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Old 06-30-2010, 04:18 PM   #1
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Sault Ste. Marie, United Way Chili Cookoff

Anybody in the U.P. Michigan area on August 10, I'll be competing this year in the hot category. I won the white chili category last year. It's gonna be a good time. It will be open between 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. If you are planning on being a tourist in the Eastern Upper Peninsula at that time, I'd sure enjoy rubbing elbows.

Oh, and I'm going to be making some authentic, Cowboy Texas Red. And don't think for a minute that a yooper doesn't know a thing or two about cowboy chili. I did live in the Southwest for ten years.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

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Old 06-30-2010, 08:11 PM   #2
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i would be willing to bet that you will win. good luck
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Old 06-30-2010, 09:13 PM   #3
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Old 07-01-2010, 08:41 AM   #4
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Good luck and have fun with it.

And light em up with the chili.
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Old 07-01-2010, 08:45 AM   #5
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Good luck, GW. I'm confident you'll do well. We expect to see a picture of you holding the trophy/blue ribbon posted here, along with the winning recipe.
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Old 07-01-2010, 10:02 PM   #6
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Michigan, or at least Sault Ste. Marie has regulations that state the chili must be cooked in a "Health Department Certified Kitchen" with three sinks for sanitizing and everything. Can't use anything made at home or out of my personal garden. Fortunately, I'm friends and a patron of many vendors from out local farmer's market. And I can use fresh ingredients from there. I expect that they'll sponsor me again this year (I still have to purchase most of the ingredients myself though). This gives me a bit of an edge. And the meat processor who will be supplying my beef told me to give her 9 days notice and she'll smoke some beef for me to use in my Texas Red, so long as I save her a bowl or two.

Two years back, one of the vendors, who had more tomatoes at season's end than they could sell, or knew what to do with asked me to create a cream of tomato soup recipe for her. She gave me a sack of ripe tomatoes to work with. I said OK. I made my first ever batch of - from scratch - cream of tomato soup, with fresh herbs, real cream, and fresh-picked ripe tomatoes. It came out pretty good. I made sure to document the recipe as I made the soup. I took a hardcopy of it to the vendor along with a thermos full of hot soup. She tried it, loved it, and insisted on giving me a bushel basket full of ripe tomatoes.

Sometimes it just pays to know how to cook. Two of the restaurants in the area have given me free food at different times. They wanted me to test new recipes that they were making. I was happy to oblige. All in all, knowing how to make good food has served me very well. The only issue I have with the skill is that some of my friends refuse to make some of the things I'm known for at out church pot lucks. They said they won't compete with me. But I'm not competing. I love trying other people's versions of dishes that I make. I always learn knew things from it. And really, no kidding aside, I'm really a pretty humble guy. I don't want to intimidate anyone. I like to work with people, not for them or compete with them. Well, I like to compete where competition is the name of the game, like in the chili cook-off, and in a few bread cook offs-that I've been in (local Church competitions and such).

Cooking should be something shared and enjoyed by friends and family. That's the way I look at it anyways.

Thanks everyone for the well wishes and support.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 07-02-2010, 08:59 AM   #7
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i wish i could be there, gw. good luck with your texas red.

here's a pic of my latest "white" chili (really diahrrea brown, lol) for inspriation.



and my boy says good luck as well



hey, anyone remember a thread a long time ago between audeo and lifter about texas chili? man, it seems like a lifetime ago.
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Old 07-02-2010, 12:02 PM   #8
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Good Luck GW....Keep us posted........
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Old 07-06-2010, 04:30 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
i wish i could be there, gw. good luck with your texas red.

here's a pic of my latest "white" chili (really diahrrea brown, lol) for inspriation.



and my boy says good luck as well



hey, anyone remember a thread a long time ago between audeo and lifter about texas chili? man, it seems like a lifetime ago.
BT; I have her recipe for Texas Red and the dialog of the post to go with it. It seems she received the recipe for the Governor of Texas, or so says the post. And I trust that Audio was the real deal. wish she was still around.

Gotta love the bread bowls. You're chili isn't as white as my prize winner was last year, but I bet it tastes amazing.

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Old 07-06-2010, 04:57 PM   #10
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oh, neat. do you think you could repost audeo's recipe, with any of your tweaks of course, to make it legitimate?

i'm quite sure you must have tweaked the recipe; i can't imagine you not trying out 17 things before you get it perfect.

btw, how do you get your white chili whiter? (please don't say ancient chinese secret, lol)

the chili powder i used is so red from paprika that it darkened the chili considerably.
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Old 07-06-2010, 05:12 PM   #11
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Bucky; This one's for you. Notice, no red ingredients but lots of chili flavor.

2009 Sault Ste. Marie, United Way Chili Cook-off, 1rst-place Prize-Winning Recipe, White Chili Category – Bob Flowers’ White Chili

In past years, I made this same basic recipe, but with chicken or pork as the meat, and with more potent hot peppers. So this year, I tweaked the herbs and spices, changed to ground pork, and reduced the heat. Everyone who has tried this recipe has fallen in love with it. It’s not as pretty as red chili, but it sure does taste great. Try this recipe on a cool fall night. It’ll warm you to your toes.

Ingredients:
* 24 oz. (3 cups) Great Northern Beans, cooked
* 24 oz. Pinto Beans, cooked
* ½ cup Salsa Verde (available in most grocery stores)
* 1 large white onion, diced
* ½ cup chopped green onion
* 1 tbs. Sriracha brand Pepper Sauce
* 2 tbs. Coriander, ground
* 1 tbs. Cumin, ground
* 2 stalks Celery, sliced with leaves
* 1 ½ lb. Ground Pork
* 2 tsp. Kosher Salt, or 1 ½ tsp. table salt
* 3 tbs. fresh Cilantro, chopped
* 2, one-inch Serrano Chile Peppers, minced
* ½ tsp. white pepper, ground (or you can use black pepper)
* 2 cups heavy cream (1 pint)
* ½ cup Masa Harina (can be found next to the corn meal at
your grocers)
* 3 tbs. cooking oil

Heat the oil in a large pan. Add the diced onion. Sauté over medium heat while stirring until the onion begins to soften (about 2 minutes). Add the ground beef and flatten out. Let cook for about 5 minutes and then break it up. Stir and cook until the meat has lightly browned. Add the remaining ingredients, except for the Masa Harina, and reduce heat to a simmer. Cover and cook for two hours, stirring every twenty minutes or so to prevent the chili from sticking. Taste the chili and correct the seasoning to your taste (add more salt if needed).
Place the Masa Harina into an eight ounce cup along with just enough water to form a thick paste. Stir with a fork until all the lumps are removed. Slowly stir in two tbs. more water. This is called slurry. Stir the Masa Harina slurry into the chili, and again cover. Let it all cook over low heat for an additional ten minutes. Stir and test to see if the chili is thick enough for you. If so, then you are ready to serve up a bowl- full or two to your family. But remember, like all great chili, this is even better the next day. So if you can, cool it in an ice bath and place in the refrigerator for tomorrow’s dinner. Serve it with some good cornbread, or nachos.
From the kitchen of Bob Flowers

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 07-06-2010, 05:25 PM   #12
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Best of luck Goodweed, I just know you're gonna knock it outta the ballpark... Please keep us posted and maybe you can throw in a few pic's...
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Old 07-07-2010, 03:08 AM   #13
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Goodweed, best of luck in the upcoming contest. I enjoyed reading your posts and they piqued my curiosity about this chili cookoff as the rules and categories are different from what I'm used to here on the West Coast, and I wondered if the contests in the Midwest aredifferent from this part of the country or is it unique to Michigan.
I hope you won't mind commenting as it's really interesting to compare. For example, the chili cookoffs I've competed in don't have a separate "hot" or "white chili" category, and including beans is verboten. We have only two categories, red and green chili
Anyway, thanks for your posts as I haven't competed in about 5 years and they've inspired me to do it again!
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Old 07-08-2010, 01:25 AM   #14
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Goodweed, best of luck in the upcoming contest. I enjoyed reading your posts and they piqued my curiosity about this chili cookoff as the rules and categories are different from what I'm used to here on the West Coast, and I wondered if the contests in the Midwest aredifferent from this part of the country or is it unique to Michigan.
I hope you won't mind commenting as it's really interesting to compare. For example, the chili cookoffs I've competed in don't have a separate "hot" or "white chili" category, and including beans is verboten. We have only two categories, red and green chili
Anyway, thanks for your posts as I haven't competed in about 5 years and they've inspired me to do it again!
You have to understand that chili is a regional kind of thing. Though it was a meal created for cowboys on the trail, it is famous all over the U.S. and Canada. But in the upper Midwest, that is, Wisconsin and all things eastward, especially around the Great Lakes states, chili is made like hearty soup with lots of tomato both as the soup base, and as a vegetable (chunks of fresh tomatoes cooked in), celery, onion, chili powder, usually not more than moderate heat (which is quite spicy for many around here), kidney beans, and ground beef. It is flavorful and satisfying. It will fill your belly and is an extremely healthy meal. Some people add roux to thicken it for a hot dog topping, while others add rice and cook it in.

I lived in the San Diego area for about 11 years or so, and was introduced to a con carne block, and various hispanic variations of that wonderful dish called chili. And so I have a little different take on it than do most people in my neck of the woods. I make a chili that is a combination of both. I usually enter two different batches of chili. Each has to be made in a health department certified kitchen, and use ingredients from a comercial enterprise, such as a grocery store, or farmer's market. I can't use ingredients from my own garden, or anything that has been in my home. The I have to make a minimum of three gallons of chili for each category I enter. The categories are:
1. Mild chili
2. Hot Chili
3. White Chili
4. Professional mild chili
5, Professional hot chili

This event is well attended by the public and each visitor has the opportunity to buy ticket to stuff in the can of their favorite chili maker. The person with the most tickets wins the popular choice chili. Usually, the person with the most relatives wins that category.

Then, there are three panels of judges chosen from the "public", that means political big-wigs. One group for mild, one for hot, and one for the white chili category.

After several years of competing and tasting white "chili" that tasted a lot like cream of chicken soup, I decided to make a white chili that tasted like chili. I used coriander, cumin, and various yellow peppers, fresh and dried to achieve the chili flavor. I added depth with cilantro. I thickened with a bit of Masa Harina to give it a light tortilla flavor. I almost feel like I won by default, as no other white chili entered tasted anything like chili. So this year, I'm going to introduce the judges to a true Texas style, hot chili, using smoked beef, various peppers, herbs, spices, and onions only, with a bit of cilantro, cumin, and coriander, with added passion and love. The only thing I have to worry about is making it too hot, and yet hot enough to give it sufficient kick. I made a batch of white chili a couple years back that I wanted to enter into the hot chili category. But the powers that be forced me to enter it into the white chili category. I overheard one of the judges exclaim that my chili was so hot they couldn't even taste it. I didn't think it was that spicy myself.

So, it's a balancing act between making it "way spicy" for Midwestern palates, without destroying the gentle taste-buds of the judges. It will be interesting, and fun.
Mostly, this chili cook-off is a money maker for the United Way. All I know is that there are numerous competitors who leave with half of their chili not eaten, while all six gallons of mine are completely gone, and I get a lot of people returning to my booth every year. That's good enough for me.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 07-08-2010, 01:30 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
oh, neat. do you think you could repost audeo's recipe, with any of your tweaks of course, to make it legitimate?

i'm quite sure you must have tweaked the recipe; i can't imagine you not trying out 17 things before you get it perfect.

btw, how do you get your white chili whiter? (please don't say ancient chinese secret, lol)

the chili powder i used is so red from paprika that it darkened the chili considerably.
Audio's Recipe:

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Posted: 21-Oct-2004 04:55 PM Post subject: Original "Authentic" Texas Chili...for the record
Chili is a serious subject across this continent and everyone has their own way of making it, as Lifter kindly mentioned in his delicious post on the subject. But, as requested by dear Alix, here is the recipe for “authentic” Texas Chili, given to me by Texas Gov. Ann Richards, avid hunter, great cook, and downright warm, wonderful gal.

As I mentioned under Lifter’s recipe, with tongue in cheek, Texans claim that chili is a Texas creation, a Texas invention, and a Texas tradition! It was created as a cheap food for cowboys, one that could easily be made while riding the hard trails and that would also travel well. In other words, it was quick and easy to make, but could be made to serve lots of people over a long period of time. Following the herds across country, a group of cowboys could start a pot of chili and continually add meat scraps and fat to the pot over the weeks as they traveled…and it only got better as the trail went on.

Think about this for a minute from an historical standpoint. Chili was cowboy food…food made by and for cowboys traveling across the ranges away from civilization back in the 1800s. There were no canned tomatoes, and certainly no fresh tomatoes on the trail. There were no pasta makers, and there certainly weren't any beans very often in real life. (Beans were dried (of course) and required you to soak them in water for a day or more and then boil them for hours more just to make them edible...a whole lots of inconvenient work.) Chili is fast, easy food, and is made up of nothing but ingredients you can travel with safely without refrigeration, or scrounge around and find while you're on the trail. That limited the ingredients to only a few things: meat, chili powder, and possibly a few wild leaks, onions, or a little garlic, and maybe a few wild vegetables on top of that, but darned little.

I encourage you to try this recipe at least once, so you will understand how far this dish has come to its present variations a century and a half later.

Here's how to make real Texas Cowboy Chili. Start with the following ingredients:

2 pounds of coarsely ground beef (not lean!)
2 ounces of animal fat (bacon grease or beef suet--the pork fat is a little better)
2 cloves minced garlic
1 large chopped onion
3-5 tablespoons chili powder (McCormick's is authentic enough, although you can mix your own with cumin, ground red pepper, oregano, cumin, black pepper and salt if you're really, really serious…)

And that’s it -- the entire ingredient list. Nothing more.

First, render your pork or beef fat by frying it over low heat until it melts. An iron skillet is best if you want to be really authentic. Remove the rinds from the fat, if any, then add the coarse ground beef. Brown the beef lightly over medium heat, until it just begins to turn brown. Then add the minced garlic and chopped onions.

Do not drain ANY of the fat off. (I know, I know...!) Continue to cook.

Once the onions begin to become translucent, slowly start sprinkling in the chili powder, stirring slowly and gently as you add it. Once it's blended, reduce the heat and let the chili simmer at a very low, mildly bubbling heat for at least two hours. Stir the chili gently every half hour or so.

Add salt to taste. You shouldn't need much though!

You will notice that the consistency of this chili changes rather dramatically over time, becoming thicker the longer it cooks. You can add a little water if it gets too thick, but keep in mind that it's supposed to be thick – I’ve met more than a few “serious” Texas Chili folk who will tell you that a spoon should stand up if you stick it into a bowl of real chili!

That's it! Two hours, and the chili is ready to eat. However, the longer it cooks, the better it will be! Cook it four hours, six hours, eight hours…start it in the morning and eat it for dinner, whatever. Refrigerate the chili and reheat it the next day, and it will taste even better still!

Sound boring? You will be absolutely astounded with how good it is. Feel free to add a fresh, sliced jalapeno or two for a nice kick. A SINGLE fresh tomato chopped into the mix isn't too far from the original to be sacrilegious to a native Texan. A single chopped green pepper might not hurt either. However, I encourage you to try the plain, original recipe at least once, to understand what it was and perhaps, even, how far the dish has evolved.

Hope you enjoy it, and I hope you'll try the real thing at least once in your life!


** This recipe is attributed to Jim Perry, an exceptional cowboy, cook and fiddler who worked on the XIT Ranch, located primarily in the Texas Panhandle. Jim, by the way, was one of many African-American cowboys that our history has only recently begun to celebrate.

The XIT Ranch (XIT=Ten in Texas) included land in ten counties and was one of the largest ranches in the history of our nation. Its lands were sold to a Chicago company in exchange for constructing our state capitol building, which was completed in 1888.

The exact date of this recipe is unknown, but is estimated to have been created somewhere around 1840.
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Old 07-08-2010, 07:58 AM   #16
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wow, thank you so much, gw!!! you're the best! copied and saved both. karma for that.

have you thought about using meat that is cubed very small rather than ground meat? i think some of my best chillis have been when i had a london broil, or chuck roast, or even a lamb roast that i needed to use up before it went bad. without the ability to grind the meat, i cubed the meat into tiny 1/8" squares before browning.
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Old 07-08-2010, 08:28 AM   #17
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I always cube chuck roast for my chili, but not as small as BT. I cut almost 1/2" cubes and brown them well before proceeding.

I make a chili that's thick and has a lot less tomato in it than many recipes. It's not as super simple as Audeo's. I'll have to give it a try.
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Old 07-08-2010, 01:46 PM   #18
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Just some additional comments. No question, that like BBQ, chili is different things to different people and sections of the country.
The kind of chili I do pretty much follows the outline of what would be called 'competition chili' found at cook-offs leading to the World Chili Championship held annually in Terlingua Texas.
So my preference is to always cube the meat, use beef suet, and include beer in the chili and sometimes a shot of tequila.
And LOL, no beans will sully my chili!
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Old 07-08-2010, 03:45 PM   #19
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I love Texas chili. But you really have got to try a Midwest style chili recipe. It'll give you all your daily veggie needs in one bowl, better than a V8 (and you won't have to smack yourself in the forehead).

Myself, I couldn't live on just one style of chili. And yes, for my hot chili entry, I will be cubing beef, though I think I'll use a flavor rich beef heart, coupled with a good chuck roast from our local meat processor (they grow the beef, butcher it, and sell it). I have the added advantage of being able to procure the meat pre-smoked. And since everyone has to use a certified kitchen, probably no one else will have that luxury, as most kitchens that are available belong to places like V.F.W's and Knight's of Columbus Hall, or the Elk's club, etc. They don't have flame broiling/grilling equipment. It pays to know your meats, and your butcher. Now if only my darned knee will heal up in time.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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