"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Desserts, Sweets & Cookies & Candy
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-22-2021, 06:49 AM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: London
Posts: 2
Making ice cream - use raw egg yolks??

Newbie here
I bought an ice cream machine
Most recipes involve using raw egg yolk with absolutely no cooking!!
Is this OK? Does the sugar kill the germs or something??

Doesn't sound right to me.

Just wanted some thoughts.

Thanks.

stoneisland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2021, 07:19 AM   #2
Master Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Waterdown, Ontario
Posts: 5,510
If concerned

If the eggs are already contaminated with salmonella, freezing will not kill the bacteria.

If you have pasteurized eggs available use them.

Or find a recipe that actually uses a type of cooked custard. There are many out there.

Both Serious Eats and Chowline have articles on eggs and ice cream.

And Welcome to DC stoneisland!
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2021, 07:25 AM   #3
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Caracas
Posts: 888
Proper mayonnaise contains raw eggs.Mousse usually uses raw eggs. Ice cream is another. What´s the risk?
Raw eggs can be a source of salmonella, which is a form of food poisoning. According to (UK) government statistics, there are around 100 cases of salmonella each month. That´s less than 0.002% of the population. In the USA, instances are higher, with about 0.4% of the population being affected. However, you are twice as likely to be infected with campylobacter (from chicken, seafood and even vegetables) than salmonella.
It seems that most infections come from "free range" eggs, and authorities recommend using pasterurised eggs if they´re going to be used raw.
Additionally, not ALL eggs are infected; as you can see, it´s a very, very small percentage, but using pasteurised eggs is the way to go.
It is very unfortunate that, when governments publish statistics about food bacteria, there´s a tendency to over-react or exaggerate, and that, unfortunately, is what the general public tends to hear. Remember rice left out to dry, and garlic? Arrghh!! It´s not that serious in a sense. You´re more likely to have a fatal car accident that get food poisoning, or be struck down with a fatal case of the flu!
I´m NOT suggesting you ignore government advice, however - no way. But, by using pasteurised eggs, you should be safe.
karadekoolaid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2021, 09:16 AM   #4
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: London
Posts: 2
Guys
Thanks for the helpful replies
I think I'll try non 'free range' eggs. We normally actually buy free range only.
In UK, never heard of pasteurized eggs.

I'd say 70-80% of recipes I've seen use egg yolks.

I tried one recipe that didn't use egg yolks - it was sooo calorie filled and when frozen was rock solid.
stoneisland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2021, 09:19 AM   #5
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 48,299
Look for another recipe that calls for heating the dairy/egg mixture. There is no shortage of good ice cream recipes.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2021, 09:26 AM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 26,543
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Eggs can also be quite safe without pasteurization, if they come from chickens that were vaccinated against salmonella. If you have a device for cooking sous-vide, then you can pasteurize the eggs yourself.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2021, 09:36 AM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 26,543
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by karadekoolaid View Post
<snip>
According to (UK) government statistics, there are around 100 cases of salmonella each month. That´s less than 0.002% of the population. In the USA, instances are higher, with about 0.4% of the population being affected. <snip>
Additionally, not ALL eggs are infected; as you can see, it´s a very, very small percentage, but using pasteurised eggs is the way to go.
<snip>
While I agree that most eggs are not infected, those stats don't tell us the rate of infection of the eggs. Most of the eggs get cooked and then they don't infect people with salmonella, even if the eggs were infected to start with. Also, to further confuse the stats, raw eggs are not the only way to get salmonella.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2021, 10:06 AM   #8
Master Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Waterdown, Ontario
Posts: 5,510
Vanilla Bean Custard Style Ice Cream

2 cups whole milk (500 ml)
2 cups heavy cream (500 ml) (35%)
1 cup granulated sugar, (250 ml), divided
pinch salt
1 whole vanilla bean, halved and seeds scraped
5 large egg yolks
1.5 tsp pure vanilla extract (7 ml)

Using a mdium saucepan over medium to low heat, whisk milk, cream, half the sugar, salt and the scraped vanilla seeds including the pod. Bring the mixture to just a boil.

While that mixture is heating, combine the yolks rest of the sugar in a medium bowl. Use a mixer or whisk and beat until mixture is pale and thick..

When the milk and cream mix has just come to its slight boil, whisk about 1//3 into the yolk mix. Mix in another 1/3 and once incorporated return all to the saucepan.

Use a wood spoon to stir over low heat until thickened slightly. Do NOT boil or the eggs will overcook. All-in-all should only take a few minutes.

Strain your mixture with fine sieve and remove pod. Bring to room temperature and add in extract. Chill for a couple of hours and proceed to use your ice-cream maker.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2021, 10:12 AM   #9
Master Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Waterdown, Ontario
Posts: 5,510
When I first started looking up how to make ice cream - I gave up after a while as they were all egg/custard types.

And I'm far too lazy to 'temper' the eggs!
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2021, 11:01 AM   #10
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Sir_Loin_of_Beef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Sandy Eggo
Posts: 11,066
Liquid eggs are already pasteurized. 1/4 cup is the equivalent one large egg.
__________________
The older I get, the harder it is to tolerate STUPID!
Sir_Loin_of_Beef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2021, 04:00 PM   #11
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Caracas
Posts: 888
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
While I agree that most eggs are not infected, those stats don't tell us the rate of infection of the eggs. Most of the eggs get cooked and then they don't infect people with salmonella, even if the eggs were infected to start with. Also, to further confuse the stats, raw eggs are not the only way to get salmonella.
Absolutely agree with you, TL. Salmonella is usually transmitted through contamination by faeces, and can be beef, poultry, milk and eggs.
Even though tracing this bacteria(and its effects) has improved tremendously in developed countries - consequently, more cases are exposed - in under-developed countries, the statistics are vague, and perhaps non-existent.
However...a certain hysteria has grown in some countries regarding salmonella, to the extent that "eating uncooked eggs = food poisoning".
(Note to stoneisland: under no circumstances am I implying that you are over-concerned; you´re simply asking a sensible question
All I´m trying to say is that the risk, while it is there, is minimal. In the UK, EU, Australia, NZ, ( and N. America), the likelihood of your contracting salmonella from a raw egg is very remote, because farmers innoculate their animals against it and the government departments involved are meticulous regarding elf and safety.
So go ahead and make your ice-cream, and enjoy it!
karadekoolaid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2021, 12:59 AM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Cooking Goddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Body in MA ~ Heart in OH
Posts: 14,966
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
Liquid eggs are already pasteurized. 1/4 cup is the equivalent one large egg.
But can you buy pasteurized egg YOLKS? Yolks only, no whites included? You use only the yolks to make ice cream. I've seen whites-only boxes of egg product, but never yolks-only.
__________________
"Let things taste of what they are." ~ Alice Waters
Cooking Goddess is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cream, egg, egg yolk, egg yolks, ice cream

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:28 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.