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mudbug 09-19-2004 08:53 AM

Cooking on a woodstove
 
When Handy Husband retires, he would love for us to live out in the boonies in a cabin so he could go hunting and we could live like Tarzan and Jane. I'm of a mind to humor himon this because he is such a nice man, but what about cooking on the woodstove? I have zero experience and need some pointers.

Raine 09-19-2004 09:03 AM

Probably be some of the best eating you've ever had.


Biggest thing is learn fire control.

Psiguyy 09-20-2004 01:11 AM

I've cooked on a wood fired stove and it's not as hard as you would think so long as you realize that you control the temperature by moving the pot or pan to another part of the stove where it's either hotter or cooler.

If you want even hotter heat, you remove the cast iron insert and expose the pan to direct fire. If the fire isn't strong enough, you can either feed more wood into the box through the door or directly through the top, if the wood is small enough.

The hardest thing to deal with is trying to decide if you're going to let the fire go out until the next time you want too cook something which means starting the fire and waiting for the stove to come to operating temperature or are you going to keep the fire going all day long?

mudbug 09-20-2004 07:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Psiguyy
I've cooked on a wood fired stove and it's not as hard as you would think so long as you realize that you control the temperature by moving the pot or pan to another part of the stove where it's either hotter or cooler.

If you want even hotter heat, you remove the cast iron insert and expose the pan to direct fire. If the fire isn't strong enough, you can either feed more wood into the box through the door or directly through the top, if the wood is small enough.

The hardest thing to deal with is trying to decide if you're going to let the fire go out until the next time you want too cook something which means starting the fire and waiting for the stove to come to operating temperature or are you going to keep the fire going all day long?

Makes sense to me, psiguyy. Probably the best thing would be to keep some coals banked until mealtime rolls around again. And make sure there's plenty of chopped wood handy at the right moment.

crewsk 09-20-2004 08:40 AM

I grew up with a cast iron wood stove. When it would snow our power always went out. My mom would always cook a big pot of chili or beans on top of it. The smell was awesome! She also made hot chocolate on it!

mudbug 09-20-2004 10:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crewsk
I grew up with a cast iron wood stove. When it would snow our power always went out. My mom would always cook a big pot of chili or beans on top of it. The smell was awesome! She also made hot chocolate on it!

That sounds neat. I've often thought that most of us would be lost if the power went permanently out. We are so dependent on things that plug into the wall...................

crewsk 09-20-2004 10:26 AM

It was great, I used to sit next to the vents & dry my hair during the winter. The only downfall was that I went to school smelling like burnt wood! They got rid of it about 8 yrs. ago & got gas logs. They were afraid one of the grandkids would fall on it & get hurt or burnt.

Psiguyy 09-20-2004 04:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crewsk
I grew up with a cast iron wood stove. When it would snow our power always went out. My mom would always cook a big pot of chili or beans on top of it. The smell was awesome! She also made hot chocolate on it!

The stove I've used was in a cabin where it got COLD at night. The cabin, being a cabin, didn't have any insulation. The only source of heat was the cast iron stove. The big and funny problem was that the stove couldn't make it through the night without adding wood to it. Invariably, around 2 AM, somebody would have to wake up and add wood. The funny part is, we'd all wake up from the cold, but nobody would want to actually get out of the bunk and add wood.

It was always a challenge to stay in bed and shiver and see who would finally give in to the cold and add wood to the fire. The really funny thing is we'd never ever admit to waking up because of the cold.

Lucky thing it was all guys. If my mother was there, she would have been screaming at all us low-lifes for not getting up to stoke the fire.

crewsk 09-20-2004 04:20 PM

Psiguyy, I know what you mean, sort of. We lived in a 2 story house w/ central heat & my room was upstairs. It was the last one to get heat, I know that heat rises, but it was the coldest room in the house. When our power would go out, my brother & I would sleep downstairs in front of the stove & it was our job to keep it burning. Which meant one of us going outside to get the wood(my mom refused to keep the wood in the house because of spiders & wood scoripons), it usually wound up being me which really stunk!

Psiguyy 09-20-2004 09:26 PM

crewsk, I don't know about you, but I look back at those memories with fondness.

Anybody want to exchange outhouse stories? :shock:


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