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Old 09-15-2005, 10:41 PM   #1
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Help needed: very limited diet

My younger brother recently found out he is highly allergic to many common foods. Since eliminating them from his diet he has stopped having stomach upset, felt much better, and started gaining weight to return to a normal level. Unfortunantly, his diet is very limited and his food is becoming rather bland and repetative. I know almost nothing about cooking, and nobody in my family is very qualified. I would like to get together a list of recipies that would add more flavor and variety to his diet.

Things he is allergic too:

Bananas
Cheese
Corn
Eggs
Milk (cow and goat)
Peanuts
Pepper (BW and Green)
Pineapple
Radishes
Sesame
Sugar (cane)
Tomato
Wheat
Yeast (Bakers and Brewers)

If anyone has ideas for any course of a meal, I would appreciate it. I am hoping to get the recipies together and make a book for him to have.

Thanks

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Old 09-15-2005, 10:48 PM   #2
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Hi Lonestar and welcome to DC!! We would like to know what he enjoys to eat to which he is not allergic, also what he particularly dislikes. This will help us to get some idea!!
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Old 09-15-2005, 10:55 PM   #3
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We are from Texas, so that is where the basis of the diet comes from. He will try just about anything, and with his new diet, he just want to have flavor in his food. Desserts are especially difficult, but he is mostly just eating meat and rice based meals right now.

As far as we know, he is not allergic to anything else but what is on the list, though obviously very exotic foods may not have been tested.
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Old 09-15-2005, 11:09 PM   #4
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Try some variety of recipe based with potatoes, beans and lentils, cooked with some vegetables (well, aside from tomatoes and corn...), make it interesting and exciting with a nice blend of spices and herbs...
Also rice noodles (can be found in the oriental food section of a supermarket or specialty shop) are tasty and versatile, either stir fried or as salad.
If you want to give some creamy effect to a recipe try a little coconut milk.
I will get back to you if I think of more useful ideas and try to get together some attractive recipes... right now it is getting to be almost morning, my brain is starting to slow down.... good luck in any case!!
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Old 09-15-2005, 11:39 PM   #5
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With that list of allergies, I just have to say "God Bless Him".
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Old 09-16-2005, 03:00 AM   #6
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Poor thing! I will see what I can find, dessert wise. Just this week I made a sorbet that is delicious.


I just boiled some mixed berries in apple juice (the kind that is sweetened with deflavoured fruit juice) until they were soft, blended it until smooth, threw in some vodka (careful with the amount - you can't taste it in something that cold) and froze it. For the first 5 hours, you have to take it out the freezer every hour and whisk it to prevent sharp crystals from forming. Then it is basically ready, although it's best to freeze for a further 24 hours.

My hubby is allergic to preservatives and he is also hypoglycemic. It is summer here, so I've been making him ice lollies with fruit juice. You know those things we used to have as kids? It's basically a deep ice tray with plastic sticks. I fill it with all his favourite fruit juices and freeze it.
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Old 09-16-2005, 03:21 AM   #7
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This is a very tasty veg curry. My hubby, who normally loves anything meaty, begs for it.

1 tsp oil
1 medium onion, chopped
2 tsp minced garlic
ginger (I hate the stuff!)
2 tsp cumin
2 tsp cilantro (fresh coriander leaves are better)
2 tsp turmeric
2 tsp curry powder
some minced chilli (optional)
pinch of salt
1/2 cup water

1 large potato, cubed
2 cups pumpkin, cubed
1 cup cauliflower florets, cubed
1 tin chickpeas, drained
4 zucchini, thickly sliced

Fry onion and garlic in a saucepan until soft. Add spices and fry for a minute.
Add water and veg (except zucchini) and simmer for 20 minutes. Add zucchini and simmer for a further 10 minutes.

Cooking time is only a guide line. I normally over cook the pumpkin and potato a bit to create a mushy base.
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Old 09-16-2005, 03:27 AM   #8
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First of all welcome to DC!!!!!

OMG that is bad!!
well I don't have a recipe right now, but you can substitude some things....
I would use soy milk instead of cow or goat milk. There are also yogurts made from soy milk. Instead of cane sugar use fructose or a sweetner substitude or honey.

You can bake your own bread, use rye flour and spelt flour. Instead of a yeast bread use sour dough. Later today I'll post a recipe for a sour dough rye bread.
You can also substitude with buckwheat flour, millet flour, soy flour....

There is also cheese available made from tofu and soy.

substitude corn starch with rice flour or potato starch.

I found a vegan website, they make up the following things for 1 egg (depending on the recipe):

- 1 tbsp soy flour with 1-2 tbsp water
- 50g tofu and liqid from the recipe
- 1/2 banana, crushed

if in your recipe eggs are used as a bonding agent you can try the following (depending on the recipe)

- use soy milk, rice milk, coconut milk (always check the sugar content!!)
- crushed bananas
- plain tofu
- quinoa

I'll get back to you with the recipe for the rye sour dough bread and maybe another ideas for recipes later today!

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Old 09-16-2005, 03:29 AM   #9
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Stir fries are also an option. To thicken the sauce, use oat bran. Serve with rice.
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Old 09-16-2005, 03:38 AM   #10
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Quick thread derail: mmmm JoBoBess, that curry looks scrumptious! Thanks for sharing.

No ideas yet on dessert stuff for you brother, Lonestar, but I'll dig around and see what I can come up with.

There are some soy and rice based cheeses that aren't too bad (they'll never ever have the rich taste of the real stuff, but they melt decently and still give that cheese feeling). They even have a Parmesan type soy cheese.


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Old 09-16-2005, 03:43 AM   #11
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This dessert will have to be tweaked. There is a lot of sugar in it, but you can by-pass it with a lot of taste testing. My father-in-law is diabetic, and I make things like this with a lot of honey and fruit juice. Unfortunately, I can't give exact measurements as it's all trial and tasting.

approx. 6 peaches
1 1/2 cups good red wine*
1/2 cup sugar*
2 table spoons honey*
1 stick cinnamon
4 whole cloves
2 tsp cornflour (or oat bran)

*Halve wine, make up volume with sweet red grape juice, and add more honey until sweet enough.

Plunge peaches in boiling water to remove skin. Halve and remove stones. Arrange snugly in a frying pan. Heat wine, juice and honey (and sugar) in another saucepan. Pour over peaces and add spices. Bring to boil, cover and simmer until soft (about 20 minutes), basting often. Remove spices, spoon peaches into a serving dish and leave to cool.

Stir corn flour (oat bran) into juices and boil until thick and syrupy. Spoon over peaches and chill for up to 12 hours. (Or serve warm).
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Old 09-16-2005, 03:56 AM   #12
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A delicious alternative to rice is stuffed gem squash. Or patty pans.

Cook until just tender. For gems, remove seeds. Fill with small veg like peas. I like to do my peas in a bit of margarine and herbs with a pinch of salt. Or I mix all sorts of chopped up things and top with fried mushroom, onion and garlic. And LOTS of black pepper!!!

For the patty pans, you cut off a little 'lid', remove pulp and mix it with yummy things like spring onion, garlic and parsley. Then you put the pulp back in, put on the lid and put them back in the oven until hot.
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Old 09-16-2005, 09:32 AM   #13
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Hi LoneStar, I got a few recipes here for you, I hope I didn't violate any of his limitations and you guy will enjoy these. Also for an idea for sweets, I think granita with fresh fruit sweetened with honey would be a good option!! Anyway here are the recipes....

*Licia's dahl with touch of India (my favourite lentil recipe...)
1 onion
1 carrot
1 big clove of garlic
extra virgine olive oil
1 cup of dry lentils, I like red or yellow version. (they cook much faster)
1 bay leaf
1/4 cup of white wine
water
garam masala (indian mixture of spices)
curry
turmeric
cumin
cardamom
salt
cilantro leaves, chopped (optional)

finely chop the first 3 ingredients and sautè in a sufficient amount of olive oil in a large sauce pan.
When they are well cooked, add bayleaf and the wine and continue to cook over medium-high heat for a few minutes. When the liquid is sufficiently absorbed/evaporated but still the veggies are moist, add lentils, then pour water just to cover the whole thing sufficiently. Bring to boil then continue to simmer.
Add the spices and salt except cardamom. Start from about 1/2 tsp. each (less with cumin), taste as you go and find the right balance for you.
Continue to cook until the lentils are cooked, soft enough but not totally mushed up, if needed adding a little hot water (+ or - 20 minutes).
A couple of minutes before it is done mix in a pinch of ground cardamom.
Serve with chopped leaves of cilantro (fresh coriander)

*Aloo Dum (Indian potato dish)
4 large potatoes peeled and diced
3 medium sized onions
A small piece of ginger
1 clove of garlic
1/2 cup coconut milk
1 tsp garam masala powder
2 1/2 tsp ground coriander
1/2 tsp cumin powder
Salt to taste
ground cardamom
extra virgine olive oil
fresh cilantro leaves, chopped.
* this is a mild version. if you like hot add some chopped green chili or cayenne pepper as needed.
**Also tasty with addition of lightly boiled (not too soft slightly firm) califlower, broccoli or green peas (sautè them with potatoes)!!

Boil the potatoes (not to get them too soft, about 5 minutes).
Saute the potatoes, chopped onion, ginger and garlic with sufficient hot oil till they turn slightly brown.
Add the coconut milk and spices except cardamom, salt to taste.
Bring to boil and simmer till the gravy is thick for about 10 minutes, stirring well.
Add a pinch of cardamom just before the finish, mix well..
Garnish with the chopped coriander leaves.

*rosemary roasted potatoes (very simple!)
Peel and cube the potatoes.
Coat well with extra virgine olive oil, salt, and rosemary leaves.
Bake it in the oven at 200C/400F until potatoes are golden, about 25min + or -

*mushroom risotto (a very very tasty way to enjoy rice!)

1 large onion, chopped
250g/1/2lb of mushrooms, chopped
extra virgine olive oil
1 cup carnaroli or arborio rice
1 bayleaf
1/2 cup white wine
500-700ml/20-25 oz. HOT good quality stock
chopped flat leaf parsley

Sautè onion and mushrooms in plenty of olive oil in a large sauce pan until they are thoroughly cooked.
Add the rice, continue to sautè mixing briskly for a couple of minutes, until the rice is semi-transparent.
Drop the bayleaf and add the wine, bring to the boil quickly and let the wine get absorbed.
Then start adding the stock, about 1 large ladle at a time, stirring often. As the stock get absorbed (but still sufficiently wet) continue to add the stock in the same fashion, STIRRING OFTEN. Continue the procedure until the rice is cooked al dente (not too mushy). It should take about 20-25 minutes. Sprinke the parsley over and serve.
(This "add the stock little by little" method is to coat the each and every morsel of rice with the flavour, at the end you can really taste the difference. A little tedious but every bit worth it!!)

*Oriental Rice noodles.
First you soak the noodles in plenty of cold water for about 15 minutes then drain well.
To stir fry-
First you sautè thinly sliced veggies (onion, scallion, carrots, bell peppers, zucchini, mushrooms etc.) in extra virgin olive oil with garlic, ginger and salt, using a large skillet or wok. Seasoning variation is to add a little curry flavour, or substitute salt for a dash of teriyaki sauce. When the veggies are almost done, add the noodles, mix everything well until hot.

For salad-
Boil the noodle quickly, just for a minute or two until the noodles are flexible. Drain and cool it in cold running water.
Toss it with julieneed veggies and your choice of dressing---I particularly enjoy it with my creation, papaya seed dressing. I already posted this recipe under "Salads and Salad Dressings section", dated 11 September. To make this just replace sugar with honey. Check it out!)
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Old 09-16-2005, 09:54 AM   #14
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Hi Lonestar,

I posted the recipe for the rye sour dough bread (and also for making the rye sour dough) in the bread forum!

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Old 09-16-2005, 10:31 AM   #15
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certain acids, enzymes, and yeasts. well, while alot of what we eat is produced or contains these items, a whole lot more doesn't. there are lots of things to do...# 1 work with a dietician, a nutricianist, and find a health food store so you can get stuff like soy milk, quinoa, organic items and a whole range of recipes etc. THere is a chance that many spices will trigger problems since pepper does..Many are dried seeds or berries. But many herbs may well be ok for flavoring. And there are all kinds of vegetables out there that are wonderful for roasting and grilling and chowing down on. Boiling a veg is tasteless. ROasting gives you great flavor. WHat kinds of acid? can lemmon juice be used? a great flavor enhancer.. If not, there are other items...smoke flavorings such as smoked salts.
Is beet sugar ok?
RIce ...all kinds, and rice flour.
Beans etc.
a person can live on rice and beans.
THere are web sites for vegans and organics and specific food needs so this is a great age of info. ANd please share what you find out there with us.
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Old 09-16-2005, 10:31 AM   #16
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Thank you so much for all the responses, I am writing everything down as I get it. So many things I had not thought about or known.

Thanks again
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Old 09-17-2005, 02:53 PM   #17
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You might try googling gluten free recipes and go from there. For the milk, is it a true allergy or a lactose intolerance? If it is the latter, there is a product called lact-aid that can be added to milk to handle the lactose. Soy milk is another option. Good luck!
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Old 09-18-2005, 10:45 AM   #18
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hi lonestar, i am an allergy kid, too. well, not a kid anymore, but i grew up with food allergies. first of all, remember that most soy cheeses contain casien, which is a milk product. for this reason, i cant eat fake cheese unless it is labeled vegan... and the vegan cheeses are hard to find even in my area. if you can get them, Paul Newman brand wheat free dairy free fig newmans are one of my favorite deserts... there is also a brand of rice based "ice cream" that is sweetened with fruit, very tastey and no cane sugar... i like the chocolate, myself. in baking, i have found that spelt, oat and rye flours, depending on the recipe, are quite tasty.

i am allergic to cow dairy, and i can only eat wheat in small amounts... when i was a kid i could not eat it at all. i ate a lot of alternative breads, rice bread, spelt bread... but be aware that spelt and barley specificly are very closely related to wheat. try a search on the internet for a good vegan cooking site for ideas about how to cook without dairy or eggs... i have also found that in baking a reduced down rice or soy milk works just as well as cow milk. also, cream can be substituted with blended soft tofu.

because of my allergies, i do a lot of asian style cooking... look into some thai, chinese, or japanese dishes. i also eat a lot of curries, and learning about indian spices has made my diet much more interesting and flavorful. spices are your best friend when you cant have the flavor or richness of butter and dairy.

when i get home i will look through my recipes for you and see what i can find. my food allergies are actually what motivated me to learn how to cook for myself, because i was so bored of fish/tofu/chicken and rice with veggies, which was my standard diet for a long long time.
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Old 09-18-2005, 10:58 AM   #19
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thers always chicken and sauteeing that in onions and then braising it in chicken stock with parsley and wine
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Old 10-08-2005, 06:23 AM   #20
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For some people, you'd be amazed what instant mashed potatoes can do. Make sure he checks it with his doctor first, but you can use it to "bread" meats and thicken gravies, soup, and stews. When someone has so many allergies I'd check anything he hasn't had before cooking with it. But the flakes (they come in flakes and buds) can replace a lot of wheat products. They're especially good as a replacement for panko!
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