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Old 07-12-2013, 06:47 PM   #1
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Turnips

Can anyone give advise on how to prepare turnips?

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Old 07-12-2013, 10:12 PM   #2
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Sure. Peel, cut into chunks, put in boiling water till tender when pierced by a fork. Drain. Mash the heck out of them with a potato masher. While mashing, add salt, butter, maybe a bit of sugar, white or brown, your choice, or not. More butter.

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Old 07-13-2013, 12:26 AM   #3
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This may or may not be helpful, depending on the gear you have! The best turnips I've ever tasted were ones I cooked sous vide. Just slice them about 1/2" thick and bag them with butter, salt and pepper. Seal and cook them for 50 minutes at 185 F.
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Old 07-13-2013, 12:55 AM   #4
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I like adding cut up chunks to my beef stew or vegetable beef soup.
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Old 07-13-2013, 06:40 AM   #5
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I like turnips boiled with greens and some bacon grease in the water. 'Course, I like turnips any way they are prepared.
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Old 07-13-2013, 06:49 AM   #6
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I like them in Cornish Pasties. Wherever it says "Rutabaga" in the recipe, just replace with the word "Turnip". The flavor is very similar.

Turnips are also great in beef stew.
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Old 07-13-2013, 07:00 AM   #7
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Mashed turnips were always part of our Thanksgiving dinner.

We also tossed a few chunks into a pot roast with the other vegetables.

Might as well cover all the bases and finish dinner with this!

Candied Turnip | Tasty Kitchen: A Happy Recipe Community!
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Old 07-14-2013, 05:09 PM   #8
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My wife found a slaw recipe in her search. Thanks for your replies.
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Old 10-29-2014, 08:30 PM   #9
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Mashed turnips were always part of our Thanksgiving dinner.
I have never heard of mashed turnips, is this something that is common for Thanksgiving dinner? I personally have only had turnips in soup, but even then it was a rare occurrence.
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Old 10-29-2014, 09:26 PM   #10
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Mashed turnips were always part of our Thanksgiving dinner.
Same here. Better than potatoes, as far as I'm concerned.
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Old 10-29-2014, 09:38 PM   #11
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Same here. Better than potatoes, as far as I'm concerned.

Agree. I haven't had them in years, I'll have to get some again.
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Old 10-30-2014, 05:04 AM   #12
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Cut into chunks and cook as advised above, drain and leave aside. Melt knob of butter
and similar amount of brown sugar until starting to bubble. Take off heat and fold in the drained turnips. Serve with a contrasting veg such as greens, spinach.
If mashing them with butter ( more butter, right on dawglover ) and black pepper, whisk in an egg. Believe me, it works, they are like velvet
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Old 10-30-2014, 05:22 AM   #13
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I like them in beef stew and pot roast. Haven't tried them mashed.
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Old 10-30-2014, 05:37 AM   #14
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It is common in the central New York state area where I grew up.

Thanksgiving was a harvest celebration, the farmers ate what they grew! My Father and my Grandmother used to enjoy looking around the table and pointing out all of the things that had grown in our garden. These days I look around the table and am thankful that I still have the strength, not to mention the money, to get everything home from the supermarket!

If the strong taste or texture of mashed turnips puts you off then add a couple if Irish potatoes to the pot and mash them together. I myself enjoy the mashed turnip with butter, salt and freshly ground black pepper.

I need to try whisking an egg into the finished product!

Also someone on this board gave me a tip about peeling the wax covered rutabagas. Cut the rutabaga in half then into approximately one inch slices, use a paring knife to peel the wax off of each slice. This is much easier and much safer for me than trying to peel the whole turnip!
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Old 10-30-2014, 06:24 AM   #15
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It is common in the central New York state area where I grew up.

Thanksgiving was a harvest celebration, the farmers ate what they grew! My Father and my Grandmother used to enjoy looking around the table and pointing out all of the things that had grown in our garden. These days I look around the table and am thankful that I still have the strength, not to mention the money, to get everything home from the supermarket!

If the strong taste or texture of mashed turnips puts you off then add a couple if Irish potatoes to the pot and mash them together. I myself enjoy the mashed turnip with butter, salt and freshly ground black pepper.

I need to try whisking an egg into the finished product!

Also someone on this board gave me a tip about peeling the wax covered rutabagas. Cut the rutabaga in half then into approximately one inch slices, use a paring knife to peel the wax off of each slice. This is much easier and much safer for me than trying to peel the whole turnip!
I learned to peel them like that also. I cut mine from pole to pole like you would with an onion. Then you can cut each half into slices. The prep work on them goes so fast that way. I also learned that directly underneath the peeling, there is a very thin light strip. This strip is bitter and should be removed with the peeling. All you are left with is a sweet tasting veggie.
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Old 10-30-2014, 09:30 AM   #16
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The big yellow turnips that we always mashed are often called rutabagas in other parts of the country or swedes in other parts of the world.

We never mashed the white turnips. Are ya'll referring to the same thing, or did you mash white turnips?
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Old 10-30-2014, 09:48 AM   #17
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...If the strong taste or texture of mashed turnips puts you off then add a couple if Irish potatoes to the pot...

What is an Irish potato?
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Old 10-30-2014, 09:50 AM   #18
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The big yellow turnips that we always mashed are often called rutabagas in other parts of the country or swedes in other parts of the world.

We never mashed the white turnips. Are ya'll referring to the same thing, or did you mash white turnips?
We always mashed white and purple turnips, using the same method as with potatoes. Cut into large dice, boil, drain, and mash.

Rutabagas/swedes are actually not true turnips, but a cross between turnips and cabbages. We used to have those mashed as well.
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Old 10-30-2014, 10:08 AM   #19
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What is an Irish potato?
The family of potatoes

One night, the Potato family sat down to dinner--Mother Potato and her three daughters. Midway through the meal, the eldest daughter spoke up. "Mother Potato?" she said. "I have an announcement to make."

"And what might that be?" said Mother, seeing the obvious excitement in her eldest daughter's eyes.

"Well," replied the daughter, with a proud but sheepish grin, "I'm getting married!"

The other daughters squealed with surprise as Mother Potato exclaimed, "Married! That's wonderful! And who are you marrying, Eldest daughter?"

"I'm marrying a Russet!"

"A Russet!" replied Mother Potato with pride.

"Oh, a Russet is a fine tater, a fine tater indeed!"

As the family shared in the eldest daughter's joy, the middle daughter spoke up. "Mother? I, too, have an announcement."

"And what might that be?" encouraged Mother Potato.

Not knowing quite how to begin, the middle daughter paused, then said with conviction, "I, too, am getting married!"

"You, too!" Mother Potato said with joy. "That's wonderful! Twice the good news in one evening! And who are you marrying, Middle Daughter?"

"I'm marrying an Idaho!" beamed the middle daughter.

"An Idaho!" said Mother Potato with joy. "Oh, an Idaho is a fine tater, a fine tater indeed!"

Once again, the room came alive with laughter and excited plan for the future, when the youngest Potato daughter interrupted. "Mother? Mother Potato? Um, I, too, have an announcement to make."

"Yes?" said Mother Potato with great anticipation.

"Well," began the youngest Potato daughter with the same sheepish grin as her eldest sister before her, "I hope this doesn't come as a shock to you, but I am getting married, as well!"

"Really?" said Mother Potato with sincere excitement. "All of my lovely daughters married! What wonderful news! And who, pray tell, are you marrying, Youngest Daughter?"

"I'm marrying Peter Jennings!"

"Peter Jennings?!" Mother Potato scowled suddenly. "But he's just a common tater!"

To make a long story short, an Irish potato is just a common tater!
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Old 10-30-2014, 11:29 AM   #20
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...To make a long story short, an Irish potato is just a common tater!

Such as an all-purpose white potato??
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