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-   -   Q: Meat sold in supermarkets (http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f14/q-meat-sold-in-supermarkets-69448.html)

jpinmaryland 01-06-2011 01:57 PM

Q: Meat sold in supermarkets
 
My dad's old girlfriend was pretty smart and knew alot about food and she told me one tip she learned when buying like chicken and pork was to tilt the package and see if the juices (watery red stuff) flowed downward, a lot of liquid like that was a bad sign. I asked some meat guy about it and he just shrugged. But I wonder if there is something to it?

I bought a slab of country ribs today and there was sure a lot of red liquid that flowed when I tilted the package enuf that it leaked out of the plastic, nasty...

I realize they have a process nowadays where they freeze the meat from the inside and then thaw it out when they put it on the shelves. These were refriegerated meats, not frozen but the package says you can freeze them.

ANy thoughts on seeing lots of liquid in refrigerated packages like this?

Rocklobster 01-06-2011 02:56 PM

Frozen meats will render juices when thawed due to destruction at the cellular level. Not neccessarily a bad thing, if they are selling it as pre frozen, which should be a bit cheaper IMHO.

Chef Munky 01-06-2011 03:17 PM

I think if it's been frozen, taken out to thaw in a refrigeration unit it's ok. To me it's just frozen condensation that's mingling with the meat juices.

Maybe what you picked up was bad packaging. Most place absorbent towels under the meat to catch the excess gross stuff.

I've bought whole packages of Tri tips, Standing rib roasts. From our local butcher. That have been aged. They usually have a little excess of ( don't know the wording ) of blood. It's never been a problem.

If I saw something like that at the grocery store. I'd be checking the date on the package.

Munky.

Uncle Bob 01-06-2011 03:36 PM

When I see a "leaker" in a retail grocery I first check for dates...then look for a package with no (or at least minimal) leakage....

jpinmaryland 01-06-2011 09:38 PM

These were probably poorly packaged as it was a special and I've seen it before at this store where they dont do a good job on wrapping the specials. I'll go and check the date but should be fine. they really looked nice.

fleitan 01-07-2011 12:09 PM

I think the worry with too much liquid is if it's from frozen ice which was on the meat - which usually means that the meat has been dried out, the moisture has escaped and frozen to the outer layar - basically I'm describing "freezer burn" - which renders the meat supernasty.

:sorcerer:The best way to freeze meat, as an aisde to this topic, is to freeze it for a few hours alone, wrapped in plastic wrap, and then remove the plastic and submerge it in water and freeze the water with the meat inside - then you get meat in an ice block, which will seal in all the moisture. Any "dehydrating" which takes place from the freezing at that point will impact the block of ice, and not the meat inside.

Im no expert, but I think this makes sense.

Zhizara 01-07-2011 12:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fleitan (Post 956621)
I think the worry with too much liquid is if it's from frozen ice which was on the meat - which usually means that the meat has been dried out, the moisture has escaped and frozen to the outer layar - basically I'm describing "freezer burn" - which renders the meat supernasty.

:sorcerer:The best way to freeze meat, as an aisde to this topic, is to freeze it for a few hours alone, wrapped in plastic wrap, and then remove the plastic and submerge it in water and freeze the water with the meat inside - then you get meat in an ice block, which will seal in all the moisture. Any "dehydrating" which takes place from the freezing at that point will impact the block of ice, and not the meat inside.

Im no expert, but I think this makes sense.

Thanks, Fleitan for the great tip. I'll make sense to do it that way when I finally buy that whole beef tenderloin!:chef:

taxlady 01-07-2011 03:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zhizara (Post 956628)
Thanks, Fleitan for the great tip. I'll make sense to do it that way when I finally buy that whole beef tenderloin!:chef:

While the method will probably prevent freezer burn, you will have very wet meat. Meat that has been washed can go off a lot faster than nice dry meat. You would probably be shortening its defrosted shelf life a lot. If I were you, I would experiment with a small piece of inexpensive meat, not big chunks of an expensive tenderloin.

Zhizara 01-07-2011 03:42 PM

Thanks, TL.

CWS4322 01-07-2011 06:36 PM

I used to by chicken legs with backs attached from a restaurant supplier (unfortunately, the company went out of business a couple of years ago). Well, knowing that grocery stores buy from the same wholesalers as restaurant suppliers, the last time the local supermarket had chicken legs with backs attached on special, I asked the manager if I could just buy the whole box (rather than have the staff bag the legs into 10# bags). These were fresh and yes, I got not only one, but two boxes <g>.

Never hurts to ask. And, some restaurant and grocery store suppliers will sell "off the street" meaning you don't have to have a commercial business to take advantage of the savings, just need to be able to store the food.


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