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Old 03-17-2018, 10:50 PM   #1
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Beef stock (broth?) is the wrong color

Beef soup bones were on sale today at the supermarket, so I decided Id make some beef broth. I roasted the bones (about 2 lbs) for a couple of hours in a low oven, then added them to the stockpot with a quartered onion, two celery stalks, and a bunch of mushroom stems (I didnt have any carrots, for some reason).

The broth never turns that beautiful golden color that characterizes the base of a French onion soup. Its whitish and milky. There was virtually no scum to skim as I brought it to a boil, and I skimmed some fat about an hour in.

Can anyone tell me why this is, and how to make a beef broth with good color?

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Old 03-18-2018, 04:50 AM   #2
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Did you leave the skin on the onion and did it have dark skin? I usually use bones that have a little meat left on. After roasting the meat will also add color and flavor.
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Old 03-18-2018, 08:12 AM   #3
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How does it taste? When you say "whitish", is it like the color of chicken broth. "Milky" doesn't sound particularly appetizing. Maybe you used too much water making the stock?, otherwise I don't know.

One way to rescue the stock/ make it browner is to use a little browning sauce. Kitchen Bouquet and HP are two common brands. They're both made from vegetables. I would be careful using too much so your stock doesn't come out looking like artificial gravy that some restaurants use to spiiff up and then it looks fake.

I think one way to use it as is, is to make sopa de cebolla, Mexican onion soup. This is usually cooked either as a vegetarian soup or with chicken broth. I think it would great with your current stock situation.
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Old 03-18-2018, 11:27 AM   #4
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This is why I buy it already made. Too much work, for too little return.
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Old 03-18-2018, 11:41 AM   #5
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I make chicken broth almost every time I make chicken, then I freeze it. I have a gallon or so frozen in pint and quart jars. When the freezer gets too full, I boil the broth down until it is super concentrated to save on space.

Anyways, here is a possible answer to the whitish broth versus the more golden colored broth.
https://www.koreanbapsang.com/2013/0...bone-soup.html
Quote:
In making a Western-style beef stock or Vietnamese pho broth, the cooks aim for a clear, brown broth by simmering beef bones for many hours. In contrast, the goal of making seolleongtang is to achieve a milky white broth. Whats done differently? Its the heat level! For a clear broth, the bones are gently simmered over low heat. Simmering, by definition, is cooking at the temperature below the boiling point with bubbles gently rising to the top. For a milky broth, you need to boil moderately, not simmer, throughout the cooking time.
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Old 03-18-2018, 12:17 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
I make chicken broth almost every time I make chicken, then I freeze it. I have a gallon or so frozen in pint and quart jars. When the freezer gets too full, I boil the broth down until it is super concentrated to save on space.

Anyways, here is a possible answer to the whitish broth versus the more golden colored broth.
https://www.koreanbapsang.com/2013/0...bone-soup.html
Hah! That article nailed it! I cooked the broth with too much heat! Thank you!
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Old 03-18-2018, 12:34 PM   #7
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You're welcome.
Though I've never made pho, I always thought it would be such a nice dish to make. And to nail pho, it needs a clear broth and just the right spices and herbs, and well, I haven't made it.
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Old 03-18-2018, 12:36 PM   #8
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Hah! That article nailed it! I cooked the broth with too much heat! Thank you!
Interesting. I've never made beef stock, only chicken stock, and I make it in a pressure cooker. At sea level it cooks at 250 F. The cookbooks have no mention of beef stock turning white if you make it in a pressure cooker.
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Old 03-18-2018, 12:46 PM   #9
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tenspeed, the pressure cooker drives the boiling point up, so it never boils, it remains still.

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Another cool feature: By raising the boiling point, you can be sure that the liquid in your pressure cooker won't boil, even though its contents will be well over 212F (unless you allow it to over-pressurize, in which case the cooker will vent itself and boiling will occur). This stillness inside the cooker means you'll end up with a clear stock, free of the proteins and other gunk that can turn it cloudy once dispersed.
from: https://www.seriouseats.com/2017/04/...ken-stock.html
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Old 03-18-2018, 12:59 PM   #10
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tenspeed, the pressure cooker drives the boiling point up, so it never boils, it remains still.



from: https://www.seriouseats.com/2017/04/...ken-stock.html
That's good to know. I would have thought it would be a function of temperature, but it's the agitation of boiling. I learned something today, so it was worth getting out of bed.


Note to self: Never quick release when making stock.
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Old 03-19-2018, 08:56 AM   #11
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Yes, the agitation of boiling mechanically emulsifies the fat into the water and you will be left with greyish, greasy stock.

You should never boil the water when you make stock. A very gentle simmer is needed.
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Old 03-19-2018, 10:43 AM   #12
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Yes, the agitation of boiling mechanically emulsifies the fat into the water and you will be left with greyish, greasy stock.

You should never boil the water when you make stock. A very gentle simmer is needed.
This seems to be the majority consensus. Gentle simmer only.

In the meantime, my stock might be cloudy, but it’s definitely delicious. I’ll make some ramen with it instead of French onion soup - it looks like a tonkotsu broth, except of course it’s made with beef!
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Old 03-19-2018, 11:24 AM   #13
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soup boiled/over boiled actually.
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Old 03-19-2018, 03:17 PM   #14
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Low & slow is not the way to go! Broil them on high till a little burnt, into a nice carmel color. If it's still too light add Maggie or Kitchen Bouquet for color and added flavor.
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Old 03-19-2018, 06:56 PM   #15
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Low & slow is not the way to go! Broil them on high till a little burnt, into a nice carmel color. If it's still too light add Maggie or Kitchen Bouquet for color and added flavor.
I think you missed what I’m making. And my problem is not in prepping the bones, it’s making a clearer stock. The action of a rolling boil emulsifies the fat and the liquid. So, if you want a clearer broth, you never bring it to a full boil.
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Old 03-19-2018, 07:12 PM   #16
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Ever try the egg trick? When you have strained your broth, put it back in the pot and get it hot again..take two beaten egg whites(until frothy) some add the shells also, and add it into the stock..shell and all..stir it around gently until it cooks and rises to the top..strain your broth again. The idea is that as the egg coagulates it will absorb, or trap, a lot of the solids that are in the broth, and will also continue to further trap more of the solids as you strain it..I have tried it a few times and it has worked to some degree..
http://www.culinaryone.com/how-to-clarify-broth/
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Old 03-20-2018, 10:43 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocklobster View Post
Ever try the egg trick? When you have strained your broth, put it back in the pot and get it hot again..take two beaten egg whites(until frothy) some add the shells also, and add it into the stock..shell and all..stir it around gently until it cooks and rises to the top..strain your broth again. The idea is that as the egg coagulates it will absorb, or trap, a lot of the solids that are in the broth, and will also continue to further trap more of the solids as you strain it..I have tried it a few times and it has worked to some degree..
How To Clarify Broth - Bringing New Clarity to Stock-Making
This works for proteins and solids but wont work for emulsified fat.

Also, one usually uses ground meat as well as egg whites to clarify... tomatoes, too

A greasy stock will always be greasy ...
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Old 03-20-2018, 12:55 PM   #18
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If you would strain it through multiple layers of cheesecloth, might it trap some of the grease? Wouldn't cost much in time or money. Well, not my time or money.
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Old 03-20-2018, 01:41 PM   #19
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If you would strain it through multiple layers of cheesecloth, might it trap some of the grease? Wouldn't cost much in time or money. Well, not my time or money.
It would be like straining a bottle of Italian salad dressing ....

That's the beauty/frustration of emulsification. Its permanent
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Old 03-20-2018, 03:04 PM   #20
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Did I say greasy?

My broth didnt come out greasy, just milky. The flavor and texture are wonderful. I concentrated it down and will use it to make ramen (tonkotsu ramen broth is made from pork bones, but its milky like my beef broth.)
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