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GLC 03-04-2012 07:40 AM

Salt Cod
 
I have managed, for all these years, to have never used salt cod. But thinking about how much of a staple it is in the Caribbean where people are surrounded by excellent fresh fish, I figured there must be something more to it than preserved fish that people got a taste for during slave days. So, last night, I made cod cakes. They were quite good, very mild. While soaking the fish for a day and a half though many changes of water, I was struck that there was no fishiness at all after it was cured. I'll try another dish this week, if anyone has a suggestion.

Gravy Queen 03-04-2012 07:41 AM

Well done on having a go! I havent had salt cod for years, but its gorgeous. We used to have it many years ago on a Sunday morning for breakfast, my Dad would bring it home from the fish market he worked in.
Isnt there a delicious recipe using this making balls, I can't remember the proper name.

CraigC 03-04-2012 07:58 AM

Hey, we never tried it until recently. Both the dishes we made were not bad. Being a spearfisherman, used to having really fresh fish, I never thought I would like it.

Steve Kroll 03-04-2012 08:49 AM

I've had Salt Cod in Spain (where it's usually called bacalao) but have never seen it in this country, or at least not at the grocers. Was it something you purchased locally, or did you have to order it online somewhere?

Aunt Bea 03-04-2012 08:53 AM

I get Canadian salt cod in the wooden box at any large grocery or dried cod in bulk at the local Italian market.

I enjoy making the traditional New England creamed cod fish over baked potatoes in the winter.

CraigC 03-04-2012 08:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steve Kroll (Post 1115186)
I've had Salt Cod in Spain (where it's usually called bacalao) but have never seen it in this country, or at least not at the grocers. Was it something you purchased locally, or did you have to order it online somewhere?

There are many places locally that carry it. It was the Italian name version of bacalao, lol.

Steve Kroll 03-04-2012 09:00 AM

Ahhh... never thought of checking the Italian deli. Thanks for the tip!

Addie 03-04-2012 09:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aunt Bea (Post 1115187)
I get Canadian salt cod in the wooden box at any large grocery or dried cod in bulk at the local Italian market.

I enjoy making the traditional New England creamed cod fish over baked potatoes in the winter.

My favorite way to use it. On July 4th it is a New England tradition. I add petite peas to the white sauce. Sometimes along with the Haddock, my husband, along with some of the other fishermen, would hang it up in the rigging and the salt air and waves would do their job. By the time the boat came into dock, you would see a whole bunch of cod filet sides hanging there. Once you rehydrate it, you can cut it into small pieces of filets and bread them and cook them like any other fish. Like Aunt Bea, you can buy it in bulk and use it a little at a time. It will keep and there is no odor. That's the best way to buy it. You have bigger pieces to make a lot of dishes. It is great in fish stew along with other fish and shell fish. You just have to make sure you soak it and change the water a lot of times until all the salt is cleaned out. I used to break it into pieces suitable for breading, and store it in a large gallon jar. By the time I used it, the kids thought they were getting "white chicken" and had no idea it came from that nasty stuff in the jar. :yum:

taxlady 03-04-2012 10:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CraigC (Post 1115168)
Hey, we never tried it until recently. Both the dishes we made were not bad. Being a spearfisherman, used to having really fresh fish, I never thought I would like it.

Okay then, I'll give it a try. I seldom eat fish because I don't live near the ocean (I only like salt water fish). I got really spoiled with fresh fish in Copenhagen. A Norwegian friend told stories about awful salt cod. I now suspect that it was more a question of how his mum cooked it. Other stories indicated that she wasn't a very good cook.

GLC 03-04-2012 02:40 PM

There was an issue of Saveur a while back that had a lot of Caribbean recipes, a number of them based on salt cod. After trying it, i can see why, long after the days when it was a cheap imported protein for slaves, it was retained. It could indeed sub for chicken in a lot of dishes, there being no distinct fish taste.

I think I will try the cream cod with peas over potatoes. I also find the Canadian salt cod in the wooden box in the grocery for about the same price as the previously frozen cod. The size of the cuts in the box and the size of the frozen are rather small, reflecting the truth that they are being fished out. We should begin demanding the more sustainable Pacific cod, line caught.

Also, I assume salt pollock is very similar. Less common in the US than cod, but I'll start harassing the fish manager. The fish managers at my grocery (HEB) apparently do get heard by corporate. They caught a lot of hell for the poor quality of the tuna they were getting from a new supplier, and corporate went back to the old one. So it's worth a shot.

For those more experienced, is there any great differences among sources of salt cod? I have one local source, and it's for the Canadian cod in the box. I can get other brands on line, but for much higher prices.

Oh, looking around, I find this recipe. Sounds good.
Cod Brandade Recipe - Saveur.com


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