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Old 11-28-2017, 06:51 PM   #1
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Ghee instead of butter

Can I substitute ghee for butter in bread recipes that call for “melted” butter? Or do baking recipes need those milk solids? Do you think it would make a difference in the taste or texture? I love using ghee instead of butter for sautés and roux; the smoke point is much higher, and the buttery flavor seems to be so concentrated. Also, ghee has become readily available in my local supermarkets, so I don’t have to labor to make my own. What think you, people?

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Old 11-28-2017, 08:52 PM   #2
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You can sub ghee for melted butter one for one. It's better for roux than butter as it won't burn easily.

Ghee is basically clarified butter. You can easily make it yourself and save a ton.
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Old 11-29-2017, 11:10 AM   #3
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You can sub ghee for melted butter one for one. It's better for roux than butter as it won't burn easily.

Ghee is basically clarified butter. You can easily make it yourself and save a ton.
I’ve tried making clarified butter, it was many years ago, when I was just beginning to learn to cook; maybe that’s why I failed miserably at it and vowed never to make another recipe requiring it! I will try making it again sometime, just like I finally tried Brussels sprouts after a 50 year abstinence. In the meantime, since it’s available at the corner supermarket, and not exorbitantly expensive, I’ll go for the convenience!
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Old 11-29-2017, 11:11 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
You can sub ghee for melted butter one for one. It's better for roux than butter as it won't burn easily.

Ghee is basically clarified butter. You can easily make it yourself and save a ton.
I was wondering about the roux, and whether it needed the milk solids in butter. But then, you can make roux with vegetable oil, so that makes sense. Thanks again.
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Old 11-29-2017, 11:54 AM   #5
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Martha Stewart uses melted butter and ghee as if it is the same thing?

Is clarification the difference?
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Old 11-29-2017, 11:57 AM   #6
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Martha Stewart uses melted butter and ghee as if it is the same thing?

Is clarification the difference?
Butter consists of butter fat, water and milk solids (and sometimes salt). Clarified butter and ghee have had the water and milk solids removed leaving the butter fat. So clarified butter and ghee are essentially the same product. The only difference being that some ghee is heated longer to partially brown to butter fat.
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Old 01-21-2018, 02:50 PM   #7
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I use ghee alot but I will probably use it even more now that you've mentioned it can be used for roux, breads, etc. Thanks!

Around here it really doesn't seem to be that much more expensive than butter.
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Old 01-21-2018, 03:35 PM   #8
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It’s really simple to make.
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Old 01-23-2018, 11:38 AM   #9
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Yes, Andy, I know it is simple to make but I am not a "think and plan ahead" type of person. When I have started a recipe I am not going to stop and make some ghee. So even though I'm a "rather make it from scratch" cook there are certain things I'd rather just buy.
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Old 01-23-2018, 11:46 AM   #10
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Yes, Andy, I know it is simple to make but I am not a "think and plan ahead" type of person. When I have started a recipe I am not going to stop and make some ghee. So even though I'm a "rather make it from scratch" cook there are certain things I'd rather just buy.
I wouldn't expect you to stop in the middle of a recipe to make ghee. However, you could make a pound or two and refrigerate it for whenever. It keeps at least as long as butter.
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Old 01-23-2018, 12:45 PM   #11
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I wouldn't expect you to stop in the middle of a recipe to make ghee. However, you could make a pound or two and refrigerate it for whenever. It keeps at least as long as butter.
Yes, it lasts indefinitely in the fridge.

Or, think of it as part of your mise en place. It takes about the same amount of time to make ghee as it does to chop an onion.
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Old 01-24-2018, 01:28 AM   #12
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I wouldn't expect you to stop in the middle of a recipe to make ghee. However, you could make a pound or two and refrigerate it for whenever. It keeps at least as long as butter.
I don't use it very often, but I do have some in the fridge, and more in the freezer. I got it at COSTCO, and in hindsight, the quantity was WAY too much for me to use in a reasonable time period.

I only use it when I need to use butter, but at a higher heat than butter wants to be used at (pardon the dangling preposition).

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Old 01-24-2018, 09:50 AM   #13
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I only use it when I need to use butter, but at a higher heat than butter wants to be used at
Got your six:

...at a higher heat than that at which butter wants to be used.
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Old 03-14-2018, 06:22 PM   #14
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Butter was on special awhile ago. Snowed-in for the next couple of days so...

.... with Andy and GG's encouragement and although I have made clarified butter and browned butter (that one was a miracle!) it has only been small amounts for a specific recipe.

Yesterday I got brave and made some ghee from a full pound of butter - Whee! Success!

Was always worried that 'homemade' would not last as long but as it seems I am using more all the time I believe I should go thru it at a decent rate.
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Old 03-14-2018, 09:43 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
Butter was on special awhile ago. Snowed-in for the next couple of days so...

.... with Andy and GG's encouragement and although I have made clarified butter and browned butter (that one was a miracle!) it has only been small amounts for a specific recipe.

Yesterday I got brave and made some ghee from a full pound of butter - Whee! Success!

Was always worried that 'homemade' would not last as long but as it seems I am using more all the time I believe I should go thru it at a decent rate.
How did you make your ghee? I make mine in the oven: no fuss!
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Old 03-15-2018, 06:48 AM   #16
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Using an enameled cast iron pot:-
  • Cut butter into chunks - melted over medium Low heat.
  • As soon as it bubbled reduced the heat even further.
  • Skimmed the foam off top maybe about 3 or 4 times.
  • As soon as I saw the simmering bubbles start appearing in large bubbles I took it off the heat.
  • Without disturbing the milk solids, which you could just see on the bottom, drained thru a fine sieve lined with cheese cloth.
  • Divided into 2 jars (one for the neighbour) but left them on the counter, covered with a tea towel, til cooled before putting the lids on.


So how do you do it in the oven? Does it foam? Do you take it out to skim? How do you know when the solids ar on the bottom? How long before the solids might burn?

I sort of like the control the stove top seem to give me. Whole process certainly didn't take very long.

I did google it before starting. Wanted to see if there were different ways to proceed - they were all pretty much identical!
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Old 03-15-2018, 11:31 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
Using an enameled cast iron pot:-
  • Cut butter into chunks - melted over medium Low heat.
  • As soon as it bubbled reduced the heat even further.
  • Skimmed the foam off top maybe about 3 or 4 times.
  • As soon as I saw the simmering bubbles start appearing in large bubbles I took it off the heat.
  • Without disturbing the milk solids, which you could just see on the bottom, drained thru a fine sieve lined with cheese cloth.
  • Divided into 2 jars (one for the neighbour) but left them on the counter, covered with a tea towel, til cooled before putting the lids on.


So how do you do it in the oven? Does it foam? Do you take it out to skim? How do you know when the solids ar on the bottom? How long before the solids might burn?

I sort of like the control the stove top seem to give me. Whole process certainly didn't take very long.

I did google it before starting. Wanted to see if there were different ways to proceed - they were all pretty much identical!
Standing in front of the stove, watching, skimming, adjusting the heat... Way too much trouble. I only put that much effort into roux! The oven takes a lot longer, probably, but it’s virtually effort-free and fool-proof (“fool-proof” is the key word there, for me!)

1 lb of butter in a heavy Dutch oven. Place it in the oven at 250°F, no need to preheat. You can watch it if you want, it’s kind of interesting to see the butter go through it’s changes, but you really don’t have to start checking until about an hour. The milk solids will all separate from the fat, and start to brown and sink to the bottom, and the water will have mostly evaporated (fewer bubbles). Strain it through a cheesecloth (or a cheap men’s hankie, that’s my favorite) and you’ve got ghee!
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Old 03-15-2018, 12:37 PM   #18
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I've been cooking for 50 years and I've probably been aware of ghee and known how to make it for the last 30. I've never found a reason to make it because I like the taste of butter with the milk solids and salt in it. I freeze butter when it goes on sale. 15-20 lbs at a time.

I've cooked for 6 or more, or 3, or rarely 1, and usually 2 or 3. No one here has ever mentioned to me that ghee is a good idea. I do keep bacon grease in the fridge if I need a little to fry something in it. I have serious doubts I'd notice or care if someone cooked with ghee......not that you can't enjoy it, if you really like it.
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Old 03-15-2018, 01:15 PM   #19
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I've been cooking for 50 years and I've probably been aware of ghee and known how to make it for the last 30. I've never found a reason to make it because I like the taste of butter with the milk solids and salt in it. I freeze butter when it goes on sale. 15-20 lbs at a time.

I've cooked for 6 or more, or 3, or rarely 1, and usually 2 or 3. No one here has ever mentioned to me that ghee is a good idea. I do keep bacon grease in the fridge if I need a little to fry something in it. I have serious doubts I'd notice or care if someone cooked with ghee......not that you can't enjoy it, if you really like it.
I made some New Orleans bbq shrimp last night, and I used ghee instead of butter. The result was delightful. Not only did the ghee add a lovely, nutty flavor, but it’s smoking point is much higher than butter, so there was no burned taste to the dish. For that very reason, I find that it’s very useful in sautés and slow cooked sauces. And I love the way the kitchen smells while it’s cooking!
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Old 03-15-2018, 01:34 PM   #20
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Am I a clown, or is ghee nothing more than clarified butter? please clarify my doubts as well! If it's something different, please educate me!

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