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Old 11-21-2018, 07:38 PM   #41
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Cilantro originated in the highlands of the lower mid-latitudes, not really the tropics.
India??

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Old 11-21-2018, 11:47 PM   #42
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India??

Russ
Iran, according to Wikipedia.
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Old 11-22-2018, 01:30 AM   #43
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I was thinking more of where is is used, and grown the most, not where it first appeared. Mexico, and other Latin American countries, SE Asia, and India, esp. southern India, it seems to be used a lot, and I know that most of these areas are hotter than NJ!
Like I said, fortunately, that is one thing I don't have to try to grow any more!

I always thought it was strange that cilantro was called Chinese parsley for many years, until cilantro caught on as the name, yet it rarely appears in Chinese food - mostly in a few regions way down south, bordering the SE Asian countries that use it a lot.
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Old 11-22-2018, 10:08 AM   #44
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I was thinking more of where is is used, and grown the most, not where it first appeared. Mexico, and other Latin American countries, SE Asia, and India, esp. southern India, it seems to be used a lot, and I know that most of these areas are hotter than NJ!
Like I said, fortunately, that is one thing I don't have to try to grow any more!

I always thought it was strange that cilantro was called Chinese parsley for many years, until cilantro caught on as the name, yet it rarely appears in Chinese food - mostly in a few regions way down south, bordering the SE Asian countries that use it a lot.
I said that because it grows best in the temperate areas where it originated, not the tropics. In Mexico, it's grown mostly in mountainous areas, where the weather is cooler. I imagine it's the same in southeast Asia, unless they have bred a variety that we don't get in the United States.
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Old 11-22-2018, 11:32 AM   #45
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No, but my friend in California does...
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Old 11-22-2018, 03:31 PM   #46
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Cilantro but we call it coriander here, I also use coriander seeds,a lot.

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Old 11-22-2018, 06:37 PM   #47
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Cilantro but we call it coriander here, I also use coriander seeds,a lot.

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We yanks call the seeds coriander, and the plants cilantro. Don't know why, we just do.

CD
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Old 11-22-2018, 07:07 PM   #48
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We yanks call the seeds coriander, and the plants cilantro. Don't know why, we just do.

CD
Cd, I don't know who's right, but when I'm on a merry can, sites I always try to change it to cilantro. I use both the green leaf and the seeds. I dry roast the seeds for my curry Garam masala.

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Old 11-22-2018, 07:29 PM   #49
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In a lot of my old CBs I saw it referred to as coriander, as well as Chinese parsley. I think the name was dropped because of the seeds - they would have to specify seeds or leaves. In some recipes you could tell by how it was used, but in some, you really didn't know, unless they specified.
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Old 11-22-2018, 08:36 PM   #50
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I've tried to grow cilantro a few times and even in the coldest part of winter here, it bolts or just doesn't do well for one reason or another. Like others have mentioned, it's so inexpensive to buy that I just don't mess with it anymore.
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Old 11-22-2018, 08:42 PM   #51
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I've tried to grow cilantro a few times and even in the coldest part of winter here, it bolts or just doesn't do well for one reason or another. Like others have mentioned, it's so inexpensive to buy that I just don't mess with it anymore.
You are very lucky to get it cilantro cheap as chips.
But here it's quite expensive, that's why I freeze it in the summer. If I'm making a Thai salad it has to be fresh.

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Old 11-22-2018, 09:51 PM   #52
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I tried growing coriander once. It bolted. I did get a batch of seeds. It came back the next year and bolted again. It didn't come back the third year.
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Old 11-25-2018, 04:25 PM   #53
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I can also now grow up to six plants, legally, for personal consumption, in my back yard.
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Old 11-25-2018, 04:48 PM   #54
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I can also now grow up to six plants, legally, for personal consumption, in my back yard.
Care to share your brownie recipe?
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Old 11-25-2018, 04:56 PM   #55
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Care to share your brownie recipe?
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Old 11-27-2018, 12:54 PM   #56
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I've tried to grow cilantro a few times and even in the coldest part of winter here, it bolts or just doesn't do well for one reason or another. Like others have mentioned, it's so inexpensive to buy that I just don't mess with it anymore.

Same here Cheryl. I gave up trying and we use lots of cilantro. Our mile away Mexican market sells it for a quarter a bunch, so that more than solves the problem.
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Old 11-28-2018, 01:14 PM   #57
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Mine also bolts immediately no matter when I plant it.
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Old 11-28-2018, 02:18 PM   #58
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But of course!

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Old 11-28-2018, 03:06 PM   #59
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But of course!
Seedless?
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