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-   -   Ina Garten's company pot roast (http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f14/ina-gartens-company-pot-roast-55915.html)

Phil 03-03-2009 04:04 PM

Ina Garten's company pot roast
 
If you don't try this, your missin' somethin' special. I'm sure there are several of you out there that make a pot roast along the lines of Ina's, but I never have. This is an outstanding meal. I used an average roast. Actually it had been frozen for eighteen months. I also cut down on the salt because of what I read in the reviews. I did not use the leaks because the store wanted $4.95 for the two. I did use a good wine and stuck to the rest of the recipe. I hope you try it. It's a five star dinner.
Comfort and Company : Barefoot Contessa : Food Network

Katie H 03-03-2009 04:09 PM

Phil, I saw the episode in which Ina prepared this dish and I practically drooled all over the TV. Nice to hear someone who has tried it and liked it.

Phil 03-03-2009 04:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Katie E (Post 798877)
Phil, I saw the episode in which Ina prepared this dish and I practically drooled all over the TV. Nice to hear someone who has tried it and liked it.

Katie, we drooled all over our plates while eating it. :lol:

Toots 03-03-2009 07:04 PM

I love Ina and I've tried several of her recipes with excellent results.

themonkeytree 03-03-2009 07:24 PM

I saw that episode and thought everything looked great. I think Ina cooks great food. The only problem I have with her show, is she uses a lot of specialty liquers that most people do not have, and would not buy for just one dish. I have no problem with her using those high end ingredients, but she could at least tell an alternative if you don't have the liquer she is using. I am fortunate enough to have a good selection of liquers and a neighbor that has an even bigger selection and has no problem letting me borrow some for a recipe. I mean I saw her use pear flavored brandy, and not many people are going to go out and buy pear flavored brandy for just one recipe.

CapitolHillCook 09-30-2011 09:53 AM

Bumping this older thread to get some advice on making the perfect pot roast. I've made this Barefoot Contessa recipe a half-dozen times now and it makes a ton of delicious sauce. My problem is inconsistent results with the roast itself: four times, I got exactly what I was looking for, the meat was soft and fork tender and falling apart. The two other times, including for an important dinner party last night, the roast was tough.

I follow the recipe exactly (except for less salt), browning the roast and starting the veggies/sauce on top of the stove, and then transferring to the oven. I use a terrific Staub cast-iron dutch oven, the one with the bumps on the lid interior that baste constantly. As instructed, I cook the pot roast at 325 for the first hour, and then turn it down to 250 for the next hour and a half. So I guess the essence of my question is, if the roast is still tough after 2.5 hrs, is the secret to just keep on cooking it longer??? Will it get tougher and drier, or softer and more tender if I just keep cooking and cooking and cooking???

Thanks for your advice, I'm really at my wit's end, and very disappointed that my dish wasn't perfect for my dinner party. :sad:

Andy M. 09-30-2011 10:00 AM

Generally speaking, a pot roast that's tough should be cooked longer. The key is to get the internal temperature of the roast to 190 F-200 F. At this temp, there is a breakdown of the fibers in the roast and the meat can be falling apart tender. So, yes, if you had cooked it longer, it probably wold have gotten tender.

Not knowing which cut of beef you used makes it harder to be sure. In my experience, the best cut for a pot roast is a boneless chuck roast. The perfect cut in many ways.

CapitolHillCook 09-30-2011 10:19 AM

Thanks Andy, yes, I've always used a boneless chuck roast. I am jotting down your advice right now on my recipe printout about getting the temp of the roast to 190 F-200 F so there is a breakdown of the fibers. I think that's where I went wrong in the past, because Ina Garten mentions taking the meat out when it hits 160, and I was worried about going beyond that. I'll just keep on cooking it longer in the future.

lyndalou 09-30-2011 02:01 PM

I made that, too. it was great. If I want to try something with one of the specialty liquors, I buy a mini bottle. It's usually just enough.

Lyndalou

jennyema 09-30-2011 03:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CapitolHillCook (Post 1054089)
Thanks Andy, yes, I've always used a boneless chuck roast. I am jotting down your advice right now on my recipe printout about getting the temp of the roast to 190 F-200 F so there is a breakdown of the fibers. I think that's where I went wrong in the past, because Ina Garten mentions taking the meat out when it hits 160, and I was worried about going beyond that. I'll just keep on cooking it longer in the future.


Thats odd that she should say that. There are some meats that have to be cooked to 190 or 200 to be tender and pot roast is one of them.

160 is only medium and that would spell disaster for pot roast.


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