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texasgirl 04-19-2005 10:02 AM

Recipe for filet mignon
 
What type of beef is best to use, and what kind of spices taste best.

Raine 04-19-2005 10:20 AM

The term "filet mignon" is a French derivative, the literal meaning is small (mignon) bone-less meat (filet). Cut from the small end of the beef tenderloin.

Depending upon what part of the United States you're in, the tenderloin muscle of the cow or short loin, becomes Filet Mignon, Chateaubriand, Tournedos, Medallions, or Filet de Boeuf. Filet Mignon is also know as Tenderloin Steak (in fact most often I see it as Tenderloin Steak).

Filet Mignon or Tenderloin Steak is a cut of meat that is considered the king of steaks because of its tender, melt in the mouth texture. It comes from the small end of the tenderloin (called the short loin) which is found on the back rib cage of the animal. Because this area of the animal is not weight-bearing, the connective tissue is not toughened by exercise resulting in extremely tender meat. Filet mignon slices found in the market are generally one to two inches thick and two to three inches in diameter, but true mignons are no more than one inch in diameter and are taken from the tail end.



As far as spices, anything that you like with beef. Check the recipes here in the beef section, I'm sure there are some good recipes for it. If you don't see anything you like holler. I'm sure someone will have another one.

jennyema 04-19-2005 11:14 AM

Filet mignon, as Rainee explains, is a type (cut) of steak.

It is quite pricey and, IMO, should not be overly seasoned. Salt is a must and some pepper. That's enough for me, since the whole point of spending big bucks on filet is to taste the meat, not seasoning.

I save seasoning (eg, teriyaki, etc.) for lesser cuts that need more "dressing up."

Chief Longwind Of The North 04-19-2005 11:23 AM

Just a bit of info to add to Reinee's excellent post. I personally find the tenderloin to have less flavor than a good rib-steak, especially those cut closer to the shoulder, or chuck as it's normally called. As the chuck is weight bearing, it gets more blood, which in turn feeds the muscle tissue with more nutrients and added flavor. The rib-steak is still tender, and if from a gery good cow (USDA Prime), is very tender. Give me a Delmonico anytime over a Fillet Mingon.

The fillet, of course is a great cut for dressing up a meal. Wrap teh outside in bacon, Grill it over fire, set it on top of an artichoke heart, and maybe top with a portabella cap of about the same diameter (not in the original French recipe, but very tasty) and you have the classic tournedo.

In any case, you can't go wrong with what Rainee tells you. When it comes to beef and pork, she knows her stuff.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

texasgirl 04-19-2005 11:44 AM

ok
 
So, basically, beef tenderloin is best. Thank you so much.
You all are walking cooking enyclopedias:smile: . You all are great!

kitchenelf 04-19-2005 12:45 PM

Beef tenderloin is considered the best texasgirl - but I'm with Goodweed on this one - give me a ribeye/Delmonico steak anytime.

Now that's not saying I haven't bought a few tenderloins in my time - cut into nice thick steaks. I like olive oil, salt, pepper, and I make a horseradish crust similar to the Wildfire Horseradish Porkchops recipe posted here. That's pretty tasty on the outside edge.

mugsy27 04-19-2005 02:03 PM

just a suggestion..try a dry rub of salt, pepper, and CARDAMOM! throw that bad boy (or girl) on the grill for about 3-4 per side...YUMMY!!!!

jennyema 04-19-2005 03:10 PM

You might consider a T-bone steak or a Porterhouse steak.

Both of these steaks have a bone running through it. On one side of the bone, there is a small tenderloin steak and on the other side of the bone there is a top loin steak, which they call a "New York Strip steak" here.

http://animalscience.unl.edu/meats/id/Beef7-1.htm

velochic 05-06-2005 04:14 PM

Just to clarify, mignon actually means "delicate" in french. So the steak filet is tender, not small (which is "petit" in french). And so far, I haven't found filet mignon at restaurants in France. :rolleyes: Of course, with all of the other great food, why look? :tongue:

ironchef 05-06-2005 05:45 PM

Try this with your steak.

Rosemary and Port Wine Demi-Glace

Yield: 1/2 – 2/3 cups

Ingredients:

2 c. Veal or Beef Stock
1 c. Ruby Port Wine
2 Sprigs of Fresh Rosemary
3 Shallots, finely minced
½ c. Leeks (white part only), thinly sliced
2 Bay Leaves
2 tsp. Canola Oil
3 Tbsp. Unsalted Butter
Kosher salt to taste

Method:

Sauté the shallots and leeks in oil until translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Add the port, and reduce until the liquid becomes thick and syrupy (it should be able to lightly coat the back of a spoon). Add the stock and bay leaves, bring to a boil, and then simmer until reduced by half. Lightly bruise the rosemary, add it to the sauce. Continue to reduce the sauce until approx 1/2 to 2/3 cups remain. Strain into a separate pan, then off the heat, whisk in the butter until it’s emulsified. Season to taste with the kosher salt.

**Because this sauce is concentrated, it is NOT meant to drench the meat in. 2-3 tablespoons of sauce will suffice because the flavor is so rich. You don’t want to overpower the meat.

lutzzz 05-06-2005 10:09 PM

I don't recommend any "spices" for filet mignon... they have very delicate flavor and can be overpowed easily and I personally find it difficult to cook a 1 3/4" or 2" filet mignon successfully on the stovetop alone, but then cooking is kinda new to me and I'm still learning ... I like my filet medium rare and to get that degree of doneness in a fry pan alone takes too long.. the crust can get too dark, as in "burnt" a bit... I guess I could cook it at a lower heat and longer... but I don't get that same "semi-charred" crust that way.

So, the solution for me is, if cooking indoors (which is rare 'cause I cook 99.44/100th % of my steaks on a Weber kettle using lump charcoal), to preheat my oven to about 425 degrees while I'm heating my heavy fry pan on the stove over medium high heat (5 minutes of so)... (I use a lodge cast iron pan but a good heavy stainless as in All-Clad or equivalent works too).

Then I just salt & pepper my steak, add a splash or two of olive oil in the heated pan and immediately toss the steaks in (I turn on my overhead vent 'cause there will be some smoke)...

I cook them on one side about 5 minutes (don't touch them.. just let them get a good crust), then turn them over and immediately put them in the oven (middle rack) for about 7 minutes.. that comes out medium rare for me... 5 minutes would be rare and 9 minutes would be medium well.. or thereabouts.

Then let them sit for at least 5 minutes before you cut into them.

On the Weber 22" kettle, I do about the same thing... I use lump which burns hotter than briquettes... after it gets going, I stack it heavy on one side and just a few pieces on the other.. then I sear the steaks for 3-4 minutes on the "hot" side (you could cook for 5 minutes if you're using briquettes).. then, with tongs, pick them up and turn them over and place on the "cool" side of the grill.. put the lid on.. finish my Guinness, and about 5-7 minutes later I have a nice medium rare filet mignon...

luvs 05-07-2005 01:07 AM

i like filet, but am another that prefers ribeye/delmonico. it's definately more flavorful and very tender. as for the filet, it requires very little in the way of seasoning. as was mentioned, salt and pepper. and forget about steak sauce. it's just not necessary. Ruth'sChris serves thier steaks in butter. so does my Grandpa. it's delicious.

marmalady 05-07-2005 05:40 AM

We used to do 'everything' filet for catering gigs - you know, like 'everything' bagels; make a mixture of salt, pepper, dried garlic chips, dried onion chips, poppy seed, sesame seed. Oil the filet, then roll it in the mixture, and roast til med-rare.

Served it with a green-peppercorn mayo -

GREEN PEPPERCORN SAUCE


makes 2 ½ cups



2 cups mayo
¼ cup dijon
3T green peppercorns
2 cloves garlic
2T lemon juice



Blend in processor til smooth.

lutzzz 05-07-2005 11:31 AM

Being relatively new to the cooking scene, unlike most of you, I wanted to be sure I was talking about "apples & apples", so to speak. So I did some checking to be sure I was going to be "on topic" in this thread.. I found these definitions (among others) on the net.

1.) "The filet mignon is usually 1 to 2 inches thick and l 1/2 to 3 inches in diameter."
2.) "...fillet, filet — a boneless steak cut from the tenderloin of beef."
3.) "The noun filet mignon has one meaning: small steak cut from the thick end of a beef tenderloin."
4.) "The tenderloin runs along either side of the spine, and is usually harvested as two long snake-like shaped cuts of beef. The tenderloin is sometimes sold whole. If the short end of the tenderloin is cut into portions before cooking, that portion is known as Filet Mignon, or the filet." etc. etc.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ref: Dictionary definition of filet mignon:
The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright © 2004, 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. More from Dictionary
Food Glossary information about filet mignon
© 2002 HungryMonster.com™. All Rights Reserved. More from Food Glossary
WordNet information about filet mignon
WordNet 1.7.1 Copyright © 2001 by Princeton University.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://home.comcast.net/~lutz7/tenderloindiagram.gif

I personally prefer other cuts of beef for my steaks... I'm not sure which I really prefer.. a ribeye, or "new york" strip, or a "t-bone" where I can have the best of both worlds. I have various reasons for preferring each... perhaps coinciding with the phase of the moon or the tides.. have to give it some thought which I'm not up to right now.

It might be interesting for someone to start a thread about tenderloin "roasts" and/or which beef steak is "best" and why... Everyone seems to have their own preference and reasons for it... there's another popular steak around here called a "hangar"? (sp?) .. a tougher cut of beef but supposedly with excellent flavor IF prepared properly...

If someone does, I'll probably kill the thread by posting to it later :smile: I'm going out to poach some more Dungeness Crab before they molt.

ironchef 05-07-2005 03:51 PM

Quote:

It might be interesting for someone to start a thread about tenderloin "roasts" and/or which beef steak is "best" and why... Everyone seems to have their own preference and reasons for it... there's another popular steak around here called a "hangar"? (sp?) .. a tougher cut of beef but supposedly with excellent flavor IF prepared properly...
There was a post already like this that someone started awhile back. You can search for that thread if you want.

A hanger steak is similar to flank or skirt steak in texture and flavor. You can interchange the three steaks in any recipe.

And send some of that crab down to LA will ya?

Rob Babcock 05-08-2005 02:08 AM

One nice addition to tenderloin, be it steaks or chateuabriand (sp?) is a nice crust of bleu or gorganzola cheese. If you combine that with a tad of horseradish & a bit of parmesan cheese, add it to the steak when it's almost done and toss it under a top broiler til it crusts. Simply heavenly!:chef:

RPCookin 05-08-2005 09:08 AM

One thing to keep in mind when grilling or broiling a fillet. It is typically not well marbled and thus is easy to dry out and ruin. The reason for the traditional wrap of bacon around the edge is to help maintain the moisture content of the the meat, not really for flavoring. I never cook a fillet more than medium rare. :chef:

Like others have said, I too prefer a rib-eye, either with or without bone, over a fillet.

lutzzz 05-08-2005 10:13 AM

Ironchef... you mean these things?
http://home.comcast.net/~lutz7/crabpot7.jpg
Sorry.. ya know Dungeness Crab is like s e x.. it's almost impossible to get too much :smile:

We cheated and bought some shrimp and frozen corn.. and I had to buy the mussels too although I can usually find some nice Penn Cove mussels.. not enough time... and cooked everything up like this...
http://home.comcast.net/~lutz7/crabpot10.jpg
Now that I've gone TOTALLY off-topic.. back to the topic...

Rob.. I'll drink to that... bleu cheese is GREAT (IMHO) on any steak... and I love fresh horseradish... if/when I can find it in the stores... `most people here look a fresh horseradish and ask the produce guys.. "what's THIS stuff?"

I remember the first time I did fresh horseradish.. I peeled it (not easy) and wanted to shred it but didn't have the right grater or something.. wasn't working.. so I cut it in chunks and tossed it in my food processor.. ran it for awhile until it was in very small "grains".. then I leaned over, opened the lid, and the fumes about flat knocked me on my back... AMAZING :rolleyes:

man.. there ain't NOTHING more potent that fresh horseradish I know off anyway,, but it's just so much better than the jar stuff... much better "personality"...

Now you all have me fired up to buy a whole tenderloin... cut my own steaks (much cheaper here).

RP...I've never wrapped them in bacon... great idea.. gonna try that... time for second cup of coffee.. back later.

kleenex 05-08-2005 10:34 AM

Sure filet mignon is cheap. If you think four 16 ounce 2" thick bone in ones for $219.95 is cheap.

http://www.allenbrothers.com/findPro...categoryId=100

lutzzz 05-08-2005 10:54 AM

Quote:

Sure filet mignon is cheap. If you think four 16 ounce 2" thick bone in ones for $219.95 is cheap
Well, kleenex.. IF ya wanna shop on the Internet & buy PRIME grade tenderloin... you're obviously right... but I'm not sure Prime is THAT much better than Choice in a tenderloin.. by nature, a tenderloin really doesn't have much "marbling" anyway... so I'm kinda at a loss as to what makes it Prime.... or the difference.

Anyway, here (Seattle area) I can buy Choice tenderloin.. to be fashionable I can even get the "Black Angus" stuff (not sure it's any better though) at about $15.95-$18.95 per lb (less on sale).. and I can cut THREE steaks from one pound... about the right size, IMHO, for a "filet mignon"...

If I can get pretty good tenderloin here in Seattle (not known for good beef.. not too many cows swimming around in the Puget Sound lately), you can probably find some where you live at a "sane" price and not have to buy off the Internet..???

Be interested if anyone believes/finds Prime grade tenderloin to be worth the extra $10.00? per lb over Choice? However, I don't recall ever buying/having Prime grade in tenderloin either, except perhaps at a restaurant... so I'm not sure...

lutzzz 05-08-2005 11:17 AM

BTW kleenex.. when I said "cheaper that way" i.e. buy the WHOLE tenderloin and cut your own steaks... the statement I made was obviously relative and begs the question... "cheaper than WHAT?"...

So, to clarify.. ."cheaper" than buying the individual cut steaks wrapped up fancy in that plastic wrap in the store's meat case...

And I should have added to the last post.. you might try shopping at Costco if you have one around.. of Cash & Carry (a smaller version of a restaurant supply place in a few Western states) http://www.smartandfinal.com/store_locations.asp

And I'm told, but never tried, the Walmart (Sam's? warehouse equivalent) have decent meat too, not sure... but I think they all sell good "Choice" grade meat but I've never seen "Prime"... I'll ask next time I go meat shopping.. been too busy eating crab lately to shop for beef http://home.comcast.net/~lutz7/chesscat.gif

HanArt 05-08-2005 12:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lutzzz

Be interested if anyone believes/finds Prime grade tenderloin to be worth the extra $10.00? per lb over Choice? However, I don't recall ever buying/having Prime grade in tenderloin either, except perhaps at a restaurant... so I'm not sure...

Around here it averages about $5 more for Prime. Not really worth it in my opinion.

We tried Sam's beef once. The filets are cheaper than other markets, but not as tasty. Can't remember if they were Choice or not.

BTW, beautiful seafoodl!

Andy M. 05-08-2005 12:16 PM

Costco's whole tenderloins are choice grade and under $10.00 a pound. I've had good luck with them, making steaks, roasts and using the scraps and tips for misc. other goodies.

I believe Sam's Club and BJ's also sell choice grade meats.

kleenex 05-08-2005 02:03 PM

If you want a full tenderloin to cut up anyway you want Lobels.com sells approximately 3.5 pounds of American Wagyu whole tenderloin for the small price of $278.98 or close to 80 bucks per pound.

http://www.lobels.com/store/main/item.asp?item=126

ironchef 05-08-2005 03:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lutzzz
Ironchef... you mean these things?
http://home.comcast.net/~lutz7/crabpot7.jpg
Sorry.. ya know Dungeness Crab is like s e x.. it's almost impossible to get too much :smile:

We cheated and bought some shrimp and frozen corn.. and I had to buy the mussels too although I can usually find some nice Penn Cove mussels.. not enough time... and cooked everything up like this...
http://home.comcast.net/~lutz7/crabpot10.jpg


Dude....that was not cool posting those pics!!!! :lol:

I ate something similar to that at this place in Seattle right on the waterfront near the Marriot I think. You could choose from I think 5 different mixed seafood boils (they got progressively higher as the amount/variety of seafood increased) and they put it on newspaper and gave you mallets to break the crab shells. I forget the name, but it was in a little shopping area on a pier that had an arcade in there. It was pretty close to the aquarium.

You know where they had really good food? At the Seattle Art Museum. That little cafe in there was really good.

jennyema 05-09-2005 11:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy M.
Costco's whole tenderloins are choice grade and under $10.00 a pound. I've had good luck with them, making steaks, roasts and using the scraps and tips for misc. other goodies.

I believe Sam's Club and BJ's also sell choice grade meats.


Julia Child bought her meat at either Costco or BJ's ... I think the former.

Raine 05-09-2005 12:35 PM

SAM's meat is all choice, and you usually can't beat their price.


Walmart sells select (choice on occasion) and most if not all their meat is injected.

kleenex 05-10-2005 04:53 PM

It is almost impossible to find Prime meat at a grocery store.

HanArt 05-10-2005 05:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rainee
Walmart sells select (choice on occasion) and most if not all their meat is injected.

And that stuff is plain nasty! The only meat I'll buy at Walmart is Louisiana sausage.

jennyema 05-11-2005 10:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rainee
SAM's meat is all choice, and you usually can't beat their price.


Walmart sells select (choice on occasion) and most if not all their meat is injected.


Injected beef? Yuck. I hadn't heard of that.

buckytom 05-11-2005 10:55 AM

whole beef tenderloins from costco get my vote. i trim them and freeze them in thick portions, roughly 2 to 3 inches.
i also agree with using only a little salt and pepper, then cooking on a charcoal grill. they are sometimes served with buttered mushrooms and a thyme/red wine/shallot reduction.
the trimmings from the whole tenderloin get chopped tossed into some butter in a skillet or onto the goerge foreman, then are served to our cats as a treat, or to the stray cats in the neighborhood. haven't seen a mouse in years...:chef:

Andy M. 05-11-2005 11:36 AM

Bucky:

You're a generous guy. I use the tenderloin trimmings for myself!

On another note, I may be in the minority. I prefer my filet mignon pan seared and finsihed in the oven. Other steaks, sirloin strip or ribeye go to the grill.

buckytom 05-11-2005 02:27 PM

i hope you don't have to eat them from a bowl on the floor, andy...:smile:

my cats get upset when i stick my head in between them for some.
(i won't even mention what happens with the litterbox!)

Andy M. 05-11-2005 03:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by buckytom
...my cats get upset when i stick my head in between them for some...

We don't have any cats so I have the floor to myself.

kadesma 05-15-2005 05:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ironchef
Try this with your steak.

Rosemary and Port Wine Demi-Glace

Yield: 1/2 – 2/3 cups

Ingredients:

2 c. Veal or Beef Stock
1 c. Ruby Port Wine
2 Sprigs of Fresh Rosemary
3 Shallots, finely minced
½ c. Leeks (white part only), thinly sliced
2 Bay Leaves
2 tsp. Canola Oil
3 Tbsp. Unsalted Butter
Kosher salt to taste

Method:

Sauté the shallots and leeks in oil until translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Add the port, and reduce until the liquid becomes thick and syrupy (it should be able to lightly coat the back of a spoon). Add the stock and bay leaves, bring to a boil, and then simmer until reduced by half. Lightly bruise the rosemary, add it to the sauce. Continue to reduce the sauce until approx 1/2 to 2/3 cups remain. Strain into a separate pan, then off the heat, whisk in the butter until it’s emulsified. Season to taste with the kosher salt.

**Because this sauce is concentrated, it is NOT meant to drench the meat in. 2-3 tablespoons of sauce will suffice because the flavor is so rich. You don’t want to overpower the meat.

Ironchef, just spotted this recipe..'ve been into making my own, chicken , beef and veal stock..And have been wanting a good sauce for some beautiful fillets and ribeyes we've been treated to. This looks just the ticket..Thanks..It looks so good:smile:
kadesma

ironchef 05-16-2005 02:12 PM

Let me know how it turns out. One thing I forgot to add in the recipe is that the port reduction, before you add the stock, should yield about 1/4 cup.

kadesma 05-16-2005 06:28 PM

Thanks Ironchef, I'll make a note on the recipe...

kadesma:smile:


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