Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums

Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums (http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/)
-   Desserts, Sweets & Cookies & Candy (http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f10/)
-   -   Creme Brulee Browning Tips? (http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f10/creme-brulee-browning-tips-60377.html)

201 alma st 09-24-2009 09:22 PM

Creme Brulee Browning Tips?
 
how do I get the this right without a torch

Silversage 09-25-2009 08:03 AM

Another method, besides the one kadesma mentioned.......

Make the caramel in a saucepan to the hard crack stage. Pour it over the top of the brulee and let it cool.

RWeb 10-13-2009 01:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Silversage (Post 852384)
Another method, besides the one kadesma mentioned.......

Make the caramel in a saucepan to the hard crack stage. Pour it over the top of the brulee and let it cool.

Actually this method sounds better than what I was going to suggest, which was to use an aerosol can and a match :) They made flame throwers for a reason ya know...

Nyeer 10-13-2009 09:32 AM

Ha! That was funny!! Wekcome RWeb

thymeless 10-13-2009 12:13 PM

For torch or broiler method, the sugar must be dry. As most of these also use brown sugar for part of the topping, that means you need to dry it out in the oven before hand.

ChefJune 10-13-2009 03:06 PM

It doesn't have to be dry. I have successfully bruleed Cranberry Sauce.

I also suggest getting a torch. It is the easiest and safest way to ensure a beautiful dish w/o danger to you and your home. I have always found the broiler to brulee unevenly. In many ovens, you can't get the dishes close enough to the broiling source.

A salamander is quite another story.

thymeless 10-13-2009 03:46 PM

Dry makes a lot of difference actually for brown sugar. And I only said sugar. Brown sugar starts to dry, then burns while the other bits are still drying out. You don't get the evenly cooked glass effect.

With something evenly wet/dissolved, it can work as you describe.

But brown sugar is fairly troubling under the torch if not dried beforehand.

LPBeier 10-13-2009 04:09 PM

Personally I use a full sized blow torch (what we were told at school to get because in restaurants they don't use the dainty gourmet shop ones) and had a professional welder teach me how to use it. His pay? Creme Brulee of course!

LPBeier 10-13-2009 04:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thymeless (Post 856144)
Dry makes a lot of difference actually for brown sugar. And I only said sugar. Brown sugar starts to dry, then burns while the other bits are still drying out. You don't get the evenly cooked glass effect.

With something evenly wet/dissolved, it can work as you describe.

But brown sugar is fairly troubling under the torch if not dried beforehand.

I have made lots of creme brulee in different flavours and only once have I ever seen brown sugar used instead of white on top (it is an apple brulee and very good but I don't remember drying the sugar). I do have a recipe I use at Christmas that is an eggnog brulee with crushed candy canes melted/burnt on top. Most of mine don't look like smooth glass but they taste good.

thymeless 10-13-2009 05:43 PM

I see a mix of brown and white sugar quite a bit. Color and molasses flavor that the brown sugar contributes.

Would be interesting to do a coconut brulee with palm sugar on top.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:57 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.