"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Menu Planning > Today's Menu
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-27-2005, 07:57 PM   #1
Sous Chef
 
Corinne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Mystic, CT - transplanted from Lancaster, PA
Posts: 596
Send a message via AIM to Corinne
New Year's Day Food Traditions

jkath's New Year's Eve food thread got me thinking about this. Do any of you serve a traditional meal on New Year's Day & do you know the history behind the tradition?
I will serve what I always do (another PA Dutch thing): Pork & Saurkraut with mashed potatoes. But I don't really know why this is the tradition - it just is.
I was thinking that I might prepare a few different regional traditional foods & ask the shelter if I can cook & serve again on New Year's Day if they don't already have someone lined up.

__________________
I'm all about the food!
Corinne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2005, 07:58 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pdswife's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Mazatlan
Posts: 20,334
Send a message via AIM to pdswife Send a message via MSN to pdswife Send a message via Yahoo to pdswife
Not really. We just make what ever sounds good at the time.
__________________
Love the life you live!
pdswife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2005, 08:06 PM   #3
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA,Florida
Posts: 3,835
We always have blackeyed peas, rice, coleslaw, and cornbread for our New Years' day but this year are invited to an all day shindig which doesn't include those foods. I suppose we will postpone our usual meal til a day or so later since we go to the farm for a week. We are having a barn raising while there and it would be good to have that. I think the tradition behind our meal is superstition from ages past. The peas (lots of things to eat are for health, coleslaw (green stuff, many people eat greens of some sort or other) for wealth. We've been quite healthy and while not wealthy, we aren't usually broke, so I suppose the green stuff works to some effect.
__________________
Be an organ donor; give your heart to Jesus.
Exercise daily; walk with the Lord.
licia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2005, 08:07 PM   #4
Executive Chef
 
AllenOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA, Oklahoma
Posts: 3,463
My family always made Black-eyed Peas, fried potatoes, and cornbread. I know the Black-eyed Peas (or a dish called Hoppin' John) are traditional, as many folks believe they bring good luck when you eat them on New Year's.

PeppA and her family always do a seafood boil they call "Beer Shrimp", in which they cook shrimp, crab, and sometimes a lobster tail or two in a beer/vinegar broth.
__________________
Peace, Love, and Vegetable Rights!
Eat Meat and Save the Plants!
AllenOK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2005, 08:10 PM   #5
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA,Florida
Posts: 3,835
Does the seafood have a "significance" or just good food?
__________________
Be an organ donor; give your heart to Jesus.
Exercise daily; walk with the Lord.
licia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2005, 11:09 PM   #6
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 4,764
Send a message via MSN to urmaniac13 Send a message via Skype™ to urmaniac13
In Italy the traditional New Years Eve dinner is a cotecchino (a kind of big pork sausage, the authentic one is stuffed in a pig's toe, but we opt for just regular sausage shape...) cooked with lentils. They are supposed to bring good luck, so it is kind of a mystery why there are so many disgruntled grouchy people around... Well they are nice, and then we move onto champagne with either ricciarelli or panforte, both are almond based sweet treat from Siena, Italy.
urmaniac13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2005, 01:55 AM   #7
Executive Chef
 
Piccolina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 4,319
Send a message via AIM to Piccolina Send a message via MSN to Piccolina Send a message via Yahoo to Piccolina
Growing up, if were at home, we always had a bounty of wonderful homemade appies. It was one of only two days a year that sausage rolls would make an apperance in our house (the other being Christmas Eve, and I tell you, when I first moved out on my own, it felt so cool to be able to buy them at other times of the year, a little weird, but certianly cool). Other favourites like devilled eggs, a cheese board, cold cuts, pickles, spinach dip, things made with filo and the like were common, depending on the budget at the time.

However, if we were going to my grandparents (and this was more when I was quite young) we had a very traditional Russian/Ukrainian sort of meal. With borscht, blinis, perogies, creamy dill sauces, tarts (I remember one with peas, it was fabulous - I should see if I can talk the recipe out of my gran!), smoked fish and meats - it was awesome!

In the days since childhood though I've mostly stuck to a middle ground between an assortment of appetizers or like Pdswife, whatever we are in the mood for that day
__________________
Jessica

"The most indispensable ingredient of all good home cooking: love, for those you are cooking for" ~ Sophia Loren
Piccolina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2005, 05:07 AM   #8
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA,Florida
Posts: 3,835
I suppose our traditions were much like many others. One thing I remember as a child was candy in our stocking - always kinds that we didn't get often. After Christmas was over, usually around New Years or maybe even after, we would be sitting around the fireplace and mom would bring out a basket with candies in it. Dad would crack all different kinds of nuts and pass them out to us and mom would give us the candy to go with the nuts. I don't know why we never got to expect this, but it was always a surprise. I don't remember ever connecting it to the same kind that was in our stockings until much later in life - really after I left home. My mom is 88 years old and when I mention how much something like that meant to me, she tears us and just smiles. I wonder if it meant as much to my siblings as it did to me. I must ask them.
__________________
Be an organ donor; give your heart to Jesus.
Exercise daily; walk with the Lord.
licia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2005, 08:38 AM   #9
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Scotland
Posts: 2,977
The Scots use New Year's Eve as their biggest celebration of the year, not New Year's Day. Hogmanay has many traditions, like being First-Footed by a tall, dark handsome man - with a lump of coal in one pocket (and, in the case of most Scotsmen I know, a bottle of whisky in the other!). He should be the 'first foot' over your doorstep after 'the bells' at midnight on Hogmanay. Red haired people are not considered lucky - so you will see gangs of us, corralled into a room to save the disaster of us being the first 'visitor' for the year.

We spend the time between Christmas and new year ensuring the house is spotless - you should start the year with everything cleaned to within an inch of its life! Also cooking. I made the black bun back at the beginning of December, ditto sausage rolls and bridies. The steak pies are made on hogmanay, ditto the shortbread. I will also cook a ham and a joint of finest aberdeen angus beef.

It is also a time of reconciliation. Most quarrels are 'mended' in time for Hogmanay. Another way of starting off the new year with a clean slate.

Visitors start calling into homes by about 6 pm - and it goes on for two or three days!

Edinburgh hosts what they claim is the biggest street party in the world on Hogmanay. Here's the website http://www.edinburghshogmanay.org/events/programme.html
Ishbel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2005, 08:50 AM   #10
Master Chef
 
texasgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: North Texas
Posts: 9,497
Backeyed peas with ham hocks, collard greens and cornbread.
texasgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2005, 09:51 AM   #11
Executive Chef
 
AllenOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA, Oklahoma
Posts: 3,463
Quote:
Originally Posted by licia
Does the seafood have a "significance" or just good food?
I'm not sure. Now, if I could just teach them that you only need to poach the shrimp for a few minutes, instead of cooking it for 30......
__________________
Peace, Love, and Vegetable Rights!
Eat Meat and Save the Plants!
AllenOK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2005, 10:06 AM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 21,539
water, tums, aspirin, something really greasy, more aspirin, more tums, regular coke at room temp, toast, chinese food.
__________________
The past is gone it's all been said.
So here's to what the future brings,
I know tomorrow you'll find better things
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2005, 01:36 PM   #13
Chef Extraordinaire
 
mudbug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NoVA, beyond the Beltway
Posts: 11,166
Quote:
Originally Posted by texasgirl
Backeyed peas with ham hocks, collard greens and cornbread.
Subtract the collards and add mimosas, and you're eatin' in my kitchen on New Year's Day.

We also make a big pot of Rotel dip with sausage and put out various chips.

Oh, and don't forget to bring your leftover Christmas treats. We all eat each other's to get rid of them for the new year.
__________________
Kool Aid - Think before you drink.
mudbug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2005, 01:49 PM   #14
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA,Florida
Posts: 3,835
Taking the treats is a wonderful idea - I'd never thought about that. We didn't even touch our desserts hardly. I have 2 pies with only 1 piece missing and one that wasn't cut at all - more than half of a fruitcake and about half of a mandarin orange cake (the rest I sent home with sil. I don't know why we weren't hungry for dessert this year. I tried to have a delicious, but healthy dinner so perhaps that was the reason everyone passed on most of the dessert.
__________________
Be an organ donor; give your heart to Jesus.
Exercise daily; walk with the Lord.
licia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2005, 01:50 PM   #15
Master Chef
 
texasgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: North Texas
Posts: 9,497
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
water, tums, aspirin, something really greasy, more aspirin, more tums, regular coke at room temp, toast, chinese food.


This is more like what happens, but, you asked for traditions.


Mudbug, I'm the only one in the house that will eat the collard greens, noone else cares for them.
texasgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2005, 02:44 PM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kadesma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: california
Posts: 21,371
New Years Eve the whole bunch of us go to our favorite Chinese place and have dinner, we then come back here and have dessert later in the evening..It's pretty quiet, except for the kiddos. We just talk and play games with the kids...Nothing special..Just us
kadesma
__________________
HEAVEN is Cade, Ethan,Carson, and Olivia,Alyssa,Gianna
kadesma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2005, 02:48 PM   #17
Hospitality Queen
 
jkath's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Southern California
Posts: 11,448
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
water, tums, aspirin, something really greasy, more aspirin, more tums, regular coke at room temp, toast, chinese food.
Buckytom+silly comments = my coffee all over my monitor.


We always have finger foods for New Year's Eve's game night, and then on New Year's Day, it's whatever I can forrage through the fridge for.
__________________
Come visit my foodie blog: www.SockmonkeysKitchen.com
This week's topic: Pinterest and Potatoes
jkath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2006, 10:54 PM   #18
Sous Chef
 
Corinne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Mystic, CT - transplanted from Lancaster, PA
Posts: 596
Send a message via AIM to Corinne
Reviving this thread - we're having a few couples over for New Year's Day. So far the menu is Pork & Saurkraut in one crockpot, kielbasa, brats, etc. with saurkraut in another crock pot. Mashed taters on the side. To me, the menu is really lacking.

Can anyone share other traditional New Year's Day meals from different parts of the country? I have heard of Hoppin' John a number of times - I think it's a southern thing. I need to research that one & find a good recipe.

Thank you!
__________________
I'm all about the food!
Corinne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2006, 07:27 AM   #19
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Monroe, Michigan
Posts: 5,912
Send a message via Yahoo to Barb L.
Wink

New Years day is Football - so, lots of munchies - cheese, sausage, meatballs, veggie try, cheeseballs, dips, chips and crackers. May do a Boston Butt, for sandwiches !
Barb L. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2006, 08:46 AM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,515
Fairly tradtional across the South...Black-eyed peas and hog jowl (meat that comes from the cheek of the hog..cured kinda like bacon...can be bought in a chunk or sliced) or smoked hocks, and of course cornbread...Tradition says it brings good luck.

Please use the dry variety.(not the canned version) soak over night in plenty of water then cook until tender with your favorite seasonings...salt, pepper garlic, onions, peppers, thyme, cumin, and so on.....
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:13 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.