"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Menu Planning > Today's Menu
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-29-2006, 12:54 AM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Beijing
Posts: 167
Strange Culinary Names. Can You Think Of Any?

Seeing the posting by Cara for Mecklenburger Coloured Cat triggered off a thought. As has been pointed out, cat is not called for in the recipe any more than you will find dog in a Hot Dog.

But there are many strange culinary names. For example, you will not find any Rabbit in Welsh Rabbit or any Woodcock in Scotch Woodcock. Neither are there any toads in Toad in the Hole. And no meat is to be found in Mincemeat, and there is certainly no duck in a Bombay Duck, nor in Cold Duck.

And you will not find many parts of a buffalo in Buffalo Wings, or much lemon in Lemon Sole. Nor will you find much of Richard in Spotted Dick!

Can you think of other strange names for edible dishes?

advoca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2006, 02:20 AM   #2
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Humm ... I have several recipes for Mincemeat that actually do call for minced meat. And Buffalo Wings refers to the supposed place of their origin (Buffalo, NY) - not an ingredient any more than Kansas City or Memphis BBQ contains any portion of Kansas City or Memphis in the recipe.

But, I will admit - some foods get strange names and even stranger connotations.
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2006, 02:28 AM   #3
Hospitality Queen
 
jkath's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Southern California
Posts: 11,448
Actually, Welsh Rarebit is the correct spelling, from what I can remember. (Taken from the literal terms - rare, and just a bit)

Although I've caught myself chuckling at the recipes for "Hoppin' John"....
__________________
Come visit my foodie blog: www.SockmonkeysKitchen.com
This week's topic: Pinterest and Potatoes
jkath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2006, 02:47 AM   #4
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
jkath - the way I heard it ... it really is Welsh Rabbit - the Rarebit is just to gussy it up and explain the lack of rabbit in the dish. According to a book I once read - the truth behind the name of the dish is this:

A Welshman went out hunting one day, promising his wife that he was going to bring home a big fat rabbit ... and several hours later around sunset she saw him walking home empty handed. So, she whipped up this dish and plopped it down in front of him and said, "Here's your Rabbit."
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2006, 03:48 AM   #5
Master Chef
 
expatgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Texas girl living in Kazakhstan
Posts: 5,568
For those of you who know what "Rocky Mountain Oysters" are, THAT misnomer takes the cake for me---never tried them but have heard "not bad" and I'll just take their word for it. Anyone know how that name came about???? Really would be curious.
expatgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2006, 09:43 AM   #6
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 47,090
How about Johnny cake - very popular in hospitals. (I know, it was originally called journey cake).

Bubble and Squeak always intrigued me.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2006, 09:58 AM   #7
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 294
a peanut is neither a pea or a nut, it's a legume
Chef_Jimmy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2006, 10:17 AM   #8
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 4,764
Send a message via MSN to urmaniac13 Send a message via Skype™ to urmaniac13


"Spotted Dick".... I wouldn't go into any details why I think this is a funny name, however this is a sort of pudding popular in the UK, spotted because it is dotted with currants, and Dick refers to "dough"...
urmaniac13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2006, 10:19 AM   #9
Contest Winner
 
grumblebee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: canada
Posts: 720
Yorkshire pudding is an odd one... it's not pudding at all!

Fiddleheads is a funny name as well.
__________________
~passionate pescetarian~
grumblebee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2006, 10:42 AM   #10
Head Chef
 
auntdot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,418
Chicken oysters?
auntdot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2006, 11:03 AM   #11
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
The one that always got me was chicken friend steak.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2006, 11:33 AM   #12
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Lala Land
Posts: 13
Ever spotted blood in your 'bloody Mary'?...
__________________
"Don't ever take a fence down until you know the reason why it was put up."
Sugarcane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2006, 11:34 AM   #13
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
No to mention any Mary in your Bloody Mary
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2006, 11:59 AM   #14
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 21,539
i like the upbeat terms used with citrus, like zest, or supremes.

what about sweetbreads? it's neither sweet, nor a bread. they're 2 types made from organs, thymus and pancreas.
__________________
The past is gone it's all been said.
So here's to what the future brings,
I know tomorrow you'll find better things
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2006, 02:19 PM   #15
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Midwest
Posts: 874
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkath
Actually, Welsh Rarebit is the correct spelling, from what I can remember. (Taken from the literal terms - rare, and just a bit)
I once read somewhere that it was originally a medieval English slur against the Welsh. Because it has no actual meat in it, the dish was called "Welsh Rabbit" to mock the Welsh. Supposedly they were too uncivilized and poor to cook meat in their dishes. In later days, they changed it to "Rarebit" instead to try to no longer offend the Welsh.
velochic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2006, 08:00 PM   #16
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Beijing
Posts: 167
Ooh! The picture is not Spotted Dick. This delicious pudding (Spotted Dick) is white with dark spots like a Dalmation.

And yes, the correct name is Welsh Rabbit, not Rarebit. It is a kind of joke. (And speaking as a Welshman, we have never considered this a slur or a jibe.)

Incidentally, a friend has told me about English Monkey. Anyone know about this American dish? No monkies in this, obviously.
advoca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2006, 04:01 PM   #17
Chef Extraordinaire
 
mudbug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NoVA, beyond the Beltway
Posts: 11,166
Never heard of an American dish called English Monkey. Monkey bread, though.
__________________
Kool Aid - Think before you drink.
mudbug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2006, 04:09 PM   #18
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 47,090
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudbug
Never heard of an American dish called English Monkey. Monkey bread, though.

Monkey bread doesn't count, it actually has monkey in it.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2006, 04:14 PM   #19
Chef Extraordinaire
 
mudbug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NoVA, beyond the Beltway
Posts: 11,166
__________________
Kool Aid - Think before you drink.
mudbug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2006, 05:13 PM   #20
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Beijing
Posts: 167
Here is the recipe for English Monkey
1 cup stale bread crumbs
1/2 cup soft mild cheese, cut in small pieces
1 cup milk

1 tablespoon butter
1 egg

1/2 teaspoon salt
Few grains cayenne

Soak bread crumbs fifteen minutes in milk. Melt butter, add cheese, and when cheese has melted, add the soaked crumbs, the egg slightly beaten, and seasonings. Cook for three minutes, and pour over toasted crackers which have been spread sparingly with butter.

Incidenally, a speciality at Chinese banquets is called Monkey Brains, It is actually a fungus, thank goodness! No brains and no monkey.
advoca is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:07 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.