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quicksilver 06-27-2008 09:26 AM

Light bulbs and electricity
 
We all have post light fixtures at the end of our property here - required.
Out of 12 immediate area properties, 7 have decided not to replace their burned out bulbs, saying it's one more was they are reducing their electric usage. Well since all are on a light sensor, I say the electric is running 24/7, even if the bulb is "dead". I'm pretty sure if you stuck your finger in where the bulb is, ZZZZZZZZTTTTTTT!
The power is run not from each residence, but from public/association, so no switch to turn off at individual residence.
I say the only way to reduce usage is lower wattage/lumins.
Correct?

GB 06-27-2008 09:32 AM

I do not believe you are correct.

Wart 06-27-2008 09:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by quicksilver (Post 635282)
.... Well since all are on a light sensor, I say the electric is running 24/7, even if the bulb is "dead". I'm pretty sure if you stuck your finger in where the bulb is, ZZZZZZZZTTTTTTT!

Unless there is something wrong with the sensor, No.

I suspect there may be some 'bleed' through the switching but that would be the occasional electron.


Quote:

I say the only way to reduce usage is lower wattage/lumins.
Correct?
[/LEFT]
Current flow through a burnt out bulb?

Andy M. 06-27-2008 10:19 AM

If the light bulb is not drawing electricity, there is no useage. The filament in the bulb broke so the current cannot flow through. Zero electriciry being used.

quicksilver 06-27-2008 10:42 AM

Ok. I understand the bulb filament thing, but what makes the sensor keep working once the bulb is replaced.
If you unscrewed the bulb and put a testor in that
little brass/metal thing that the base of the bulb touches, wouldn't you get a reaction?
I don't have a testor, so I don't know. I don't plan on sticking my finger in there either.

zzrdvark 06-27-2008 11:26 AM

Yes, there's still power being supplied to the bulb when it's burned out, but since the filament is broken, there's no circuit being completed, and not power is being used.

quicksilver 06-27-2008 11:48 AM

Thanks, guys.
It still looks terrible.
And is unsafe out here in the dark.
And against assoc. rules, that no one is enforcing.

Does anyone have an idea on average how much $$ is really being saved daily, monthly, by not burning a 40watt bulb for say 10 hrs a day. (8pm -6am)?

Chief Longwind Of The North 06-27-2008 12:05 PM

For such a light, if it uses the standard light bulb size, it would be well worth the cost to purchase an LED light pulb fixture. Now understand that these bulbs are expensive, from what I understand, an LED (light emmiting diode) array the size of a standard incandescent light bulb runs about $90 U.S. But the LED bulbs don't burn out, and draw very little current. So over the life of the bulb, they pay for themselves fairly quickly, and run forever without replacement. In an outdoor environment, this is important.

Myself, I wish there were no streetlights in the neighbohood. They keep me from enjoying star filled skies, northern lights, meteor showers, etc. And besides, night is supposed to be dark! just MHO:cool:.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

GB 06-27-2008 12:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North (Post 635345)

Myself, I wish there were no streetlights in the neighbohood. They keep me from enjoying star filled skies, northern lights, meteor showers, etc. And besides, night is supposed to be dark! just MHO:cool:.

I hear what you are saying and I love seeing the stars and Milky Way and all the great things the night sky had to offer. However, when my daughter is coming home from her job late at night (once she reaches that age of course), I will want the area well lit so some pervert is not lurking in the shadows ready to do G-d knows what. I will happily trade visual wonderment for the safety of my kids. Then we will just vacation in the mountains and sleep out under the stars to see all that great stuff.

Chief Longwind Of The North 06-27-2008 12:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GB (Post 635347)
I hear what you are saying and I love seeing the stars and Milky Way and all the great things the night sky had to offer. However, when my daughter is coming home from her job late at night (once she reaches that age of course), I will want the area well lit so some pervert is not lurking in the shadows ready to do G-d knows what. I will happily trade visual wonderment for the safety of my kids. Then we will just vacation in the mountains and sleep out under the stars to see all that great stuff.

I perfectly understand what you are saying, and agree whole heartedly that there are areas where street lights provide a needed measure of safety. But my neighborhood hasn't had a single crime in it since it was created way back in the early 1950's, no theft, no violence, no anything. We are kind of tucked just out of site from the general population of our town, which is a very safe town to start with, and have a great bunch of people living in the subdivision. So we could afford more darkness.

Seeeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North


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