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Old 06-12-2006, 02:50 PM   #1
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Question Is whole-grain bread healthier for diabetics?

I was wondering this, as i heard somewhere that it is.

It's very low in carbs, has 0 cholesterol and very little sodium, but the thing that I'm worried about is how much starch does it contain?

Your thoughts, please.


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Old 06-12-2006, 03:07 PM   #2
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Whole grains are generally better for everyone because they contain fewer calories and more nutrition. As for diabetics, the whole wheat or whole grain breads usually contain fewer carbohydrates than white breads. Included in the carbohydrate component of whole grain breads is a greater fiber content and even though fiber is considered a carb, fiber does not get digested by the body but is passed through the digestive system unchanged. Because of this, fiber does not raise blood sugar levels.

Compare: http://www.calorie-count.com/calories/item/18075.html

with: http://www.calorie-count.com/calories/item/18069.html

While this is a good general guideline there is no hard and fast rule that whole wheat breads are lower in calories and carbs than white breads. So the general rule of read the label is still important.
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Old 06-12-2006, 03:21 PM   #3
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I think the American Diabetes Assocition recommends it over white, whole wheat and other breads.

And yes, whole grain IS a great fiber, and it DOES pass through the digestive system unchanged. The body doesn't get the opportunity to process or break it down - leaving no chance of starch or sugars from it to get into the blood stream.


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Old 06-12-2006, 03:53 PM   #4
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I'm no expert! Take no action on my say-so!!!

I can't explain the science, but I believe whole grain is better for diabetics and the rest of us. Something to do with the rate of absorption and the nutrients and fiber.

For myself, I've committed to using whole grains as much as possible. To that end, I have red and white whole grain wheat flour in the freezer. I want to wean myself, as much as possible, from the AP, bread, and cake flour in the cupboard.

I also have used up all the white rice and now only use brown rice.

A little more esoteric, but I'm making my own masa for tortillas etc. from whole kernel dent corn.

As for starch; I hope someone smarter than me can address the topic.
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Old 06-12-2006, 03:54 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey123
I think the American Diabetes Assocition recommends it over white, whole wheat and other breads.

And yes, whole grain IS a great fiber, and it DOES pass through the digestive system unchanged. The body doesn't get the opportunity to process or break it down - leaving no chance of starch or sugars from it to get into the blood stream.
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By definition, fiber is indigestible and no matter how long it remains in the digestive tract it will not be absorbed. (Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary defines fiber as "indigestible material in human food that stimulates the intestine to peristalsis -- called also bulk, roughage").
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Old 06-12-2006, 04:01 PM   #6
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Yes, and that is also true with salad.

Most of it passes right through the digestive track, and very little, if any, gets processed and absorbed into the body.

In the case of fiber, such as oatmeal, bran and wheat cereal, the majority of it will sit there and ferment, sort of like yeast does when it feeds off of sugar - creating sometimes embarrassing gas and some bloating.

But, like you said whole grain leaves no chance of that.


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Old 06-12-2006, 04:52 PM   #7
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Whole grains are complex carbs which break down to glucose more slowly. This site has some good info about that:

http://www.weightlossforall.com/complex-carbs.htm

This site has some really good information about whole grains in connection with diabetes.

http://www.diabetesselfmanagement.co...e.cfm?aid=2208

This is information that can be beneficial to all of us, not just diabetics.
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Old 06-12-2006, 05:04 PM   #8
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Maybe THAT'S why the ADA strongly suggests that we eat whole-grain bread. To stem the onslaught of glucose getting into the blood from it.

And yes, it IS beneficial to everyone!


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Old 06-12-2006, 05:08 PM   #9
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Fiber is good for you, but with some people like myself, It produces gas in the intestines.


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Old 06-12-2006, 05:18 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey123
To stem the onslaught of glucose getting into the blood from it.
That is exaxtly the reason.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey123
Fiber is good for you, but with some people like myself, It produces gas in the intestines.
This will subside the more you eat it. The same goes for beans, the more you eat of them, the less they "upset" the system. Daily recommendation for fiber is 30grams+ per day. Start tracking it you will be surprised how little most people actually consume.
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Old 06-12-2006, 05:38 PM   #11
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On your first answer, yes, I thought so.

As for your 2nd suggestion, unfortunately, that doesn't work with me. The more of those things I eat, the more the system suffers that metobolic imbalance.

I DO have some Beano somewhere around the house, but I can't find it, so I'm going top have to get some more.


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Old 06-12-2006, 05:50 PM   #12
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There are two kinds of fiber, insoluble and soluble.

Insoluble is found in wheat, rye, bran, and other grains and in most vegetables. "Insoluble" means it does not dissolve in water. It also cannot be used by intestinal-colon bacteria as a food source, so these beneficial bacteria generally do not grow and produce intestinal gas.

Soluble fiber dissolves in water forming a gelatinous substance in your body and is found in things such as oatmeal, oat bran, fruit, psyllium (Metamucil, Konsyl), barley & legumes. Soluble fiber also seems to bind up cholesterol allowing it to be eliminated. If enough is removed it can lower the blood cholesterol 10-15%.


The down side of soluble fiber is that it can be metabolized by gas forming bacteria in the colon. These bacteria are harmless but for those who have an intestinal gas or flatus problem it is probably best to avoid or carefully test soluble fibers to see if they are contributing to intestinal gas.



Whenever possible, both soluble and insoluble fiber should be eaten on a daily basis.




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Old 06-12-2006, 06:11 PM   #13
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Yes, I heard that oatmeal, wheat and bran are good sources for absorbing and eliminating the bad cholesterol in the body, especially for the heart, the main motor that pumps the blood.

But I still eat those things because they are a proven source of fiber promoting good health and eating habits.


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Old 06-12-2006, 07:38 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey123
I was wondering this, as i heard somewhere that it is.

It's very low in carbs, has 0 cholesterol and very little sodium, but the thing that I'm worried about is how much starch does it contain?

Your thoughts, please.


~Corey123.
Corey,
one of the things to do is check the label on the bread, it will tell you the amount of carbs and sugar per slice. You want as low as possibe and sugar 3grams. or less..I won't keep beating you over the head with this but, if you test, you will know how much is to much with sugars and starch. We tend to try to cut out all pasta,rice,breads and after awhileit gets downrigh OLD count the carbs and TEST and you will learn and quickly just how much to eat. You could chase yourself forever trying to get pizza sauce or crust low-sugar, it's how much of that crust that you eat that makes the diff! I myself can handle about 1-1/2 slices of pizza and be fine, anymore and the b/g goes up..So reg is allowed if you learn to count carbs and watch portions. Also, I should have said earlier, I try to stay away from white flours and eat wheat, or grain breads, I feel they are healthier,but I think they taste better. okay enough I'll leave you alone

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Old 06-12-2006, 08:56 PM   #15
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I've done that before I bought it.


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Old 06-13-2006, 03:11 AM   #16
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Another good thing about the high fiber foods is the fact that when they pass thru they take junk with them out of the system. Our colonoscopy doctor (can't remember the name) told me to take phayzyme if all the fibrous stuff causes gas or bloating. It really seems to work and no side effects of that. She said you can take several if you need to, but they are a bit costly and I haven't needed it but a couple of times.
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Old 06-13-2006, 04:25 AM   #17
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I'll try it.


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Old 06-13-2006, 02:26 PM   #18
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Corey, I sympathise. Husband tries to go for more whole grains, but often when we look at the carb counts to keep the numbers right, there are more carbs. It is very frustrating. The fact is you cannot get all the numbers right. Something that is perfect for your high cholesterol may be terrible for your diabetes and disasterous for your liver or kidneys or .... you have to balance. I do most of the shopping myself, and have a guideline for #of carbs per serving (husband is doing well with 30/30/60 for meals, and fruit snacks of about 15 3 or 4 times a day). So I buy him a loaf of bread that has I think 13 per slice. It isn't whole grain, but it fits in with his diet better than most of the whole grains do. I definitely is a juggling act!
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Old 06-13-2006, 04:57 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire
Corey, I sympathise. Husband tries to go for more whole grains, but often when we look at the carb counts to keep the numbers right, there are more carbs. It is very frustrating. The fact is you cannot get all the numbers right. Something that is perfect for your high cholesterol may be terrible for your diabetes and disasterous for your liver or kidneys or .... you have to balance. I do most of the shopping myself, and have a guideline for #of carbs per serving (husband is doing well with 30/30/60 for meals, and fruit snacks of about 15 3 or 4 times a day). So I buy him a loaf of bread that has I think 13 per slice. It isn't whole grain, but it fits in with his diet better than most of the whole grains do. I definitely is a juggling act!


I think also, that it depends on the brand of whole-grain bread that you buy as well. And you're right, part of it IS balance.

You have to weigh and test the waters - meaning that you must juggle between having a little more carbs and a little more of other things like starch and sugars.

I'm not so much watching carbs, as my doctor said no to a low-carb diet when I asked him about it. The key elements that I must control are starch, fats and sugars.

I've been having at least 2 slices of whole-grain bread in the morning with a
smear of low-cal spread. I would then have a bowl of high-fiber cereal with about 4 oz. 1% milk.

But I just saw a commerial on TV now advetising whole-grain tortillas. That might be something to look into.


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