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-   -   Applesauce -- to peel or not to peel? (http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f30/applesauce-to-peel-or-not-to-peel-91177.html)

ShellyCooks 10-10-2014 01:11 AM

Applesauce -- to peel or not to peel?
 
Hi Everyone ~
My old apple tree has given me a ton of apples this year. They are small, but good. I want to make applesauce for the freezer. In the past, I have always peeled the apples, but now I notice a lot of recipes do not require peeled apples. Has anyone made applesauce without peeling the apples? Any comments would be appreciated. Thanks!

Kayelle 10-10-2014 01:24 AM

I can't imagine peelings in my finished applesauce Shelly. I guess you could use a food mill to remove the skins after cooking the apples.

ShellyCooks 10-10-2014 01:32 AM

That's what I thought, too, Kayelle, but the recipes I've found say to put the cooked unpeeled apples into a food processor and process until smooth. I may make a small batch with peels on just to see how it turns out. I realize that the apple skins add fiber and more vitamins, but ........? I'll let you know what I think of this rustic applesauce.

Aunt Bea 10-10-2014 05:08 AM

I peel the apples and leave the pieces quite large so the apple sauce is lumpy or chunky when finished.

I have made it without peeling the apples and then running the finished applesauce through a Foley food mill to remove the skins and seeds. I don't really like the ultra smooth texture in the finished product.

I would never make it and leave the skins in the finished product.

If you decide to peel and core the apples save the "apple junk" and make a small batch of apple jelly!

This is one of many recipes for Apple Peel Jelly!

http://foodpreservation.about.com/od...ScrapJelly.htm

Good luck!

Addie 10-10-2014 05:41 AM

Some of the red apples that are grown for cooking add that red color you see in pink applesauce. And as stated, they add additional nutrients and fiber. If you don't like the final product when the cooking is done, then put it through a food mill. Good Luck. :angel:

ShellyCooks 10-10-2014 08:40 AM

Thanks, Aunt Bea and Addie, for the suggestions. I like the idea of making apple jelly from the apple scraps. I, too, like chunky applesauce. I'll try making a small batch with skins on and if I don't like it, I'll do as you suggest, Addie, and use a food mill. Thanks, again! I'll be busy this weekend!!

bethzaring 10-10-2014 09:55 AM

When I make apple sauce I use the whole apple, minus the stem. I cook the snot out of the apples. When I run the cooked pulp through the china cap/chinoises strainer, only the seed coats stay behind.

Dawgluver 10-10-2014 10:21 AM

I've done it both ways with good results. I have a couple of those apple whirly corer-peeler-slicer things, and they really help cut down on labor.

Addie 10-10-2014 12:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dawgluver (Post 1392399)
I've done it both ways with good results. I have a couple of those apple whirly corer-peeler-slicer things, and they really help cut down on labor.

Me too! I love mine. Apples peeled in seconds. And you have the option of it making slices or just remove the core along with the peelings. Or you can just remove the core! Poo got it for me many years ago as a gift. What a great kid. :angel:

Dawgluver 10-10-2014 12:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Addie (Post 1392403)
Me too! I love mine. Apples peeled in seconds. And you have the option of it making slices or just remove the core along with the peelings. Or you can just remove the core! Poo got it for me many years ago as a gift. What a great kid. :angel:


And over the years they've really come down in price. The first one I got many years ago was something like $25, a few years ago I found another one for $7. With my extremely prolific tree, the work goes quickly with two of us peeling.

Addie 10-10-2014 01:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dawgluver (Post 1392406)
And over the years they've really come down in price. The first one I got many years ago was something like $25, a few years ago I found another one for $7. With my extremely prolific tree, the work goes quickly with two of us peeling.

I have one that clamps to the edge of the counter or table. I am not to fond of that feature. I have often looked at the ones with the suction cup, but wonder if they are better than the clamp. You almost have to bore a hole in the underneath for the clamp to really take hold. I have tried putting a wet cloth under the clamp. Not much better. :angel:

Dawgluver 10-10-2014 01:05 PM

Applesauce -- to peel or not to peel?
 
Mine have suction cups, I like them.

ShellyCooks 10-10-2014 06:56 PM

Okay --- I just made a batch of applesauce without peeling the apples. I put the cooked apples in my food processor and pulsed them until they were broken down, but still a little chunky. I added cinnamon and a little honey. Actually, I like it -- it is a little bit chewy, a nice texture, and I think the skins make it tasty.
I'll make another batch with peels on and then one or two batches without. You're right, Addie and Dawgluver, I should buy an apple peeler. Back to the apples ......

Addie 10-10-2014 08:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ShellyCooks (Post 1392472)
Okay --- I just made a batch of applesauce without peeling the apples. I put the cooked apples in my food processor and pulsed them until they were broken down, but still a little chunky. I added cinnamon and a little honey. Actually, I like it -- it is a little bit chewy, a nice texture, and I think the skins make it tasty.
I'll make another batch with peels on and then one or two batches without. You're right, Addie and Dawgluver, I should buy an apple peeler. Back to the apples ......

When I don't use my peeler, I have a serrated manual peeler and I more often than not will peel one continuous strip to the end. Yeah, I like to show off my skills in the kitchen. But if you are going to be doing these apples each year, then you definitely need an automatic peeler. :angel:

Mad Cook 10-11-2014 06:07 PM

I've never made apple sauce with the peel left on, either to eat or to freeze(well, you know what I mean) but having read your replies I think I might give it a go. It'll save a lot of bother and if the peel adds to the flavour so much the better.

ShellyCooks 10-11-2014 09:08 PM

I hadn't made applesauce with peels either, Mad Cook, but I tried it and now I have 10 pint jars in the freezer. I like the chewy texture and taste. You can process the apples in your food processor to either chunky, smooth, or somewhere in between. I still have a large bucket full of apples. I'm going to make more applesauce and apple breads. The frozen applesauce can be used later (Thanksgiving, etc.) to make delicious applesauce cake. Try a small batch, Mad
Cook, and see if you like it.

Aunt Bea 10-12-2014 04:41 AM

Try using a thin layer of applesauce on these instead of the date jam. :yum:

http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...ars-87557.html

ShellyCooks 10-12-2014 06:31 AM

Good idea, Aunt Bea. I'll save the Date Bar recipe and give it a try using applesauce instead of date jam. Sounds yummy! Thanks for sharing!

Mad Cook 10-12-2014 07:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ShellyCooks (Post 1392704)
I hadn't made applesauce with peels either, Mad Cook, but I tried it and now I have 10 pint jars in the freezer. I like the chewy texture and taste. You can process the apples in your food processor to either chunky, smooth, or somewhere in between. I still have a large bucket full of apples. I'm going to make more applesauce and apple breads. The frozen applesauce can be used later (Thanksgiving, etc.) to make delicious applesauce cake. Try a small batch, Mad Cook, and see if you like it.

Sadly, my two apple trees haven't had even one apple between them this year although they did quite well last year. No blossom either so it could be old age because they were mature trees when my parents bought the house 50+ years ago. They are both James Grieve which is a "dual purpose" apple - a bit sharp in flavour but useful for eating and for cooking.

If I make any apple sauce this year it will be with Bramley's Seedling cooking apples from the greengrocer's (ie fruit and veg shop). It isn't grown anywhere else in the world (at least, I didn't think so until I looked at Wikipaedia Bramley apple - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - there are a few growers producing them in the US and Canada). It's a very sour cooking apple and it "falls" when cooked so great for puree but not much use if you like your apple pies chunky. Lovely flavour though.

It has an interesting history. All Bramley apples, wherever in the world they are grown, are descended from a tree grown from a seed in 1809 which is still growing in a garden in Southwell (pron: Suthell!!) in Nottinghamshire, just round the corner from my cousins' house.

If you wanted to try them in north America I would think you are more likely to see them on a farmers' market than in a run-of-the-mill supermarket.

ShellyCooks 10-12-2014 08:13 PM

Sorry that you didnt get any apples from your trees this year, Mad Cook. It could be the weather. I know, here in California, the weather has a great deal to do with fruit trees and crops.

Wow! What an interesting history about the Bramley apple and the original is alive and well! I have never heard of these apples, but will look for them at our local farmers' market.

Let us know if you try making applesauce with the peels on!


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