectins to reduce the amount of sugar required.

Jams and Preserves use the fruit itself.

Enjoy your canning experiences and don't forget to share with us as you progress along.
__________________
Support bacteria. It's the only culture some people have.
mcnerd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2008, 03:39 PM   #5
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6
Whew, thanks for the quick response. I'm enjoying canning very much so far. Jelly will be my next venture.
__________________
phoebe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2008, 04:18 PM   #6
Senior Cook
 
mozart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 420
See if you can find out what the PH of Mulberries are. If it is under 4.6, then you would be safe from botulism.

BTW, boiling for 10 minutes will destabilize the botulism toxin, if present, not kill the organism. The canning process is supposed to kill the spores of the organism, and if that fails, then boiling will take care of the toxin, which is a protein metabolized by the the organism which activates in canned foods (if present)

Whether you need to boil it or not depends on how comfortable you are with your canning process.

I think you will find that both the acid and the sugar in the juice should make the risk of botulism very very low.
__________________
mozart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2008, 10:20 PM   #7
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Your canned juice should be just fine, phoebe. Mulberry juice is acidic (in the ph=3 range ... generally somewhere between 3.1 - 3.7). Apple juice, depending on variety of apple, has a pH range of 3.35 - 4.00, Grape juice has a pH in the same range as mulberrys - and the guidelines at the National Center for Home Food Preservation do not call for the addition of lemoin juice for canning either of these juices.

Making jelly is a little different. Depending on the recipe you may have to add additional acid (such as lemon juice) to interact with the pectin in order to get a jell instead of a syrup.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2008, 07:15 AM   #8
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6
O.K. Thanks so much! The jelly recipes, I'm finding do indeed ask for lemon juice. That site is very helpful, thanks for the link.
__________________

__________________
phoebe is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.