"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Health, Nutrition and Special Diets
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-27-2005, 09:07 AM   #1
Executive Chef
 
Raine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: NC
Posts: 3,549
Exclamation Cleaning your grill precautions

Folks, please be careful and be safe!

http://www.canada.com/national/natio...e-cb3457ce535d

__________________

Raine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2005, 09:12 AM   #2
Senior Cook
 
msalper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Izmir / Turkey
Posts: 253
Send a message via MSN to msalper
Uhhh... It can be painful...
Thanks, Raine!!!.
__________________

__________________
"Don't let the chain of love end with you......Alper"
msalper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2005, 09:24 AM   #3
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 9,475
Okay I couldn’t bring my self to read pass first two paragraphs, but can I bring in an off-topic, it is about cleaning grills.

The other day I was at my friends’ house, he recently bought a beautiful gas grill, and so we were invited for BBQ. So he tells me that sales person told him never to scrub the grill with those brushes, and maybe just spray a bit of oil when starting to grill, but not to clean the old grease at all, it’s better for the flavor, he said. Huh? Am I missing something? Should we then stop doing dishes all together?
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2005, 09:28 AM   #4
Executive Chef
 
Raine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: NC
Posts: 3,549
Exactly what I say Charlie, when folks say they never clean their grill because that is where the flavor is.

Need flavor, we'll sell you a 5 gallon bucket of it
Raine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2005, 09:42 AM   #5
Master Chef
 
PA Baker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA, Pennsylvania
Posts: 6,000
I stopped using those metal brushes for just that reason. Luckily I saw the bristles stuck to the grill and no one ingested them.

I DO clean my grill. I can't stand the smell when someone turns on a grill that has never been cleaned! I've found the easiest way is to bring the grate inside and cover it with wet paper towels. I let them sit on the grate for about 15 minutes to soften up all the gunk and it's then easy to clean with a Scotch-brite type sponge. Seems to work for us!
__________________
-A balanced diet is a cookie in each hand
PA Baker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2005, 10:05 AM   #6
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 1
Clean the Grill

Here's an idea on cleaning the grids on BBQ grills...

Once your food is cooked, removed, and carried to where it will be eaten (and the gas is turned off if it's a gas grill) take a few extra seconds to remove the grids to a large tin bucket and spray them with oven cleaner. Let them sit while you enjoy your meal. When you're done with your meal, come back out and spray them clean with the garden hose. At this time they should be cool enough that any stuck on food can be safely scrubbed off with a standard stiff bristled household scrub brush. Once clean, pick them up, spray rinse them with the hose and put them back on the grill to dry. If you want, you can give them a quick drying off with paper towels and a light spritzing with cooking spray before reinstalling.
megg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2005, 09:38 PM   #7
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 46,517
If you crank up the grill and incinerate the residue on the grates, then you can brush off the ashes and hard dry burned residue easily with no risk of leaving bristles behind in the gunk. The gunk has all burned off.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2005, 12:47 AM   #8
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
I'm following Andy's line of thinking - the problem is probably technique.

I can see where this "might" happen if someone only gets the grill warm (the baked on grease just gets semi-soft and can act like a glue to hold broken bristles from an old brush that probably should have been retired several years ago) then the meat is slapped on before the residue can burn off.

If I read the story correctly - the brush was several years old. I buy a new one every year or two ... depends on how much I use it. And, I don't leave it hanging out all year to deteriorate ...

I know you're on the circuit Raine - how do you clean your grills???
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2005, 08:00 AM   #9
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 1,285
We clean ours the same way, high heat. And thats a Weber. the hot coals burn everything off.
thumpershere2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2005, 08:49 AM   #10
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
I am with Andy and Michael on this as well. After I am done cooking I crank up the heat to high (if it is not already there) and let it go for about 5 minutes or more. Everything burns to a crisp. I then take my brush to it and everything just comes right off.

I buy a new brush once or twice a season. I buy a cheapo brush. I don't usually spend more than $2 on them. They may not be cool looking and stainless steel or anything like that, but they get the job done and I don't have to feel bad about trashing then when needed.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2005, 08:55 AM   #11
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: USA,Colorado
Posts: 358
Well, I used to use an industrial vapor-steam cleaner to clean my BBQ, but so many people went on at me for being too fussy....so now I use the 'burn it to an ash & brush it off' method. After reading this article though, I may just go back to my old method!

Paint.
__________________
British ex-pat living in Colorado, USA
Paint is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2005, 09:03 AM   #12
Executive Chef
 
Raine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: NC
Posts: 3,549
We use a weed burner to heat up the grate and loosen the gunk. Then use a steel grill brush to scrap the gunk, then wipe it off with paper towels to get any particles. Every other cleaning, it get sprayed with oven cleaner and hosed off, then the grates are oiled down to prevent rust.


Some people just don't pay attention. Just like some people should never operate a gas grill or turkey fryer.
Raine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2005, 09:10 AM   #13
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA,Florida
Posts: 3,835
We burn then brush ours also, BUT, if it ever does get gunky, I spray oven cleaner on the grates and put them in a large garbage bag - leave for a while and the stuff washes right off. The gunk and bag is tossed in the garbage.
__________________
Be an organ donor; give your heart to Jesus.
Exercise daily; walk with the Lord.
licia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2005, 10:41 AM   #14
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 1
I'm new to this forum, but have lurked for a few times. This is an interesting topic that prompts me to wonder how professional kitchens clean their high octane ranges. I work at a university with several dining halls and kitchens. Once a year we get the word that there will be a steam cleaning of facilities. Is this how it's done? Can you clean your grill grates (after being removed) with one of those small steam cleaners?
Dorse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2005, 10:46 AM   #15
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Welcome to the site Dorse
My guess (and it is just a guess) is that those small steam machines do not produce enough steam to really do the job.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2005, 11:04 AM   #16
Senior Cook
 
BBQ Fish's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: State Of CoNfuSioN
Posts: 149
I do the burning method as well, and never used a wire brush on my grill.

If you follow the directions, usually the manufacturer lists a preferred method of grate seasoning to prevent the use of a wire brush.
__________________
The 5150 Chef


El Gringo Caliente
BBQ Fish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2005, 12:23 PM   #17
Assistant Cook
 
bettyslp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Maine
Posts: 1
Send a message via Yahoo to bettyslp
Raine,
Thanks for sharing 'Cleaning your grill precautions' news article and all the good ideas posted after. I have shared the information with many of my friends and family.

Betty
from Maine
bettyslp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2005, 12:39 PM   #18
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: USA,Colorado
Posts: 358
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorse
I'm new to this forum, but have lurked for a few times. This is an interesting topic that prompts me to wonder how professional kitchens clean their high octane ranges. I work at a university with several dining halls and kitchens. Once a year we get the word that there will be a steam cleaning of facilities. Is this how it's done? Can you clean your grill grates (after being removed) with one of those small steam cleaners?
There is a big difference between the small steam cleaners and a proper 'Vapor' cleaner....which is what commercial kitchens use. The small steam cleaners use wet steam, which is usually not under any pressure - it's just like the steam you get from your kettle, but forced through a small hole so that it blasts out, because the steam is not under pressure it doesn't get much above boiling temperature, and it produces very wet steam that condenses easily and drenches the surface you are cleaning. Vapor cleaners on the other hand use steam under pressure (about 5 bars), which superheats the steam to germ-killing temperatures and produces 'dry' steam - i.e. it will not condense and soak surfaces with water very much. You can get quality residential vapor cleaners for around $400 upwards, which are very good. Commercial vapor cleaners are more expensive.

In Europe, residential vapor cleaners are a popular method of cleaning your house - you get germ-killing power without the use of harmful chemicals. I used a 'Polti' vapor cleaner for many years back in England, and now have a continuous fill commercial model over here. I use it for deep cleaning carpets, cabinets, floors, bathrooms, windows, my oven, grill, electrical items that you can't wash easily, killing dust-mites in the furniture, bedding & carpets and anything else that could do with a good deep clean and sanitizing. For more info - look up 'vapor cleaners' on the internet :)

Paint.
__________________

__________________
British ex-pat living in Colorado, USA
Paint is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
×