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Old 09-14-2006, 12:11 AM   #81
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Let's not forget California's San Francisco sourdough bread (they claim it's French, but my sources say it was originally Basque). And "chicken-fried steak" in Texas (probably a variation of German wienerschnitzel).

Having lived in both places, I should point out that "Mexican" dishes in the two states can be very different, even if they have identical names.
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Old 09-14-2006, 12:30 AM   #82
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Our family salsa
(The olive oil is not traditional, but we like it.)

3 cups fresh chopped tomato, skins and seeds removed
1/4 cup white wine balsamic vinegar
4 hot peppers (we used 2 red filgier hot longs, 2 yellow caribes)
2 large cloves garlic
.75 oz. fresh cilantro leaves, washed, no stems (.75 oz when trimmed)
3 small Texas sweet onions (with green tops), chopped (5 oz when chopped)
1 tablespoon salt

Olive oil to taste
============================
Put everything except the olive oil in the food processor.
Pulse until desired texture is reached.
Pour into a non-metallic container with a tight cover. Refrigerate overnight.
To serve, spoon into a small dish and mix with a little olive oil.
Good anywhere you want a spicy sauce.
If you don't have a food processor, just chop everything fine and use it as "pico de gallo."
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Old 09-14-2006, 02:05 AM   #83
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"cranberries and chorizo are the two top contenders coming from mass."

Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
Ahh, but these are not recipes.
ok. i'm from rhode island, not mass. but i'll go the extra yard here.

cranberry sauce. i'd say that possibly 99.99% o f people in the u.s. eat cranberry sauce at least once a year. recipe: water, cranberries, sugar. boil for about 10 minutes. done. only a scrambled egg is any easier.

i'll go out on a limb here and suggest that chorizo is at it's best fried up as is and eaten separately or in a sandwich.
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Old 09-14-2006, 06:09 AM   #84
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Quote:
Originally Posted by college_cook
Hard to say what Indiana's would be....
Wasn't Alton Brown in Indiana when he ate that fried brain sandwichich on Tasting Ashphalt?

John
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Old 09-14-2006, 08:42 AM   #85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ronjohn55
Wasn't Alton Brown in Indiana when he ate that fried brain sandwichich on Tasting Ashphalt?

John
Yes, I believe he was.
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Old 09-14-2006, 09:19 AM   #86
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hmmm....... sounds kinda delicious if you like organs.
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Old 09-30-2006, 06:52 PM   #87
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Frogmore Stew

Quote:
Originally Posted by FraidKnot
Okay, it's not really a stew. It's more like a big boil of stuff. But it's called Frogmore Stew. My parents live in what used to be called 'Frogmore', South Carolina. It's now called (again) St. Helena, just south of Beaufort.
FraidKnot just made me think of another traditional dish from South Carolina to add to this great thread - Frogmore Stew!!
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Old 09-30-2006, 07:10 PM   #88
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Originally Posted by Seven S
FraidKnot just made me think of something traditional from South Carolina to add to this great thread!
Annnnnd what would that be ??
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Old 09-30-2006, 08:29 PM   #89
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Frogmore Stew

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Originally Posted by Barb L
Annnnnd what would that be ??
Stew made with more and more frogs!!!

OK, sorry about that... here it is
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Old 10-02-2006, 12:34 AM   #90
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Hoppin' John

And yet another dish from South Carolina...

"Hoppin' John is found in most states of the South, but it is mainly associated with the Carolinas. Gullah or Low Country cuisine reflects the cooking of the Carolinas, especially the Sea islands (a cluster of islands stretching along the coats of south Carolina and northern Georgia). Black-eyed peas, also called cow peas, are thought to have been introduced to America by African slaves who worked the rice plantations. Hoppin' John is a rich bean dish made of black-eyed peas simmered with spicy sausages, ham hocks, or fat pork, rice, and tomato sauce."

http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/HoppinJohn.htm
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Old 10-02-2006, 05:41 AM   #91
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I'm only pulling a rabbit out of a hat as I'm sure many might and COULD disagree with me. But NC could be either Pecan pie or Chocolate Chess Pie.

Ciao,
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Old 10-02-2006, 08:19 AM   #92
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In Alabama it has to be Fried Chicken with Biscuits & gravy; 'Mater sandwiches w/ lots of mayo;Peach Cobbler and homemade Peach Ice Cream. I guess I have to include Fried Catfish w/ Hushpuppies but as far as I'm concerned you can leave out the Catfish.
Ishbel, thanks for reminding me about the apple pie w/ a chunk of cheese. I grew up eating it that way and had forgotten how good it was.
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Old 10-05-2006, 10:11 PM   #93
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve A
I'm only pulling a rabbit out of a hat as I'm sure many might and COULD disagree with me. But NC could be either Pecan pie or Chocolate Chess Pie.

Ciao,
ive seen both Texas and Florida claim the Pecan Pie
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Old 10-06-2006, 05:32 PM   #94
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P. S.
My husband has chastised me for forgetting Fried Green Tomatoes for Alabama. We live 10-15 miles from the Whistlestop, so it is unforgivable to leave them out. (If you're ever in town, don't bother. Theirs are not that good.)
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Old 10-06-2006, 05:49 PM   #95
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www.foodtimeline.org has a section of official state foods not every state
has a pie. The only one I know is the New York State muffin is apple.
So I guess both of you are right. Each state does have an official food but not every state has an official pie.
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Old 10-07-2006, 10:00 AM   #96
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Kansas is famous for Bierocks.

BIEROCKS

2 lbs. hamburger
1 c. onion, chopped
4 c. cabbage, chopped
2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. pepper
Cook hamburger, onion, cabbage, salt and pepper until browned. Roll out dough and cut into large circles. Put 1/4 cup meat mixture in center of dough. Pinch closed. Bake until browned, approximately 20 minutes, at 375 degrees.
DOUGH FOR BIEROCKS:
2 pkgs. yeast
1 tsp. salt
1 c. warm milk
4 c. flour
1 1/4 c. sugar
1/2 c. warm water
1/4 c. butter, softened
Dissolve yeast in warm water. Set in warm place. Add warm milk, butter and salt; let stand for 10 minutes with yeast mixture in it. Add flour and sugar. Let double for 50 minutes.
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Old 10-07-2006, 11:03 AM   #97
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marigene
Kansas is famous for Bierocks.

BIEROCKS

2 lbs. hamburger
1 c. onion, chopped
4 c. cabbage, chopped
2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. pepper
Cook hamburger, onion, cabbage, salt and pepper until browned. Roll out dough and cut into large circles. Put 1/4 cup meat mixture in center of dough. Pinch closed. Bake until browned, approximately 20 minutes, at 375 degrees.
DOUGH FOR BIEROCKS:
2 pkgs. yeast
1 tsp. salt
1 c. warm milk
4 c. flour
1 1/4 c. sugar
1/2 c. warm water
1/4 c. butter, softened
Dissolve yeast in warm water. Set in warm place. Add warm milk, butter and salt; let stand for 10 minutes with yeast mixture in it. Add flour and sugar. Let double for 50 minutes.
Sounds like something my family would like - what size are your large circles (in inches?) and do you fold the dough over and press together to seal? Thanks !
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Old 10-07-2006, 11:53 AM   #98
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Cut into 5-inch squares. Place 2 tablespoons of meat mixture on each square. Fold dough pocket and pinch together to seal well. I let them rise on a cookie sheet.
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Old 10-07-2006, 03:06 PM   #99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marigene
Cut into 5-inch squares. Place 2 tablespoons of meat mixture on each square. Fold dough pocket and pinch together to seal well. I let them rise on a cookie sheet.
Thank you so much - I do want to try these !!
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Old 10-09-2006, 02:11 PM   #100
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If we're sticking to pies, I'll log in with tourtiere for New Hampshire.
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