Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums

Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums (http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/)
-   Cookware (http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f89/)
-   -   Cuisinart Cookware - Copper sandwiched in the base (http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f89/cuisinart-cookware-copper-sandwiched-in-the-base-30635.html)

bluemack 12-30-2006 11:17 PM

Cuisinart Cookware - Copper sandwiched in the base
 
Back in the early 90's I purchased some SS Cuisinart cookware but in this case, instead of aluminum in the disk on the base, there is copper. You can even see the copper line if you look at the base of the pots. Back when I was buying Cuisinart Food Processors, the company was also giving away different pots if you sent in a FP proof of purchase.

Just out of curiousity, how do these pieces compare to the aluminum base models of the present Cuisinart line? Just curious. (I have a 5 qt saute pan, a 1 qt saute pan, 1.5 qt saucepan and another 3 quart casserole piece. Anyone have any cooking experience with these kinds of pots?

thanks.

mack

Andy M. 12-30-2006 11:34 PM

As has been discussed in response to several of your earlier questions, there is no practical difference between copper and aluminum in the disk.

I had several pieces of Cuisinart Everyday which had the disk with copper. They worked well and my daughter is using them now.

Ron W. 12-31-2006 08:07 AM

The Cuisinart Chef's Classic SS has a fully encapsulated aluminum core bottom which covers the full width of the cookware.
The Everyday SS has a copper core bottom that wasn't fully encapsulaed and doesn't cover the entire bottom surface of this line fo cookware. Not being fully encapsulated is the reason you can see the copper circle around the bottom. Because the copper disc wasn't fully encapsulaed it's been reported that the copper will melt at high heat ruining the pan and also possibly your cook top.

The Everyday SS nonstick used Dupont Excalibur nonstick coating and the Chef's Classic nonstick uses the newer and supposedly better Quantanium nonstick cooking surface.

The Chef's Classic handles are also of a new and improved design which makes for less heat transfered to the loop handles.

Both perform about equally as far as cooking performance is concerned with the Chef's Classic possibly having a slight edge. Because of the CC's fully encapsulated bottom design the smaller pans have a slightly larger surface contacting the cooking surface.

We have a glass/ceramic cooking surface so you need to taske that into consideration also.

ChefJune 12-31-2006 10:16 AM

The original Chisinart cookware, that was made in France, when Sontheimer still owned the company, has a copper sandwich on the bottom that covers the whole bottom. I'm guessing this is what you are talking about -- the old Cuisinart cookware. Cuisinart has gone through a couple of different owners since Sontheimer sold the company, and the cookware is now made in Sri Lanka, I believe... The quality, altho good, is NOT the same as that wonderful old stuff.

In the early 90's many stores were clearing out the remainders of the original Cuisinart cookware, and if you picked some of that up, you have some great stuff. I have the 5 1/2 quart deep sauté and the Great Griddle, both of which I wouldn't trade for all the AllClad in the world!

Andy, your daughter is a lucky girl that you decided to part with yours. I wouldn't be that generous! :lol:

Andy M. 12-31-2006 10:41 AM

June, the disk bottomed stuff wasn't working for my on my gas stove. Too many scorched foods when the flame hit non-disk surface.

bluemack 12-31-2006 11:17 AM

yes, ChefJune, I do have the copper sandwiched Cuisinart ones, and the 5 1/2 quart saute pan too. No frying pan though. My stove is also ceramic. Thanks for the info.

Veloce 12-31-2006 11:24 AM

"Because the copper disc wasn't fully encapsulaed it's been reported that the copper will melt at high heat ruining the pan and also possibly your cook top."

The melting point of copper is 1083.0 °C (1356.15 K, 1981.4 °F). It's not going to melt on a residential (or commercial) range.

Robo410 12-31-2006 12:24 PM

quite right, real copper is not going to melt on the stove. but there are all these urban legends out there. "My ceramic stove overheated, melted my cast iron fry pan all over my fried chicken..." Now there are some thin pans sold at big lots etc which will melt when exposed to heat...I think they're only slightly thicker than a foil pie plate.

Ron W. 12-31-2006 12:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Veloce
"Because the copper disc wasn't fully encapsulaed it's been reported that the copper will melt at high heat ruining the pan and also possibly your cook top."

The melting point of copper is 1083.0 C (1356.15 K, 1981.4 F). It's not going to melt on a residential (or commercial) range.

In a link that someone recently posted here for an America's Test Kitchen testing of cookware ATK stated that Emerilware SS, which uses a copper disc, melted and bonded to the cooktop.

The high heat can also warp the cookware even if the copper core doesn't melt.

Andy M. 12-31-2006 12:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron W.
In a link that someone recently posted here for an America's Test Kitchen testing of cookware ATK stated that Emerilware SS, which uses a copper disc, melted and bonded to the cooktop.

The high heat can also warp the cookware even if the copper core doesn't melt.


Some time ago, I posted that info from a Consumer Reports magazine. The disk separated from the pan body and remained on the burner. It's not at all clear that it was because the copper melted as there is also aluminum in that disk and some attachment method for connecting the disk to the pan.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:47 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.