"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Menu Planning > Today's Menu
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-11-2006, 02:07 PM   #41
Head Chef
 
BigDog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Farmington, Minnesota
Posts: 1,007
Send a message via MSN to BigDog Send a message via Yahoo to BigDog
Minnesota Wild Rice Soup

2 sticks (1/2 lb.) butter
1 white onion,diced small
2 stalks celery , diced small
3 small carrots , diced small
2 Tbsp. sherry
2 cups flour
2 qts. chicken stock
12 oz wild rice
2 cups heavy whipping cream
Salt & pepper to taste

In a heavy cooking pot, melt butter. Add onions, celery, and carrots and saute until onions are translucent. Add sherry and stir. Add flour and stir until flour is dissolved and beginnign to cook. Add 1 qtof the chicken stock. Stir until thick. Slowly add the remaining 1 qt stock. Stir. Add the wild rice and simmer for 45 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Slowly add the whipping cream, stir and cook until heated through. Serve. Makes 11 servings

Source: http://www.cookingcache.com/soupsand...ricesoup.shtml
__________________
Integrity & Honesty
have been sacrificed on the combined altars of Control, Political Correctness, and Convenience
BigDog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2006, 02:08 PM   #42
Executive Chef
 
Half Baked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,927
I think scrapple for Pennsylvania.

But I love scrapple if it is made with Julia Child's recipe.
__________________
Jan
Please spay and neuter your pets. The Animal Rescue Site
Half Baked is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2006, 02:14 PM   #43
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 4,655
I don't know if Delaware would claim it or not, but wild game is truely a speciality of the state's cuisine: snapper soup, wild duck or goose braised with arromatic vegetables served with biscuits, even fricasee of marsh-rabbit!
Robo410 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2006, 02:15 PM   #44
Senior Cook
 
Seven S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: N of the Equator, W of the Greenwich Meridian
Posts: 372
How about Texas Chili?

Memphis-Style BBQ and Kansas-City Style BBQ s of the South!!
Seven S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2006, 02:16 PM   #45
Senior Cook
 
Seven S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: N of the Equator, W of the Greenwich Meridian
Posts: 372
can anyone mention foods from the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. ?? (wild salmon on cedar plank)
Seven S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2006, 02:17 PM   #46
Executive Chef
 
amber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Maine
Posts: 4,099
Seafood is one of the most popular foods here in Maine, as well as the rest of New England. The most popular ones are lobster, clams, mussels, shrimp, cod, haddock. Fiddleheads are popular in early spring, and blueberries and apples are popular fruits for pies or eaten fresh. There are many people that like to hunt wild game and I would say deer and bears are two of the most popular ones.
amber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2006, 02:31 PM   #47
Head Chef
 
phinz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: The Surface of the Sun
Posts: 1,901
I thought Minnesota would be Lutefisk and Aquavit, though not necessarily in that order.
__________________
It's good for the soul when there's not a soul in sight.

Trader Scott's Tiki Bar & Lounge
phinz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2006, 03:28 PM   #48
Everymom
 
Alix's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 23,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by phinz
I thought Minnesota would be Lutefisk and Aquavit, though not necessarily in that order.
Heh heh heh. Nice one phinz. I think MN would be the "hot dish" wouldn't it?
__________________
You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it. Robin Williams
Alix
Alix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2006, 03:38 PM   #49
Chef Extraordinaire
 
mudbug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NoVA, beyond the Beltway
Posts: 11,166
Smithfield ham from Virginia. Make a mess of biscuits and pig out.
__________________
Kool Aid - Think before you drink.
mudbug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2006, 11:24 PM   #50
Senior Cook
 
Seven S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: N of the Equator, W of the Greenwich Meridian
Posts: 372
i mentioned "Shrimp & Grits" for Charleston, South Carolina and later found this quote:

In the Low Country of South Carolina and particularly Charleston, shrimp and grits has been considered a basic breakfast for coastal fishermen and families for decades during the shrimp season (May through December). Simply called 'breakfast shrimp," the dish consisted of a pot of grits with shrimp cooked in a little bacon grease or butter. During the past decade, this dish has been dressed up and taken out on the town to the fanciest restaurants. Not just for breakfast anymore, it is also served for brunch, lunch, and dinner.
In 1976, South Carolina declared grits the official state food:
Whereas, throughout its history, the South has relished its grits, making them a symbol of its diet, its customs, its humor, and its hospitality, and whereas, every community in the State of south Carolina used to be the site of a grist mill and every local economy in the State used to be dependent on its product; and whereas, grits has been a part of the life of every South Carolinian of whatever race, background, gender, and income; and whereas, grits could very well play a vital role in the future of not only this State, but also the world, if as The Charleston News and Courier proclaimed in 1952: 'An inexpensive, simple, and thoroughly digestible food, [grits] should be made popular throughout the world. given enough of it, the inhabitants of planet Earth would have nothing to fight about. A man full of [grits] is a man of peace.'


http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/GritsHistory.htm


Seven S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2006, 11:34 PM   #51
Sous Chef
 
Lynan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 502
Send a message via MSN to Lynan
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loprraine
Maryland = Crabcakes.
Then my next stop in the USA is gonna be Maryland.

Sigh.......
__________________
In the book of life, the answers are NOT in the back.
Lynan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2006, 12:57 AM   #52
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA,Florida
Posts: 3,835
I haven't read all of this thread, so don't know if anyone posted this or not, but here it is:http://www.vernalisapartymenus.com/state.html. It has recipes from each of the 50.
__________________
Be an organ donor; give your heart to Jesus.
Exercise daily; walk with the Lord.
licia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2006, 01:36 AM   #53
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,763
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
Blueberries are the State Fruit of New Jersey (where I live). Here's a tasty way to serve them...

BLUEBERRY RIPPLE (LEMON BUTTERMILK) ICE CREAM

This ice cream is very low in butterfat, so it’s best served the same day you make it. Later, it tends to become “rocky.” The tangy flavor of the lemon and buttermilk complement the blueberries very well.

6 servings

for the Blueberry Ripple:

1/2 cup blueberries
1/4 cup Crème de Cassis liqueur
1/4 cup cold water
2 tablespoons cane sugar
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 cup whole blueberries

Combine all ingredients except the second 1/2 cup of blueberries in a small, non-reactive saucepan. Simmer the mixture over low heat until it forms a thick syrup, and the berries fall apart. Remove from heat and add the remaining berries. Allow the mixture to cool thoroughly.

for the Lemon Buttermilk Ice Cream:

6 large egg yolks
1/3 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
3/4 cup superfine sugar
2 cups buttermilk
the zest of 1 large lemon

1. In the top of a double boiler, whisk together egg yolks, sugar and lemon juice. Set the pan over gently shimmering water and cook, whisking constantly, until a candy thermometer registers 175 degrees F. This may take about 10 minutes. In any case, don’t let the mixture boil.

2. Strain the mixture through a sieve into a fairly flat bowl and allow to cool while the surface is covered with a piece of waxed paper.

3. Combine the buttermilk and lemon zest with the cooled lemon mixture thoroughly, and freeze in an ice cream maker, following the manufacturer’s directions. When the ice cream has achieved a soft-frozen consistency, remove from the freezer and place in a very cold stainless steel bowl. Swirl in the blueberry syrup, then carefully transfer the ice cream to a freezer container, and allow to “season” in the freezer for several hours.
__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2006, 08:44 AM   #54
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Straits of Juan de Fuca
Posts: 893
June, that looks delicious!!

Washington state can do more than just apples!!! (Altho, darn good apples)

Huckleberry Pie
Dungeness (can't beat Dungeness anywhere!!) Crab cakes
Salmon
Nanaimo Bars
and Pears - we grow a lot of pears!!
cjs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2006, 08:54 AM   #55
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,763
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
Quote:
Nanaimo Bars
I thought those were from Nanaimo, BC..... No?
__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2006, 09:00 AM   #56
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Straits of Juan de Fuca
Posts: 893
(close enuf...) ;)

scratch Nanaimo bars....
cjs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2006, 09:37 AM   #57
Executive Chef
 
Dina's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Mission, Texas
Posts: 2,686
Send a message via Yahoo to Dina
Texas is known for chili and BBQ. We have a Taste of Texas every April and feast on barbeque, chili and smoked steaks.
__________________
Dina
If you have much, give of your wealth. If you have little, give of your heart. - Arab proverb
Dina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2006, 09:44 AM   #58
Master Chef
 
Constance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Illiniois
Posts: 8,175
Illinois needs to be divided in two...Northern and Southern. Actually, there have been attempts to make Southern Illinois a separate state since the Civil War, and they are still going on today.
Chicago's deep-dish pizza would be their claim to fame, I think.
Down here in the south, the unique Burton's Cafe White Pie, or our rolled-style dumplings are our signature dishes.
And I can't forget fried bluegill...bluegill is our state fish.
__________________
We get by with a little help from our friends
Constance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2006, 10:06 AM   #59
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 1,285
Northern MN, is well known for it's Wild Rice HOTDISH or Wild Rice Soup. Ya Ya, Lutefisk is served around holidays but only by the older folks. Can't stand it myself. The churches serve it usually around deer season.
thumpershere2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2006, 10:21 AM   #60
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 4,655
everyone needs to bring a "dish to pass"
Robo410 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.