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-   -   Surface finish for griddle? (http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f89/surface-finish-for-griddle-7378.html)

lime 02-08-2005 03:32 PM

Surface finish for griddle?
 
I recently purchased a new stove with a griddle. The surface has some tooling marks in it. How smooth should the surface be for optimum cooking?

kitchenelf 02-08-2005 04:01 PM

Do you mean scratches? I'm not sure what you mean by tooling marks but someone else might.

lime 02-08-2005 04:06 PM

The scratches that come from the big grinding equipment at the manufacturer, where they grind flat the surface. Prior to seasoning the surface I was wondering if I should further grind the surface to make it as smooth as possible or if the grind marks some how aid in cooking. My intial thoughs are they would cause food to stick.

kitchenelf 02-08-2005 04:09 PM

I guess I'm just not familiar with what you are talking about. What kind of material is the griddle? Cast iron?

lime 02-08-2005 04:30 PM

I would guess it is made a medium carbon steel. Think of it as a piece of wood sanded with very coarse sand paper. The surface will be rough. As you progress through finer and finer sand paper the surface will get smoother and smoother. The same is true of steel. You can have the semi rough finish as it comes from the factory or you can "sand" it with finer and finer paper until it will become almost mirror like. I've seen some cooking pans that have a textured finish that claim to be superior cooking surfaces. he question for the griddle is, "Is smoother better for cooking?"

norgeskog 02-08-2005 06:55 PM

I purchased a cast iron griddle/grill which covers two burners. It is a grill on one side that can put grill marks on meats; the other is great for pancakes, burgers, or whatever for a crowd. I have grilled corn on the cob which turns out great. It took me a long time to season this thing as it has two cooking side, but I love it. I also have a non-stick coated one II use occasionally, but plan to get rid of it.

Michael in FtW 02-08-2005 07:25 PM

I understand your explanation of finishing marks in metals ... but the question really goes back to 3 things: (1) what kind of metal, (2) how deep are the grinding marks, (3) what does the manual that came with your new "gizmo" say?

lime 02-09-2005 07:11 AM

I can't determine the exact type of steel other than it is a carbon steel. If you drag your finger nail across the surface you can easily detect the grinding marks. The manual only mentions the cleaning and seasoning of the surface.

kitchenelf 02-09-2005 10:17 AM

I'm inclined to think that it won't affect the cooking at all. If you have to drag your fingernail over it to detect it then I doubt it would be a problem. I'm sure the surface is smooth enough to cook on. But heck, I wouldn't listen to me - I'm just now beginning to understand what you're talking about!! :oops:

Why don't you call customer service for the manufacturer of your stove?

buckytom 02-09-2005 10:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lime
I can't determine the exact type of steel other than it is a carbon steel. If you drag your finger nail across the surface you can easily detect the grinding marks. The manual only mentions the cleaning and seasoning of the surface.

lol, don't you end up burning your fingers?
just kidding.

i would do as elfie says and call the manufacturer. they'll know if it's a defect in the manufacturing process, or that's the way they all start out.


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