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Old 09-28-2021, 07:03 AM   #1
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Lodge Deep Skillet - Cooking dessert

My wife requested this deep skillet: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

We're in the process of seasoning it (multiple cycles), and haven't used it yet. I'm thinking it's inauguration could be a nice camp dutch oven style cake dessert (oven or stove), before we move on to stews. One caveat: for some reason my family doesn't seem to like cobblers, a trait definitely not passed down by me.

Would dutch oven recipes work in this? Any recommended recipes?

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Old 09-28-2021, 07:39 AM   #2
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Sounds like you are getting into Cast Iron Cooking! LOL I love all of mine - not a big collection but very happy with them!

I've also gotten a couple of magazine recipe books that are unfortunately still lost in the jungle of boxes in storage.

Google and you will find a plethora of places to check out, such as:

country living

bonappetit

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Old 09-28-2021, 08:46 AM   #3
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This would work as a dutch oven. Happy Cooking!
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Old 09-28-2021, 11:28 AM   #4
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There are three types of Dutch ovens, enameled cast iron, fore use on a stovetop, or in the oven - https://www.google.com/search?q=Lodg...ih=567&dpr=1.1

cast iron Dutch oven, used on stovetop, in oven, or on campfire, or over charcoal, needs to be seasoned - https://www.lodgecastiron.com/produc...oven?sku=L2SP3

Camp Dutch oven has legs to stabilize it and allow hot coals, or embers to be placed under it. The lid is shaped to hold hot embers, or charcoal on top, providing heat from both the top and bottom, turning it into a camp oven. You can make everything from soups, to lasagna, to cakes, cobblers, even some iterations of pie in it. example - https://www.lodgecastiron.com/produc...oven?sku=L8CO3

Note: even the enameled Dutch oven can be used over fire. However, to make it easy to clean up any soot deposited from the fire, rub the outside ot the Dutch oven to completely cover the sides, and bottom with Ivory Soap. The soot will wash off easily, with almost no effort.

All of the Dutch ovens will make great cobblers, crisps (like apple crisp), dump cakes, Betties, puddings, and other deserts. They are also great for stewing, braising, roasting, and simmering. You can make a great turkey dressing in a Dutch oven, or rustic bread. Chicken and dumplings, anyone? If using cast iron Dutch ovens, they must be well seasoned to prevent food from sticking, and isolate acidic, or alkali foods from the base metal.

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Old 09-28-2021, 11:56 AM   #5
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Sounds like you are getting into Cast Iron Cooking! LOL I love all of mine - not a big collection but very happy with them!
Yes, I suppose I am! In my short experience, there are a lot of positives to it over other types, and not a lot of negatives. My first was a flat skillet I bought to pan sear steaks on, then started cooking my eggs on it.

Wife wanted a 12" pan to replace her warped SS Calphalon, so we got her a CS that she seems to have taken well to.

We're slowly buying more, but so far I don't think we've gotten rid of any of the old stuff that's supposed to get replaced. The cabinets are filling up!

I'm not really sure what's given me more interest in cooking in the last couple years. Maybe I'm just bored and want to try new things.

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I've also gotten a couple of magazine recipe books that are unfortunately still lost in the jungle of boxes in storage.

Google and you will find a plethora of places to check out, such as:

country living

bonappetit

tasteofhome
Thanks for these. I've found a couple recipes. Since my family has limited preferences, I think we're going to try out monkey bread first.
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Old 09-28-2021, 12:07 PM   #6
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You certainly don't have to eschew all other types of cookware because you like CI. In addition to CI, I have Teflon coated pans and air-ply SS pans. I use them all.
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Old 09-28-2021, 12:29 PM   #7
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You certainly don't have to eschew all other types of cookware because you like CI. In addition to CI, I have Teflon coated pans and air-ply SS pans. I use them all.
Oh, I'm not eschewing SS or CS. But the SS pans we have are hand-me-downs, some are warped, and need replacement anyway. Might as well do something new.

The exception for me would be teflon, having to replace them every few years, no matter how careful we are. As an environmentally conscious person, I think it's wasteful, and I want utensils that will last me the rest of my life.

As a side, I also dabble in classic woodworking, using manual tools, and no electricity. Maybe there's some romanticism to it, but I just prefer old style to modern. Same when working on my cars; Gimme an old wrench before pneumatic or electric.
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Old 09-28-2021, 12:45 PM   #8
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Save some of those other types of pots and pans. When you get older, you may find that you no longer enjoy picking up those heavy cast iron ones.
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Old 09-28-2021, 01:00 PM   #9
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Have you considered Tarte Tatin? Or is that skillet too deep?
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Old 09-28-2021, 01:07 PM   #10
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Have you considered Tarte Tatin? Or is that skillet too deep?
Basically an upside-down tart apple pie? I'm up for it!
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Old 09-28-2021, 01:38 PM   #11
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Basically an upside-down tart apple pie? I'm up for it!
the best demo I´ve ever seen is by Gordon Ramsay. He was first trained as a pastry chef in France, and this demo is just great. Not an easy one to master, but worth giving it a go.
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Old 09-28-2021, 03:51 PM   #12
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Off topic, but related: If your really up for trying something new to you, you won't be disappointed with a high quality carbon steel wok. Talk about a versatile cooking vessel; I've used mine for deep frying, stir fry, braising, boiling, simmering, as an omelet pan, for making rice, pasta, chili, all kinds of Asian recipes, making popcorn, steaming rice, steaming tamales, etc. The wok is seasoned just like cast iron, and most of the same benefits. The difference is that the bottom of the wok can get blistering hot, while the shape rapidly dissipates heat so that food can be pushed onto the cooler sides to avoid overcooking. carbon steel doesn't have the thermal mass of cast iron, and so doesn't store heat as well. However, that same property allows it to absorb heat from the source faster, and so, if you have a sufficient heat source, you can still sear foods beautifully.
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Old 09-28-2021, 04:03 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by karadekoolaid View Post
the best demo I´ve ever seen is by Gordon Ramsay. He was first trained as a pastry chef in France, and this demo is just great. Not an easy one to master, but worth giving it a go.
The crème anglaise, does that get poured on the individual servings?
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Old 09-29-2021, 05:52 AM   #14
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Individually? Yes, usually. Nicer presentation.
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Old 09-29-2021, 07:26 AM   #15
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Off topic, but related: If your really up for trying something new to you, you won't be disappointed with a high quality carbon steel wok...
Yep, wife has mentioned getting one. But for now we need to slow our roll, as we're running out of storage! Maybe once we've pared down a bit.
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Old 09-29-2021, 03:04 PM   #16
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The Lodge deep skillet your wife requested is commonly refereed to as a "chicken fryer" ~~ It can be used for many recipes/cooking methods. ~~ I suggest before moving into desserts use the 'pot' to fry foods....chicken, fish, french fries etc. Also use it for baking biscuits, cornbread etc. These will give you excellent results as well as continue to season the 'pot' for other uses. Once it is well seasoned, for a dessert try a pineapple upside down cake. Have Fun!
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Old 09-30-2021, 07:04 AM   #17
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The Lodge deep skillet your wife requested is commonly refereed to as a "chicken fryer" ~~ It can be used for many recipes/cooking methods. ~~ I suggest before moving into desserts use the 'pot' to fry foods....chicken, fish, french fries etc. Also use it for baking biscuits, cornbread etc. These will give you excellent results as well as continue to season the 'pot' for other uses. Once it is well seasoned, for a dessert try a pineapple upside down cake. Have Fun!
Too late! Tuesday we made the monkey bread, which came out great, and required only minimal scrubbing to get the caramelized sugar off. Last night was chicken and rice, also very easy to clean. We'll hit a heavier dessert sometime in the near future.
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Old 09-30-2021, 01:09 PM   #18
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My wife requested this deep skillet: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

We're in the process of seasoning it (multiple cycles), and haven't used it yet. I'm thinking it's inauguration could be a nice camp dutch oven style cake dessert (oven or stove), before we move on to stews. One caveat: for some reason my family doesn't seem to like cobblers, a trait definitely not passed down by me.

Would dutch oven recipes work in this? Any recommended recipes?
It says that it is pre-seasoned. why do you have to season again?
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Old 09-30-2021, 05:12 PM   #19
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I say - forget about new pans. Go to garage/estate sales, or Ebay, thrift shops, etc., and look for Griswold cast iron. It's superior to anything you can purchase today. Many people don't know the value, or utility of a Griswold pan, maybe with the exception of this - https://boroughfurnace.com/. Did I mention that this company charges top dollar for their cook wear?

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Old 09-30-2021, 05:59 PM   #20
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I found someone selling old Griswold pans at a flea market a couple of years ago. None of the pieces was priced under $100! Griswold may be great but it’s no longer in the same category as mainline CI where low price is one of the top selling points.
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