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Claire 04-25-2012 07:03 AM

Timing of dishes
 
I'm going to have to post this several places, I guess, since few visit this site.

I am cooking a brunch for a half-dozen people. My husband wants quiche, which isn't my favorite. Every time I've made it it has taken much longer than expected. He wants one tourtiere and a quiche. I will do it, but does anyone know a rather fail-safe recipe for the quiche? I'm thinking a mushroom. Husband wants a spinach, but no matter how I squish it, it winds up too watery.

Help is needed in timing this all. I can do tourtiere backwards and forwards, I've bought the crusts for all of it. It's the quiche that I'm concerned about.

PrincessFiona60 04-25-2012 07:26 AM

I have a "flour sack" dishtowel I reserve for squishing spinach. I lay it in the colander and defrost frozen chopped spinach or pour in my freshly blanched spinach. Once it is defrosted/drained, I cover with the towel and press it. When I can no longer get any liquid from the spinach, I pull up the 4 corners, creating a bag and then wring the towel with the spinach inside. It is almost as dry as sawdust when I get done.

Depending on if you use cream or milk (lower>higher water content) the timing can vary. 30 - 60 minutes at 375F. Check at 10 min intervals. Hope this helps a bit!

taxlady 04-25-2012 07:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 (Post 1132051)
I have a "flour sack" dishtowel I reserve for squishing spinach. I lay it in the colander and defrost frozen chopped spinach or pour in my freshly blanched spinach. Once it is defrosted/drained, I cover with the towel and press it. When I can no longer get any liquid from the spinach, I pull up the 4 corners, creating a bag and then wring the towel with the spinach inside. It is almost as dry as sawdust when I get done.

Depending on if you use cream or milk (lower>higher water content) the timing can vary. 30 - 60 minutes at 375F. Check at 10 min intervals. Hope this helps a bit!

Does cream make it quicker?

PrincessFiona60 04-25-2012 07:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by taxlady (Post 1132058)
Does cream make it quicker?

Yes, it has a lower water content to cook out.

Cerise 04-25-2012 10:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Claire (Post 1132046)
I'm going to have to post this several places, I guess, since few visit this site.

I am cooking a brunch for a half-dozen people. My husband wants quiche, which isn't my favorite. Every time I've made it it has taken much longer than expected. He wants one tourtiere and a quiche. I will do it, but does anyone know a rather fail-safe recipe for the quiche? I'm thinking a mushroom. Husband wants a spinach, but no matter how I squish it, it winds up too watery.

Help is needed in timing this all. I can do tourtiere backwards and forwards, I've bought the crusts for all of it. It's the quiche that I'm concerned about.

Re timing, you could make the quiche ahead.

Re watery, are you using fresh of frozen spinach, do you layer the ingredients or mix them all together? Crust or crustless? Frozen premade crust, or from scratch? What kind of pan?

You could sub asparagus etc. for the spinach. If you're not "sold" on quiche, you might do a (make-ahead) strata -- spinach/tomatoes/mozzarella, etc.).

Can you share your recipe, & maybe we can troubleshoot the problem(s)?

Aunt Bea 04-25-2012 03:52 PM

I use the towel squeeze method that PF mentioned. I also fluff up the spinach and toss it with a T of flour, cornstarch or breadcrumbs as a little extra insurance. If you have a potato ricer that also works very nicely in squeezing out the moisture. As far as timing, a quiche can sit for an extra cocktail or two and be eaten at room temp. so I would not be too concerned about exact timing.

Claire 04-26-2012 06:05 AM

Thanks so much. I plan on using frozen chopped spinach ... and have a couple of cotton towels I don't mind parting with. But tossing with flour/cornstarch wouldn't occur to me, and using heavy cream rather than milk or half-and-half makes sense, as it thickens with cooking by itself. I'll give a post-mortem!

Yes, part of the reason for quiche and tourtiere is that both are perfectly good at room temperature (or even cold for that matter). So if my friends get carried away in conversation (not unusual) it'll still be good.

buckytom 04-26-2012 09:44 AM

to me, quiche is like lasagna: it's better the next day, so make it the day before.

and lol, fee. spinach flavoured sawdust, mmmmmm. :wink:

but really, using well squished frozen spinach is best for removing as much moisture as possible. freezing helps to dry it out a bit, then squich the crap out of it with an old hand towel.

taxlady 04-26-2012 09:47 AM

Has frozen spinach gotten better since the last time I bought, back in the '80s? Man, that stuff was full of stems and disreputable looking leaves.

PrincessFiona60 04-26-2012 06:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by taxlady (Post 1132436)
Has frozen spinach gotten better since the last time I bought, back in the '80s? Man, that stuff was full of stems and disreputable looking leaves.

Yes, much better. I rarely buy the chopped, that's what usually looks all stemmy.

Most often I buy the fresh baby spinach. When it's on sale, I stock up and just toss it in the freezer.


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