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Old 11-23-2011, 02:05 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
I do the same as you, though I've never had garlic dry up. I find sprouting to be more of a problem.
I don't really mind when it sprouts. I just use the green part too. When I have grown garlic, the greens used to go in salads. I never did get any actual garlic bulbs
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Old 11-23-2011, 02:09 PM   #12
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New refrigerators are so awesome. They keep food as fresh as the comercial type refrigerators do. They will keep vegy/fruits twice as long compare to old ones.
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Old 09-03-2012, 09:05 AM   #13
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Keeping your produce in your crisper is a great start - food packaging solutions for later can be tricky though. Be sure to use flexible packages to keep the air out but allowing room for other things in your fridge. Another tip for fresh baked cookies is to put them in an air tight plastic bag with a piece of bread to keep them moist!
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Old 09-03-2012, 09:23 AM   #14
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I keep garlic in a garlic crock (on the counter at the farm) or in a hanging basket. The quality of garlic one buys makes a difference. Garlic that has a "purplish" color on the skin is fresh garlic (garlic is usually cured for 2 weeks). The variety of garlic also makes a difference. There are varieties that are "keepers" (when the stem dries, it is a hard stem--Georgie Boy is one such variety, as is Russian Red) and those varieties that don't have the hard stem when dried--these varieties do not keep as long. Properly dried, garlic can last up to a year without drying up. Not that it would ever last that long in my house--I use a lot of garlic--probably 3-4 heads / week.

IME, garlic from California, local (+1), and Argentina lasts a lot longer than garlic from China. I have grown garlic, but didn't know when to cut the greens back, so did not get my garlic to bulb. Hopefully, the garlic we plant in October will produce nice bulbs next summer.

Never store onions with potatoes. Keep potatoes in a cool, dark spot in a burlap bag or paper bag. We cure the potatoes we dig in the fall in the sun for at least a day, then we let the potatoes sit on screens for another week, put in burlap sacks and store in a cool, dry place. They start to sprout about February.

We also store carrots and beets in sawdust (since we have a saw mill) and store those in the cold room in the basement. We have beets and carrots until the spring. The worst thing that happens is the carrots start sprouting tops towards spring. But, carrots do last a long time in the crisper.

If you keep zucchini in a cool, dry, dark place, they can keep for 3 weeks or longer. A friend begs me for a "baseball" bat zucchini in September and uses it when she makes her mince pie mix after Canadian Thanksgiving. I try to process the zucchini and freeze it, so I can't swear to it keeping that long, but that is what she does.

I wash romaine lettuce, spin it dry, and wrap in a clean dish towel. This seems to keep it fresh longer than other methods.

I never put tomatoes in the fridge--doing so, causes the tomatoes to lose flavor. Tomatoes are delicate--when refrigerated, the membrane breaks down and the tomatoes develop a mealy texture. If you do store them in the fridge, don't store for more than 1-3 days. Take them out 24 hours before eating and let sit on the counter at room temperature. Some of the enzymes will re-activate. (Here's an interesting article on how to select retail tomatoes, etc.).
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Old 09-03-2012, 10:25 AM   #15
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I put lettuce and other leafy greens, like parsley, in a plastic bag and clip it shut, but I make sure the sides of the top are open to let in air. It really helps keep them fresh and "perky" instead of limp or slimy.
Same here, but I also line the inside of the plastic bag with a paper towel. It's impressive how long herbs and greens will last in the fridge if moisture is kept at bay.
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Old 09-03-2012, 11:31 AM   #16
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I have the same problem Stever Krull, it sprouts but doesn't dry up.

I buy these green bags (from a supplier in the U.K.) they are marvellous.
Evert Fresh Green Bags shipped the next day. Green Bags extend produce freshness. Green Bags Work! says Valerie Rogers Bright Star Promotions
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Old 09-03-2012, 11:35 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Same here, but I also line the inside of the plastic bag with a paper towel. It's impressive how long herbs and greens will last in the fridge if moisture is kept at bay.
Sounds like a good idea. I don't use paper towels, so I will try the generic equivalent of a Handy Wipe.
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Old 09-03-2012, 11:38 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by acerbicacid View Post
I have the same problem Stever Krull, it sprouts but doesn't dry up.

I buy these green bags (from a supplier in the U.K.) they are marvellous.
Evert Fresh Green Bags shipped the next day. Green Bags extend produce freshness. Green Bags Work! says Valerie Rogers Bright Star Promotions
Sounds like an expensive version of what Steve and I do. They even recommend the paper towel. I'm cheap. I get produce and bread in plastic bags and use those. If I hadn't figured out the trick with leaving air to get into the bag, I might use those specialty bags. My sister gets something like that in California and swears by them.
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Old 09-03-2012, 11:52 AM   #19
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Sounds like an expensive version of what Steve and I do. They even recommend the paper towel. I'm cheap. I get produce and bread in plastic bags and use those. If I hadn't figured out the trick with leaving air to get into the bag, I might use those specialty bags. My sister gets something like that in California and swears by them.
A friend of mine swore by them--I tried them, wasn't impressed. I also wasn't impressed by the "green" containers that are supposed to keep things fresher longer. longer. My fridge is about 7 years old now, I tried these about 3 years ago.
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