"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Farm to Table > Canning and Preserving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-06-2014, 09:39 PM   #1
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,408
Quick & Easy Refrigerator Pickles

My grandma Olson was an avid canner. I remember a heavy wooden shelf in her cellar always being loaded with dozens and dozens of jars of preserved vegetables, pickles, and jams/jellies.

Her pickles were, without a doubt, my favorites.

My grandmother's philosophy on pickles was that you did water bath canning in the fall, and ate those during the winter months. Summer, however, was the time to make refrigerator pickles. Those are the ones I really liked. Unlike the canned pickles, which were essentially cooked in a water bath to preserve them, the summer pickles were raw and had a much fresher taste and crunchier texture.

Refrigerator pickles are ridiculously easy to make, and so tasty that they don't tend to hang around for very long. I make some every couple weeks, usually on Saturday mornings after I get back from the farmer's market. I also like to make them in small batches of a few pints at a time. Remember, they are not built for the long term, although they will certainly last for a while if you need them to. With winter canning, my brine is usually a 1:1 ratio of water to vinegar. For summer pickles, I go a bit lighter on the vinegar. I also use about half the salt. So if you're sodium conscious, this is a pretty good recipe.

Feel free to alter the recipe below as you see fit. You don't have to use cucumbers, but note that some vegetables might require blanching for a few minutes in boiling water to soften them. The rule of thumb I use is that if you normally would eat the vegetable raw, then you can pickle it raw. For example, cukes, carrots, radishes, kohlrabi slices. Vegetables that usually require blanching are pearl onions, asparagus, and green beans.

Quick & Easy Refrigerator Pickles
Makes 3 pints

Basic Brine:
  • 2.5 cups water
  • 1.5 cups of your favorite vinegar (must be at least 5% acidity)
  • 1 tbsp canning salt

Spices, for each pint of pickles use:
  • 1 tsp pickling spice (recommend Penzeys)
  • 2 4-inch fronds of fresh dill
  • 1 large clove garlic, sliced lengthwise
  • 1/4 tsp red pepper flakes, or one small dried red chile, such as a pequin
  • For a stronger dill flavor, I'll also usually add an additional teaspoon of dill seed
  • 10-12 small cucumbers, cleaned well and sliced as desired.
  1. In a large saucepan, combine the brine ingredients and bring to a boil. Turn off heat and prepare your vegetables.
  2. In each [scrupulously clean] pint jar, add the spices/flavorings as indicated. Double for quart jars.
  3. Tightly pack as many veggies as you can into each jar. Pour the hot brine into the jars until it is within a half inch of the top. If you have any veggie "floaters," wedge them between other pieces, so they are fully submerged. Lightly screw on the lids and let the jars sit on the counter top until cool enough to handle.
  4. Put the jars in the fridge and leave to cure for 3-5 days before eating.
  5. Use within six weeks. If you plan to keep pickles longer, use a 1:1 water vinegar ratio and double the salt.


__________________

__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2014, 11:42 PM   #2
Master Chef
 
Cheryl J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: California
Posts: 6,298
Thank you, Steve! Copied and saved. I LOVE pickles and don't do canning, so this is perfect.
__________________

__________________
Grandchildren fill the space in your heart you never knew was empty.
Cheryl J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2014, 09:46 AM   #3
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,362
Over the weekend my daughters were here for a cookout. It was fairly windy during the day and SO's potted tomato plant got blown over and one of the green tomatoes fell off.

My younger daughter jokingly demanded that I pickle that single tiny tomato and have it ready for Thanksgiving Dinner.

Steve, your recipe may just be the push I needed to make some pickles (including some green tomato pickles). Copied and saved. Thanks.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2014, 09:53 AM   #4
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 24,098
Oooh, nice! Thanks, Steve! If my cuke plants produce this year as they have in the past, I anticipate a lot of pickles in my future.


Sent from my iPad using Discuss Cooking
__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2014, 12:43 PM   #5
Head Chef
 
powerplantop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 2,154
I just might have to try these.
__________________
My YouTube cooking channel
powerplantop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2014, 01:32 PM   #6
Sous Chef
 
menumaker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: South West France
Posts: 588
Take a bow Steve, your recipe has been the answer to my prayers. Thank you
__________________
Celtic cook

Life is like good wine.......best taken with friends x
menumaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2014, 02:29 PM   #7
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,362
Steve, have you ever used kosher salt in place of canning salt? If so, what is the conversion? 1.5:1.0? or 2.0:1.0?
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2014, 03:33 PM   #8
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,408
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Steve, have you ever used kosher salt in place of canning salt? If so, what is the conversion? 1.5:1.0? or 2.0:1.0?
Andy, you use a 1:1 substitute of kosher salt. The reason canning & pickling recipes call for canning salt is because it doesn't contain any anti-caking agents or iodine, which can lead to a cloudy product. If I recall correctly, Diamond kosher salt has no added ingredients, while Morton does.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2014, 03:44 PM   #9
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,362
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Andy, you use a 1:1 substitute of kosher salt. The reason canning & pickling recipes call for canning salt is because it doesn't contain any anti-caking agents or iodine, which can lead to a cloudy product. If I recall correctly, Diamond kosher salt has no added ingredients, while Morton does.

Thanks, Steve. I was concerned about the difference in grain size. I assume canning/pickling salt has a small grain to facilitate dissolving. DC salt has a large grain so a tbsp of DC salt is half the amount of a tbsp of table salt by weight.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2014, 04:20 PM   #10
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,408
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Thanks, Steve. I was concerned about the difference in grain size. I assume canning/pickling salt has a small grain to facilitate dissolving. DC salt has a large grain so a tbsp of DC salt is half the amount of a tbsp of table salt by weight.
Hmm. That's a good point. Eyeballing the canning salt I have in the pantry, it appears to be about the same coarseness as kosher salt. But after doing a some research, I found a salt conversion chart (who knew?) on Morton's web site, which indicates it takes a little more kosher salt than other types.

Morton Salt | Salt Conversion Chart
__________________

__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
easy, pickles

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:04 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.