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-   -   Tastes Like KFC (http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f15/tastes-like-kfc-100815.html)

Chief Longwind Of The North 09-29-2018 10:58 PM

Tastes Like KFC
 
This tastes like KFC but doesn't require a pressure fryer. Ingredients:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 tsp. kosher salt
1 tsp. granulated garlic powder
1/8 tsp. powdered ginger
1/4 tsp. rubbed sage
1/4 tsp. ground thyme
1 tbs. ground black pepper
1/8 tsp. red pepper
1/2 tsp. Summer Savory
1/4 tsp. dried oregano
1/4 tsp. dried basil
1/4 tso. mustard powder
1/8 tsp. celery seed
1/4 tsp. granulated onion powder
1 tbs. paprika

Combine the flour, herbs, spices and salt in a gallon freezer bag. Add the chicken pieces. Shake to coat all chicken. Put in the refrigerator for three to four hours. The flour will partially hydrate and become a thick past that coats the chicken.

Preheat 2 inches of oil in a frying pan until fragrant. Turn heat to medium-high flame. Place chicken pieces in hot oil and fry each for five minutes. Continue turning and frying until golden brown. Do not crown the chicken so that the hot oil can get all around each piece. Drain on paper towels and serve with your favorite sides.

I have tried bunches of copycat recipes for KFC chicken, some using tomato soup in them, some using tomato powder, some that had just plain strange things in them. None of them tasted anything like KFC chicken. If you bite into KFC chicken, the most pronounce flavors are salt and pepper. The other herbs and spices enhance those flavors, especially the garlic, sage and savory.

Give this recipe a try the next time you want that KFC flavor. Our local KFC went out of business where I live. If I want it, I have to make it. Oh, a and mine isn't as greasy as the stuff from the restaurant.

I like to add to add a little extreme pepper powder to mine, to keep me warm on our cold autumn nights. This is a great meal with waffles, or steamed green beans, or steamed cauliflower. Wish I could make my baked beans, but not allowed on a CKD diet.

Oh, and KFC style slaw is easy tome make as well. Here's how.

Ingredients:
1/2 head of green cabbage
1/2 medium onion
2 carrots, peeled
3 tbs. granulated sugar
1/4 cup Miracle Whip salad dressing
1/4 cup ice water
Grate the cabbage with a box grater and place into a large bowl. Do the same with the carrot and add it too to the bowl. Finely mince the onion and put in the bowl. Add the sugar, salad dressing, and water. Stir until well mixed. This slaw should be very juicy. Cover and place in the fridge until cold.

Home-made Biscuits

1/ cup AP flour
2 tsp double-acting baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tbs. sugar
4 tbs. softened butter.
1/4 cup water

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar. cut in the butter as if making a pie crust. Add the water and stir until a dough is formed. The dough should be a little sticky, but able to be formed into a ball by hand. The less you stir it, the more tender the biscuits will be.

Preheat oven to 350' F. Form dough balls about the size of a golf ball and place on a foil lined cookie sheet. Flatten to about a quarter inch thick. Place in the oven and bake for 12 to 17 minutes, or until golden brown. Serve hot with your chicken dinner, butter, and honey.

With the biscuits, if you make the dough a little dryer, and roll it out, you can spread it with butter, chill it, then fold and roll it again. Do this three or four times to make flaky biscuits, kind of like making puff pastry, but with a leavening agent in it. Use a biscuit cutter, or clean, empty soup can to cut out the biscuits. The biscuits are very good either way. The latter is just more impressive. Use the dough left over from cutting to make fritters. Just work in tome fruit and sugar, and make into doughnut sized pastries.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

Caslon 09-29-2018 11:24 PM

I tried a couple of copy cat KFC chicken recipes. I wasn't that impressed. White pepper was supposed to be the secret ingredient not listed before. What makes KFC chicken taste like KFC chicken is that it's fried in oil under pressure. That makes a huge difference, no matter the copy cat recipe.

Chief Longwind Of The North 09-29-2018 11:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Caslon (Post 1565628)
I tried a couple of copy cat KFC chicken recipes. I wasn't that impressed. White pepper was supposed to be the secret ingredient not listed before. What makes KFC chicken taste like KFC chicken is that it's fried in oil under pressure. That makes a huge difference, no matter the copy cat recipe.

Actually, pressure frying simply makes it cook faster. Heat is the cooking tool. Done properly, I can get chicken as juicy and tender as any I've had at KFC. The flavors come from the seasonings, and the quality of the chicken meat.

If you have any friends that butcher their own chickens, here's a tip. Ask if they will butcher one for you, but in a particular way. The chicken must be turned on its back and an awl, or sharp knife shoved through the brain. This is the most humane method, and like a shark, when the bird is placed on its back, it becomes dormant. It undergoes no stress during the butchering process, and therefore releases no adrenaline into its muscles. This makes for more tender, and better tasting meat. I learned this tip while listening to an NPR radio program from a person who studied butchering techniques in France, and shared what she had found out. It makes sense to me. I'm sure you could find something online to corroborate this technique.

The meat can also be made more tender and flavorful by soaking in milk, buttermilk, or a brine for a few hours. Milk contains enzymes that help tenderize the meat, as does buttermilk. But remember, buttermilk is acidic, and acids tighten up proteins, making the meat tougher. Also, the milk sugar is absorbed by the chicken flesh, making it a little more flavorful as well.

Seeeeeya;Chief Longwind of the North

Caslon 09-29-2018 11:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North (Post 1565632)
Actually, pressure frying simply makes it cook faster. Heat is the cooking tool. Done properly, I can get chicken as juicy and tender as any I've had at KFC. The flavors come from the seasonings, and the quality of the chicken meat.

I'm not that great at frying chicken in oil. Maybe you're right. I cop out and use the "fry quickly in oil, then bake" method. If I don't use that method, my fried chicken in oil comes out terrible. The skin comes out burnt and the chicken undercooked. :sad:

About actually butchering live poultry, here's a funny. Former Alaskan governor Sarah Palin was giving a pardon speech at a turkey farm during Thanksgiving. What she didn't realize was, that, while she was giving that pardon speech to that turkey, the backround video unintentionally showed turkeys with their heads being cut off. :rofl:

Chief Longwind Of The North 09-30-2018 12:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Caslon (Post 1565633)
I'm not that great at frying chicken in oil. Maybe you're right. I cop out and use the "fry quickly in oil, then bake" method. If I don't use that method, my fried chicken in oil comes out terrible. The skin comes out burnt and the chicken undercooked. :sad:

About actually butchering live poultry, here's a funny. Former Alaskan governor Sarah Palin was giving a pardon speech at a turkey farm during Thanksgiving. What she didn't realize was, that, while she was giving that pardon speech to that turkey, the backround video unintentionally showed turkeys with their heads being cut off. :rofl:

Plus one on your method. That's how i learned how to make chicken from my DW, and it comes out so juicy it will squirt you when you bite it. I simply dip the chicken, white or dark meat, into egg wash and dust with flour. Fry in oil intil lightly browned on both sides, then onto a foil lined pan, salt and pepper, and bake at 375 F. for 20 minutes. It come out very light and juicy. I only pan fry when I want that thicker coating. I use 360 F oil so and for about 5 minutes per side. Then it's done through, without scorching the coating. Also, the chicken must be allowed to rest for about ten minutes after coating with seasoned flour to allow it to glue to the chicken. That way it doesn't slide off while cooking or handling after it's cooked.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

Caslon 09-30-2018 12:41 AM

White pepper, don't forget that spice. Supposedly that was the one secret KFC recipe spice not disclosed until a year ago.

Mad Cook 09-30-2018 09:31 PM

I don't know what the franchisees do to things like KFC and McDs over here. I think The Colonel and Ronald Macdonald have special taste-removing, indigestion-causing additions to the stuff they "send" to GB. (I know the raw materials are produced over here but whenever I hear people on your side of the ocean raving about their products I think "Send some over here").

Chief Longwind Of The North 10-01-2018 09:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mad Cook (Post 1565768)
I don't know what the franchisees do to things like KFC and McDs over here. I think The Colonel and Ronald Macdonald have special taste-removing, indigestion-causing additions to the stuff they "send" to GB. (I know the raw materials are produced over here but whenever I hear people on your side of the ocean raving about their products I think "Send some over here").

I have the perfect solution to McD's bland food. I don't eat there.:lol: There operation model is to make barely edible, but not disgusting food that is inexpensive to make, and use production methods that can crank out a whole lot of food in a hurry. They became so big by originally selling there burgers for 20 Cents per burger, compared with the other restaurants usually selling for 45 cents per burger (back in the early 1970's). They made less money per burger, but sold so many more than anyone else that it was profitable. The first time I went to a McDonalds, was with a good friend. He purchased 5 burgers and threw away all of the buns but one. He stacked the five burger patties between the one bun and had a good sized burger for 1 dollar. Of course, there was a local restaurant that made a 3/4 lb. burger with a thick slice of American cheese melted on top, all on a large, soft but, with all the good stuff for 99 cents. And there fries were better too.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

GotGarlic 10-01-2018 10:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North (Post 1565819)
I have the perfect solution to McD's bland food. I don't eat there.[emoji38] There operation model is to make barely edible, but not disgusting food that is inexpensive to make, and use production methods that can crank out a whole lot of food in a hurry. They became so big by originally selling there burgers for 20 Cents per burger, compared with the other restaurants usually selling for 45 cents per burger (back in the early 1970's). They made less money per burger, but sold so many more than anyone else that it was profitable. The first time I went to a McDonalds, was with a good friend. He purchased 5 burgers and threw away all of the buns but one. He stacked the five burger patties between the one bun and had a good sized burger for 1 dollar. Of course, there was a local restaurant that made a 3/4 lb. burger with a thick slice of American cheese melted on top, all on a large, soft but, with all the good stuff for 99 cents. And there fries were better too.

Like other companies that want to stay in business, McDonald's has upped their game recently in response to higher expectations from younger customers. Last spring they rolled out the new Quarter Pounder, which is cooked fresh to order from meat that has never been frozen. It's good - more juicy and flavorful than before.

They have also updated the interiors of most of the stores. They have very good coffee and have added seating areas that are more like a traditional coffee shop. I've seen some when traveling that have beautiful wood and stone wall surfaces. And of course, they have charging outlets for devices.

Chief, time to some more research. They've changed since the '70s :wink:

Traveler 10-01-2018 10:52 AM

CHIEF LONGWIND, My "KFC" cole slaw recipe is quite similar to yours except I add 1 tsp dried tarragon and I use much, much less onion. I use 1 tsp minced fresh onion.


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