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Old 07-23-2013, 10:49 AM   #21
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Having lived on a farm as a kid, and as CWS will tell you, you have to make sure you don't end up with more than one rooster. Most folks who want to have chickens, usually buy them as chicks and don't know the sex of them until one morning they wake up to crowing. Neighbors aren't to fond of that happening.

If you end up with more than one rooster, one of them has to go into the pot for Sunday dinner. Or you will have mayhem in the coop.

I don't understand how the crowing is not going to be a problem here. I don't think there are a lot of people showing interest in this, and I doubt if any of the people in my immediate neighborhood are going to do it. They are mostly senior citizens.
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Old 07-23-2013, 10:56 AM   #22
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Another vote for the tomato press that C-Dub mentioned--I have that same model from Lee Valley.

Most 'city chicken' regulations ban roosters. When you buy chicks, you can get straight run--which means about half and half boys and girls--or you can buy pullets, which are all girls.

Apparently, city humane societies are beginning to see people turning over chickens--either the people are tired of the chickens, or they are old and not laying any more, or they are roosters. If you get chickens, you need to either be ready to make chicken and dumplings, or you need to keep them til they die of old age.
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Old 07-23-2013, 11:30 AM   #23
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Ok, here comes a stupid question from a city girl. Don't you have to have a rooster to get the hens to lay eggs?
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Old 07-23-2013, 12:09 PM   #24
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Ok, here comes a stupid question from a city girl. Don't you have to have a rooster to get the hens to lay eggs?
You only need a rooster if you want to raise chickens.
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Old 07-23-2013, 12:19 PM   #25
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You only need a rooster if you want to raise chickens.
Ok, so you can buy hens and they will grow up to lay eggs, but you only need a rooster if you want the eggs to become baby chicks. Do I have that right? I guess the people here could not do that because they are only allowed to have 7 chickens. They would have to start eating a lot of chicken otherwise.
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Old 07-23-2013, 12:23 PM   #26
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Ok, here comes a stupid question from a city girl. Don't you have to have a rooster to get the hens to lay eggs?
Chickens lay eggs very well without a rooster. The rooster is only needed if you want a clutch of eggs to hatch into baby chicks. And there are no stupid questions. Chickens lay eggs year round, but lay less in the winter. Their cycle is regulated by the amount of daylight. But you can keep a light burning around the clock in the coop and they will continue to lay. The average chicken lays an egg every 26 to 36 hours. CWS is our chicken expert.
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Old 07-23-2013, 12:28 PM   #27
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Ok, so you can buy hens and they will grow up to lay eggs, but you only need a rooster if you want the eggs to become baby chicks. Do I have that right? I guess the people here could not do that because they are only allowed to have 7 chickens. They would have to start eating a lot of chicken otherwise.
You have it right. And with only seven chickens, they will be lucky to have a full dozen by the end of the week once they start laying.
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Old 07-23-2013, 12:31 PM   #28
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You have it right. And with only seven chickens, they will be lucky to have a full dozen by the end of the week once they start laying.

Hardly seems worth it, especially if you plan on eating the chickens, too.
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Old 07-23-2013, 01:03 PM   #29
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Hardly seems worth it, especially if you plan on eating the chickens, too.
I think that's the problem right there with some people in residential areas who want chickens for eggs. They don't want to slaughter the chickens - too messy - so they look for other ways to get rid of them. Like taking them to animal shelters when they can't lay eggs anymore, or it's more work than they realized: Backyard chickens dumped at shelters when hipsters can't cope, critics say

CW, I know this isn't your experience, but you have a farm; raising chickens in residential areas is different. btw, there was an ordinance passed in my town recently allowing chickens, but you have to have a 6,000-square foot lot (ours in an old neighborhood is 4,800 sq. ft.), a certain number of square feet per chicken, a limit on the total number of chickens, and some other restrictions.

There's a group of chicken boosters who have a Facebook page (the leader is the daughter of the president of the master gardener association, so I know them both). She posted that article on Fb and said they have to be careful not to let that happen. So while it's the trendy thing to do, I think a lot of people are going to tire of it quickly.

re: the topic, I don't remove the seeds from tomatoes I can or freeze. I just don't see any benefit.
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Old 07-23-2013, 09:31 PM   #30
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A lot of places that allow chickens do not allow roosters. Cocky Rocky was the most obnoxious rooster--he crowed non-stop. Red hardly crows at all. By-law complaints are driven by neighbors. Hens make a ruckus when they are laying an egg, but otherwise, they are very quiet (unless they are like Gimpy, who talks all the time--it is such a sweet sound).
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