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CWS4322 04-03-2013 01:26 PM

What do you do with...
 
Drove the DH to the airport yesterday. I don't get over that way often...on my way home, I noticed an Asian grocery store (T&T Supermarket). Well, I happened to be out of srirachi sauce and sesame oil. Of course I ended up with some other things...

What do you do with...

Dried Shrimp (I know someone -- AndyM maybe -- posted about using those)
Dried Kelp
Basic black seeds (I "think" they are onion seeds)
Extra firm tofu

I almost picked up those shrimp crackers Snip posted about, but resisted. And, I resisted getting fresh whole squid (the fish/seafood counter is to die for--they even have tanks of live fish swimming around)--I don't have time to clean squid or fish, maybe when I get done with this project. And, FRESH LIVE CRAB!!!!!! and Lobster (Rock--this place is on Hunt Club and Riverside--and they had fresh duck for around $14-16). Too bad the DH's flight gets in at 12:45 a.m. But I now know where to go for fresh fish and seafood.

Andy M. 04-03-2013 01:46 PM

I use dried shrimp in my pad thai recipe. It's posted here if you are interested.

EF Tofu can be used in any number of recipes. I use it in hot and sour soup. You can also marinate and pan fry it.

Steve Kroll 04-03-2013 02:09 PM

"Basic black seeds" are more than likely kalonji/nigella. They're used quite a bit in Indian cooking. Sometimes they are also just used more decoratively - for example, you occasionally see them sprinkled on naan bread.

Dried kelp I bought once. I really don't care for the flavor myself. It's a good source of iodine, so many people just add it to other foods. I've read you can also steam it as a side dish, although I can't imagine eating it like that.

Cerise 04-03-2013 02:27 PM

You might add the dried shrimp to a Gumbo.

For the tofu - one of my favorite dishes is an eggplant tofu stir-fry (w/ peanut sauce). This could be a starting point:

Stir-fried Eggplant and Tofu Recipe | MyRecipes.com

We have an Asian market (w/ live seafood) here called 99. I will have to make another trip there soon.

CWS4322 04-03-2013 04:11 PM

Perfect, Cerise! I have an eggplant that needs to be eaten! And all the other ingredients as well! Guess what I'm making tonight!

GotGarlic 04-03-2013 06:12 PM

I have a recipe for Thai papaya salad that includes dried shrimp and I've had tofu in miso soup and stir-fries. I have no experience with the other ingredients.

CWS4322 04-03-2013 06:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GotGarlic (Post 1254942)
I have a recipe for Thai papaya salad that includes dried shrimp and I've had tofu in miso soup and stir-fries. I have no experience with the other ingredients.

Can you post or PM me the Thai papaya salad recipe?

buckytom 04-03-2013 06:45 PM

shred and add the dried kelp to eggdrop soup,. it's delicious and healthy.

as andy mentioned, the dried shrimp are good in a pad thai like noodle dish, topped with a squirt or two of sriracha and some black sesame.

they're also good in thai veggie soup along with the tofu.

how about kimbap (aka gimbap). steamed rice and usually some other ingredient like tuna folded into the sheets of dried kelp.

yum, now i want korean food.

CWS4322 04-03-2013 06:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steve Kroll (Post 1254898)
"Basic black seeds" are more than likely kalonji/nigella. They're used quite a bit in Indian cooking. Sometimes they are also just used more decoratively - for example, you occasionally see them sprinkled on naan bread.

Dried kelp I bought once. I really don't care for the flavor myself. It's a good source of iodine, so many people just add it to other foods. I've read you can also steam it as a side dish, although I can't imagine eating it like that.

I find the kelp "chips" somewhat salty. In the Maritimes, Dulse is sold as if it were potato chips. I don't mind the taste. Although, I think it is probably like Scotch, an acquired taste :wink:.

I ate a two or three "kelp chips" last night. I'm thinking of grinding some of them into powder and adding the powder to soups and things.

I've seen the seeds used on an Indian cooking show I watch. I think they are onion seeds (or onion seeds can be substituted for them). I will ping my friend who is married to a guy from Bombay and ask how she uses them (and check my Indian cookbooks) now that I have another name for them. Thanks, Steve.

It is so much fun going in an ethnic food store! At least this store had the information in English and ... I think Chinese. They have an amazing array of prepared foods...and a Dim Sum takeout counter.

buckytom 04-03-2013 07:10 PM

if the kelp isn't large enough to roll or fold, grind it into flakes, add dried bonito flakes (or grind some of your dried shrimp), add black and white sesame seeds, sugar, and salt to taste ro make furikake; a topping to be sprinkled onto sticky rice.

i like to add hot peeper flakes to mine as well to give it some kick.


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