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-   -   Saute? Fry? What's the difference? (http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f17/saute-fry-whats-the-difference-83963.html)

taxlady 01-23-2013 12:05 PM

Saute? Fry? What's the difference?
 
What do you consider is the difference between frying and sauteing?

Rocklobster 01-23-2013 12:11 PM

I consider sauteing as cooking things on med high heat, stirring or moving the ingredients around, usually in preparation to add more stuff to incorporate everything into one dish.
I consider frying as a method to cook something then take it out of the oil or butter and eat it like that, usually on high(ish) heat. Usually promoting some kind of browning or crisping, Like an egg or piece of meat, etc....
But, then again, what do I know??:p

mmyap 01-23-2013 12:12 PM

I always thought it was the amount of fat used and the temperature was higher if you were frying. Interesting question. I wonder how far off he mark I am. =o)

roadfix 01-23-2013 12:14 PM

I always thought it was just a fancy term for frying.

pacanis 01-23-2013 12:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by taxlady (Post 1231937)
What do you consider is the difference between frying and sauteing?

One you can use EVOO and the other you can't.
:rofl:

I'm pretty sure they are either interchangeable or overlap some... possibly a lot. At least to me. Sauteed foods I may tend to move around more in the pan more.

GLC 01-23-2013 12:57 PM

The difference is the source of heat working on the food.

I think of saute as cooking something using primarily the direct heat of the pan in contact with the food, any fat that is used being present to lubricate the pan, since it usually refers to smaller pieces of food that will be moved about and would otherwise tend to stick.

Frying, then, is cooking by contact with hot fat, essentially a high heat alternative to boiling, those temperatures being impossible with water.

The terms are sometimes blurred. A "fried" steak is usually actually sauteed, rather than cooked by immersion in hot oil. Bacon, however, cooking in a pan, is truly fried, since it quickly generates the fat that does the cooking. And I think it will always be "fried" egg, remembering that classic fried eggs are cooked in considerably more fat than you often see today.

Kayelle 01-23-2013 01:08 PM

At first I thought it was the amount of fat, but you "fry an egg" and "saute sliced mushrooms" in the same amount of fat. Maybe it's moving the food around for saute? One would never say I'm going to saute an egg. Hmmm, just one more thing to confuse me. Thanks a bunch Taxi. :glare::wink:

justplainbill 01-23-2013 01:10 PM

For us the difference is well over $100 between the cost of our 6 quart saute pan and our 14" frying pan.

Oldvine 01-23-2013 01:29 PM

I usually think of sauteing when I'm going to end up with some sauce around little pieces like mushrooms or onions. If I'm frying something, I think it's going to end up sort of, hopefully, with some crispy areas.

Andy M. 01-23-2013 01:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GLC (Post 1231946)
The difference is the source of heat working on the food.

I think of saute as cooking something using primarily the direct heat of the pan in contact with the food, any fat that is used being present to lubricate the pan, since it usually refers to smaller pieces of food that will be moved about and would otherwise tend to stick.

Frying, then, is cooking by contact with hot fat, essentially a high heat alternative to boiling, those temperatures being impossible with water...

This is my understanding of the difference.


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