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Old 03-15-2010, 11:17 PM   #1
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Depths for Raised Bed Veggie Gardens

is there a Max or Min depth for raised veggie beds?

i realize that certain veggies will have deeper root systems but i was wondering if anyone had information to how deep you need to make your bed...

and a premature Thank You to all that answer...i am an extreme newbie to the gardening life and really am thankful for all the nice people on this site :)

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Old 03-15-2010, 11:21 PM   #2
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Hi Steve

I have had good success with raised beds...usually make them 18 inches deep depending on what is going in. My husband put a shallow ledge around the edge so makes for easy weeding etc. I add organic matter every year and turn them well at the end of the season. I have everything from root veggies to herbs and vine plants. Good luck with that!
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Old 03-16-2010, 04:51 AM   #3
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Mine vary from 8 -12 inches and I grow all the standards from tomatoes and peppers to beets and carrots with no problem.

I built two into the slope of the hill in my back yard and those are 12 inches on one side and 36" on the other. I plant my potatoes in these.

I add compost and manure yearly to the beds and rotate what I plant in the beds.
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Old 03-16-2010, 10:55 AM   #4
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It depends on the type of the soil you will have undernise (how do you spell that?).
I have clay and have to raise it higher. Or you can dig the soil out and fill in with good black dirt + fertilizer of your choice.
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Old 03-16-2010, 06:02 PM   #5
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thanks for the replies :)
as far as original soil, i would say it is just basic soil, not rocky or full of clay.
Chances are i will be using 1x8 untreated pine wood unless someone pops in and highly recommends not using that type of wood.
The project is something that will be used for maybe 5 years at the most, so i don't really wanna spend allot of cash to build it out of cedar or any other highly priced material. It is basically going to be a nice medium sized starter bed until i get the hang of what i need to do in order to produce a good quality product...like i said i am a newbie to all this so i'm trying to avoid jumping in over my head.

i am open to any more suggestions you folks have...
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Old 03-16-2010, 06:35 PM   #6
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I used plain pine for mine and they have lasted for 6 years. Some need replacing and some just need a new board or two and some are still fine. You should be fine if you are looking for only about 5 years. FYI - I painted the outside of my beds.
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Old 03-16-2010, 07:24 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveSoMD View Post
I used plain pine for mine and they have lasted for 6 years. Some need replacing and some just need a new board or two and some are still fine. You should be fine if you are looking for only about 5 years. FYI - I painted the outside of my beds.
by chance did you do any research on painting them and the effects on vegetables?

i only ask cus it would be nice to put an artistic touch on the outside, maybe even give the outsides of the boards a nice stain but i don't want to compromise my safety for looks.
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Old 03-17-2010, 04:51 AM   #8
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No. I just used an exterior latex paint on the outsides of the boards and the top edge. I left the inside where the dirt is plain pine.
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Old 06-21-2011, 10:38 AM   #9
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I use 2x4x4 foot stock tanks (the metal ones) they being 4 foot deep are deep enough for everything, plus I don't have to bend over to weed, plant, harvest, etc. I have 14 of them this year, they cost about $99 each, I bought them over 2 years. This year I added a drip irrigation system for easy and water efficient watering.

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Old 06-21-2011, 11:05 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Barnett
I use 2x4x4 foot stock tanks (the metal ones) they being 4 foot deep are deep enough for everything, plus I don't have to bend over to weed, plant, harvest, etc. I have 14 of them this year, they cost about $99 each, I bought them over 2 years. This year I added a drip irrigation system for easy and water efficient watering.

Robert
What a cool idea, Robert!

I use big plastic self-watering containers from Gardeners Supply.
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Old 06-21-2011, 02:03 PM   #11
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That is a cool idea. And they look nice, but I was wondering if you really needed all that depth for growing, or just to get the dirt up to working level. That's a lot of dirt if you only need half that for growing.
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Old 06-21-2011, 02:12 PM   #12
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For use it was for working hight at the start and then when we saw how big the tomatoes got and how deep the roots went and then when we started carrots and potatoes we really started to appreciate the depth. I don't think it is a waste. Also the soil settles prey quick, it goes from the brim down 6 inches each year.

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Old 06-21-2011, 02:16 PM   #13
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Interesting, thanks.
I guess a good root sytem makes for a strong plant. And all that dirt would hold the moisture longer.
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Old 06-21-2011, 02:35 PM   #14
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That and I just use the tanks included drain which means water doesn't build up but it does't drain out quickly either. Think the have them 2x2x4, 4 long, 2 wide, 2 deep. I would still rather have these that away I know I have the space for anything from carrots and lettuce to potatoes, watermelon, to tomatoes and corn. The can handle them all. Better to buy the containers once and then not have to worry about it. The also have them bigger around, but we wanted something we fouls easily reach across from one side.

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