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Old 05-13-2022, 09:58 PM   #1
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Tamales

I have .never made a tamale in my life. I am a black American who does not care for soul food except cornmeal dishes. I moved to Phoenix from NYC and tasted tamales for the first time. It is my desire to make a sweet tamale with a savoury meat filling. Does such a recipe exist?

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Old 05-14-2022, 01:43 AM   #2
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Tamales are all about the masa dough that surrounds the filling. I've had desert tamales, savory tamales, and tamales with a shredded pork, and BBQ sauce filling. They were all good.

, Masa Harina is used to make the dough, which is put as a thin layer on a soaked corn husk. A tbs. or two of filling is placed in the center, and the husk is closed so as to encase the filling in the dough. The tamales are then steamed until the dough is cooked.

I've also used parchment paper instead of corn husks to make the tamales. Examples of sweet tamales:
tamales.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q...tail&FORM=VIRE

https://ftw.usatoday.com/2017/11/tai...ood-ideas-easy

In the U.S., we tend to think of tamales with a savory pork filling, and steeped in a spicy tomato sauce. Tamales can be much more than that, as seen from the above links.

Tip: tamales are best made with friends, and family. Sharing the work brings you together, and divides the work load. Everyone can enjoy the results of the work.

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Old 05-14-2022, 09:18 AM   #3
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In Texas tamales are a favorite food, especially around Christmas. I have never had one. Other than a banana, I don't like food you have to peel. Maybe that's why I don't like oranges either.

A Hispanic friend gathers her entire female side of the family in her kitchen and they make dozens of tamales for Christmas. I save my corn husks for her. How she keeps them from July to December is a mystery to me.
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Old 05-14-2022, 09:46 AM   #4
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I learned to make tamales by watching this video by Marcela Valladolid on the Food Network. I love the flavor of the fresh corn kernels in the masa: https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/...recipe-1954054

This has a couple of recipes for fillings for I like to put in the above tamale recipe: https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/...amales-2459357

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Old 05-14-2022, 02:25 PM   #5
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Typically, in South America, tamales are not "stuffed". You simply use corn meal, which is a staple, and mix in some pork, chicken, or what ever is left over, wrap a corn husk around it, and steam it.
IŽve eaten them in Mexico, in Colombia, in Venezuela and in Ecuador. They are not "gourmet" items and neither do you have to have a recipe for them. As I said, just use what ever is left over from yesterday.
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Old 05-14-2022, 03:17 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karadekoolaid View Post
Typically, in South America, tamales are not "stuffed". You simply use corn meal, which is a staple, and mix in some pork, chicken, or what ever is left over, wrap a corn husk around it, and steam it.

IŽve eaten them in Mexico, in Colombia, in Venezuela and in Ecuador. They are not "gourmet" items and neither do you have to have a recipe for them. As I said, just use what ever is left over from yesterday.
We're Americans - we like to jazz things up

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Old 05-14-2022, 06:15 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karadekoolaid View Post
Typically, in South America, tamales are not "stuffed". You simply use corn meal, which is a staple, and mix in some pork, chicken, or what ever is left over, wrap a corn husk around it, and steam it.
IŽve eaten them in Mexico, in Colombia, in Venezuela and in Ecuador. They are not "gourmet" items and neither do you have to have a recipe for them. As I said, just use what ever is left over from yesterday.
If tamales are an everyday menu item, then sure, use what's left from yesterday. If they are a once in a great while treat, then it seems appropriate to put more effort and more interesting ingredients into them.

Now, I'm curious. When you write "corn meal", do you mean ground, nixtamalized corn or just ground, dried, maize kernels?
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Old 05-15-2022, 03:07 AM   #8
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When you write "corn meal", do you mean ground, nixtamalized corn or just ground, dried, maize kernels?
Language differences!! Corn meal in Latin America could be nixtamalized corn, as in Mexico, or processed white/yellow corn, as in Venezuelan/Colombian arepas, or processed ground yellow corn.
Cornflour (UK) is cornstarch (US)
Cornmeal (UK) is probably maize flour (US)
In the UK, youŽd use cornmeal to make polenta.
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Old 05-15-2022, 05:51 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by karadekoolaid View Post
Language differences!! Corn meal in Latin America could be nixtamalized corn, as in Mexico, or processed white/yellow corn, as in Venezuelan/Colombian arepas, or processed ground yellow corn.

Cornflour (UK) is cornstarch (US)

Cornmeal (UK) is probably maize flour (US)

In the UK, youŽd use cornmeal to make polenta.
They're not just language differences - they're are different types of corn processed in different ways. We don't use the term "maize flour" in the US. It's cornmeal (finely ground dried field corn). We use coarsely ground field dried field corn for polenta and grits. We also have masa harina.
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Old 05-15-2022, 06:10 PM   #10
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A lot of people don't realize that "corn" means a grain. At the time of the colonization of Turtle Island, corn still meant wheat in England. "Corn" meaning maize was shortened from "Indian corn". The Scots meant oats when they said (or maybe even when they say it now) corn. I have noticed Americans getting confused about Swedish recipes that call for "korn". No, it's not maize. In Swedish, that is barley.
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Old 05-16-2022, 02:50 AM   #11
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"They're not just language differences - they're are different types of corn processed in different ways."
No - youŽll find cornmeal is exactly the same as cornflour in the UK. Used for thickening , mostly.
As for maize flour - dunno what youŽd call that then. What do you call rough ground yellow or white corn?
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Old 05-16-2022, 04:01 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karadekoolaid View Post
"They're not just language differences - they're are different types of corn processed in different ways."
No - youŽll find cornmeal is exactly the same as cornflour in the UK. Used for thickening , mostly.
As for maize flour - dunno what youŽd call that then. What do you call rough ground yellow or white corn?
"Cornflour in the UK" is called cornstarch (fine ground corn) in the USA to thicken.
"Rough ground yellow or white corn" depending on how rough is called cornmeal, polenta or grits in the USA.
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Old 05-16-2022, 07:09 AM   #13
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THanks, msmofet!
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Old 05-16-2022, 07:47 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by msmofet View Post
"Cornflour in the UK" is called cornstarch (fine ground corn) in the USA to thicken.
"Rough ground yellow or white corn" depending on how rough is called cornmeal, polenta or grits in the USA.
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Originally Posted by karadekoolaid View Post
THanks, msmofet!
Cornstarch, cornmeal and polenta/grits are all different products processed differently, thus they have different names. Masa harina is another product - nixtamalized, dried, finely ground corn.
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Old 05-16-2022, 04:16 PM   #15
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I have two kinds of cornmeal "grit", fine and coarse. I use the fine for baked goods, sometimes in combination with the coarse depending on what I want the final texture to be. I use the coarse one when making polenta/grits.
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Old 05-16-2022, 04:21 PM   #16
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Crud, those are supposed to be "fine cornMEAL" and "coarse cornMEAL". Sorry...
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