"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Farm to Table > Canning and Preserving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-07-2007, 08:16 PM   #11
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,357
Quote:
Originally Posted by obiwan9962
understood my friend
i was responding to a previous post
Ok then. I think I'm up to speed now.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2007, 08:25 PM   #12
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: ottawa canada
Posts: 455
Send a message via MSN to obiwan9962 Send a message via Yahoo to obiwan9962
no matter what
we want no one to die or get ill
the suggestion is to get ahold of a local professional to see what he/she does
all else fails find a local food scientist

i am a chef
i know what i've learned over the last 30 years but def not infalliable
__________________

__________________
obiwan9962 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2007, 10:42 PM   #13
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Mounds, Oklahoma USA
Posts: 134
I do a lot of jerky, but mostly with beef. For the "Slim Jim" type jerky, I use American Harvester spices which come in a package of seasoning and a package of "cure". You use one pack of each for a pound of meat.
I personally do not like the texture of ground turkey.
With turkey, I buy a turkey breast, freeze it partly and use my meat slicer, cutting the pieces ACROSS the grain, about 1/4 inch thick. Then I marinate the meat overnight in a ziplock type bag with soy sauce, worchestshire (?) sauce and teriyaki. I use the same procedure for beef roasts.
I dry all of them on my American Harvester dehydrator for about 6 hours at the maximum heat. I turn both types at least once during the drying process and blot the grease with paper towels.
On the turkey, I was worried about samonella, so I take the dried slices and put them on a cookie sheet and put them in the oven at 500 F for about 10 minutes. This also tends to give the turkey a bit of a smoke flavor which I really like.
You can get the American Harvester at the big box superstore or order from on line.
I make about 8 lbs of jerky every weekend.
Old Camp Cook
__________________
oldcampcook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2007, 10:56 PM   #14
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,357
oldcampcook:

How many people are you feeding with that much jerky?
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2007, 11:31 PM   #15
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: ottawa canada
Posts: 455
Send a message via MSN to obiwan9962 Send a message via Yahoo to obiwan9962
OCC thanx for the input
did not think of the blast of 500 then again i never do turkey
__________________
obiwan9962 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2007, 08:54 AM   #16
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Mounds, Oklahoma USA
Posts: 134
AndyM,
I have 3 grandson who would rather eat jerky than candy. I also take jerky and fresh homemade sourdough bread to work every Monday. It resembles feeding time at the zoo about 30 mins after I arrive.

Bob
__________________
oldcampcook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2007, 08:55 AM   #17
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Mounds, Oklahoma USA
Posts: 134
Obiwan9962,
You might want to try the turkey breast. Done that way it is a little crisp and the flavor is awesome.

Bob
__________________

__________________
oldcampcook is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.