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-   -   Dont want to ruin my Filet Mignons... (http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f48/dont-want-to-ruin-my-filet-mignons-12281.html)

Mylegsbig 06-26-2005 04:28 PM

Dont want to ruin my Filet Mignons...
 
Hey guys question - I have followed specific instructions on making steaks before, using prime expensive cuts of meat, and ended up with a burnt inedible crust... im going to get some prime filet mignon and want to cook some steaks for me and my fiance...

i intend on searing the steaks and finishing them in the broiler...

Question - Would they be more likely to burn in a steel skillet or a non-stick pan? How high should i turn up the heat to sear? like 7 or 8? not on HIGH correct?

Also, i want to finish the steaks under the broiler after searing. How long should i sear? Just a few seconds to seal it it? These will be a normal size filet, small in diameter and very thick maybe 2 inch thick? you know, the ones youve seen in the pictures

Also, how many inches from the broiler should i put the filets? How long on each side should i cook them if i want the steaks to be pink all the way through, but not that purple uncooked color? I think like a medium rare - medium is my goal.

Also, would a balsamic vinegar + garlic + fresh ground black pepper make a decent reduction to pour, or do i have to use red wine?

Thanks...

mudbug 06-26-2005 04:40 PM

I think you're gonna kill it if you sear and broil, legs.

I am mos' definitely not an expert on cooking meat, but searing will seal the outer surface, as will broiling. Sear in a steel pan, then put in the middle of the oven to finish cooking (experts chime in here, please).

Not sure on the ingredients for reduction, altho they all sound tasty. I think you probably need some oil or the wine or something else to make it palatable.

amber 06-26-2005 04:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mylegsbig
Hey guys question - I have followed specific instructions on making steaks before, using prime expensive cuts of meat, and ended up with a burnt inedible crust... im going to get some prime filet mignon and want to cook some steaks for me and my fiance...

i intend on searing the steaks and finishing them in the broiler...

Question - Would they be more likely to burn in a steel skillet or a non-stick pan? How high should i turn up the heat to sear? like 7 or 8? not on HIGH correct?

Also, i want to finish the steaks under the broiler after searing. How long should i sear? Just a few seconds to seal it it? These will be a normal size filet, small in diameter and very thick maybe 2 inch thick? you know, the ones youve seen in the pictures

Also, how many inches from the broiler should i put the filets? How long on each side should i cook them if i want the steaks to be pink all the way through, but not that purple uncooked color? I think like a medium rare - medium is my goal.

Also, would a balsamic vinegar + garlic + fresh ground black pepper make a decent reduction to pour, or do i have to use red wine?

Thanks...

I've used a cast iron skillet with great results. To sear I use med high heat, and also add some onions, and worchestire (sp) sauce, then place the pan in the oven, not the broiler, for about 20 minutes for medium rare-medium on the middle rack in the oven. Your reduction sauce sounds good to me, considering that balsamic vinegar is an aged wine I think, but red wine would be just as good.

ironchef 06-26-2005 05:04 PM

You'll want to sear it on high but when you finish cooking it in the oven, it should be on "roast" or "bake" and NOT broil. Set your oven to 450 (make sure the pan you are using can handle that high a temp., if not, then 400 is fine).

Regarding your sauce, the balsamic reduction will be too sweet and will overpower the delicate taste of the filet, unless it's just a side component to compliment another sauce. I've used balsamic reductions with steaks, but not by itself, unless all you want to taste is the sauce. Use this simple reduction instead:

Combine 4 cups Veal or Beef Stock and 2 cups red wine. Reduce until about 2 cups remain. Add 2 sprigs rosemary, 2 cloves of crushed garlic, and continue to reduce until approx. 1 cup is left. Do not drench your steaks in this sauce as it is very concentrated. A little goes a long way. Start this sauce about 1 1/2 hours before you do your steak as the sauce takes a while to reduce, and the steak should only take 8 minutes to cook.

Andy M. 06-26-2005 05:09 PM

Use the steel skillet to sear on high for about 2-2.5 minutes per side. Then put it into a 400F oven for 9 minutes for rare. 10-11 for medium rare to medium. Let teh meat rest, tented with foil for 5-10 minutes before serving.

Mylegsbig 06-26-2005 06:05 PM

thanks for the replies. Hey - I dont want to buy another bottle of Red Wine as im trying not to drink, and if i buy a bottle, we'll end up drinking it.

can i combine those herbs and the beef stock with balsamic vinegar instead of wine?

What are the new proportions? Shoudl i use less balsamic in this mix than if i was using wine?

Also, Hey Andy, i think im going to do it that way you said it sounds the easiest.

I will sear the steaks for 2 minutes on each side, but on Medium High like 7 or 8 instead of HIGH, like i said, ive burnt steaks and ruined them searing on high.

So since im searing on medium high rather than high, how much longer should i stick the filet's in the oven @ 400 degrees? Anyway i can get an adjustment?


Basically if i sear on 7-8 for 2 minutes each side, and finish in oven @ 400 degrees, how many minutes for in between medium rare and medium?

Thanks so much and sorry for the specifics of the questions, but i do not want to ruin 30 dollars in steaks, as i've done in the past.....

thanks for your patience

Respectfully,

bigleg.

ironchef 06-26-2005 06:15 PM

You could "sear" it on medium high, but you may as well finish cooking the steak on the stovetop since it will take a lot longer to get the crust you want. By that time, the steak close to rare.

You can use this recipe if you want. If you don't have the dried cranberries then just omit it.

Cranberry Balsamic Demi-Glace


4 Cups Veal or Beef Stock
1 Cup Balsamic Vinegar
1 Cup Dried Cranberries
2 Shallots, finely minced
2 tsp. Canola Oil
Kosher Salt to taste
2-3 Fresh or Dried Bay Leaves

Sauté shallots in oil until they are translucent, about 3-4 minutes and the add stock, and the bay leaves.. Bring stock to boil, and then simmer until reduced by approx. ½. Soak cranberries in the balsamic vinegar for 15 minutes. Strain vinegar into a saucepan and reduce vinegar until syrupy—keep warm. When the stock is reduced, stir in the balsamic syrup and the cranberries. Reduce remaining liquid by about 1/3. Season to taste with salt.

GB 06-26-2005 06:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mylegsbig

i intend on searing the steaks and finishing them in the broiler...

Question - Would they be more likely to burn in a steel skillet or a non-stick pan?

You may want to check with the maker of your non stick pans before putting them under the broiler. All the ones I know of void the warranty if you do that. It could also damage the non stick coating. Those pans are not designed for that much heat.

Chief Longwind Of The North 06-26-2005 08:58 PM

GB is absolutley correct. Do not put non-stick under the broiler. It begins breaking down around 425 degrees and gives off poisonous gasses at 450. The broiler is hotter than that.

Also, either broil two inches from the heat source for 4 minutes per side, or sear in a heavy metal pan for two minutes per side, then finish in the oven as suggested by the others.
Better yet, fire up the grill and use fire to flavor the meat.

Fillet Mignon is a very delicately flavored meat and is easily overpowered. This is why it is often werved with bacon wrapped around it, to add flavor. It is great when cooked to rare, or medium rare, placed on a steamed artichoke heart, and topped with a grilled portabella mushroom cap. Mushrooms have an componant much like MSG that naturally enhanses the flavor of meats, especially beef.

For my tastes, I will always choose a good rib steak over a fillet any day. It has so much more flavor and can be as tender. Tenderness is the fillet's claim to fame, not its flavor.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

Andy M. 06-26-2005 10:19 PM

MLB:

Tell me about the steel skillet you refer to in your post. Is it stainless tri-ply or does it have a mulit-layer disk on the bottom or is it just a single layer of steel? It makes a difference.


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