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Old 02-18-2020, 02:52 PM   #1
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What are your 2020 garden plans?

My wife is taking point this year on designing the layout, but similar plants to last year. Lots of tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchini, onion, garlic, lettuce, Kale, herbs.

I'm going to be installing a drip irrigation system for our 8 raised beds, both for convenience and also to reduce mildew growth from watering from above.

I am growing some different hot pepper varieties this year:
Trinidad Scorpion Moruga Satan Strain
7-Pot Brain Strain X Carolina Reaper
7-Pot Atlantic Yellow
APS Ghost Pepper Orange
Chocolate Long Pepper Seeds
Brazilian Reaper
Apocalypse Scorpion
Habenero
Jalaneno
Banana
Poblano

My hops will be 2nd year as well, so should get a good harvest from them.

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Old 02-18-2020, 03:13 PM   #2
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I'm seriously thinking of growing potatoes in a garbage bag this year. Other than that, there will probably be a few herbs in pots.
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Old 02-18-2020, 06:02 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenEnvy22 View Post
My wife is taking point this year on designing the layout, but similar plants to last year. Lots of tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchini, onion, garlic, lettuce, Kale, herbs.

I'm going to be installing a drip irrigation system for our 8 raised beds, both for convenience and also to reduce mildew growth from watering from above.

I am growing some different hot pepper varieties this year:
Trinidad Scorpion Moruga Satan Strain
7-Pot Brain Strain X Carolina Reaper
7-Pot Atlantic Yellow
APS Ghost Pepper Orange
Chocolate Long Pepper Seeds
Brazilian Reaper
Apocalypse Scorpion
Habenero
Jalaneno
Banana
Poblano

My hops will be 2nd year as well, so should get a good harvest from them.
I would like to hear more about your drip irrigation system as to brand, etc.

For me, the big change is that I will have a second community garden plot to tend this year. In other words, I'll have two plots plus 16 4x10 beds. The new plot will be a lot of work initially because it's overgrown with grass/weeds. I hope I'm up to the task.

I'm looking forward to harvesting my own strawberries this year (4 beds) and golden raspberries. Previously, I harvested from the community garden area.

I also have asparagus, garlic, shallots, potato onions already planted.

Will plant the usual tomatoes, eggplants, peppers (sweet & hot), onions, squash, edamame, potatoes, broccoli, spinach, beans, & carrots.
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Old 02-18-2020, 07:20 PM   #4
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I've got my seed. Don't have that much room around my house so I go out on the back county roads and plant small patches.

Serrano Peppers

Scallions

National Pickling Cucumbers

Basil, Bay, Sage, Dill, Parsley, Cilantro, Thyme, Garlic.

If I could find a deal on fruit trees, I'd set some out in the back woods
such as Apple (Galia), Pear (Kieffer....blight resistant)

And I have Impatient seed for my porch boxes that ride on the railing.
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Old 02-18-2020, 07:25 PM   #5
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I'm planning on building it mostly from no-name parts.
I will use some generic half in distribution tubing that will run from the tap over 2 the edge of each bed. You can see in the picture below how are beds are arranged, we basically have that times two. So there will be 1/2 inch line running along the back side of each row, and then along that distribution line, I will have 1/4 inch or 1/8 inch tubing coming off.
Along those smaller tubes I will just press in the drippers or mini sprayers.
I'll have a y connector with independent on-off switches to go to the two halves, as I'm not sure I have enough water pressure to do everything all at once.

I spec'd everything out on Amazon, and it will cost me about $150 Canadian to build this. that's buying more than I need of some things, but that will give us spares for future years or repairs.
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Old 02-19-2020, 05:38 PM   #6
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I'm hoping to get around to some of the stuff I resolved to do in 2018.
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Old 02-19-2020, 06:35 PM   #7
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Hoping to get some decent peaches & plumbs this year. The heat last year
just dried them in place on the trees.

I got out there today as it was pleasant and set fertilizer spikes around my trees and then sprayed them with volck oil and lime sulphur. These dormant season spray's stop certain types of insect and fungus problems before the growing season.
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Old 02-19-2020, 06:39 PM   #8
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So far, I've started my cold weather crops, but earlier than normal, because of the very warm weather here!
Here is that tray of early crops I started - two lettuce varieties, 2 kohlrabi, some Fioretto cauliflower, a cauliflower mix(which are the only seeds that didn't germinate well), red bor kale, red dragon napa (the largest of all, by far!), red streaked mizuna, bok choy, and senposai. Oh, I almost forgot - leeks. Probably something else I forgot!
Earliest started cold weather crops. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

A few of these I may put in my hydroponics, where I have some empty pots, but most will be under cover outside, to start.

I'll post the rest later. So far, I have 26 varieties of tomato seeds, and only 20 peppers! lol
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Old 02-19-2020, 09:34 PM   #9
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With the warm weather and lack of snow I've been able to get the garden cleaned up and ready to go for when the risk of frost is no longer present . I ve already received my seed order. Got a few cold frames up and ready to go. Kale , arugula and some chard still alive and pickable. I got 2 cabbages from last fall under a row cover and doing well ( kinda in hibernation mode). Still won't start any tomato seeds indoors til April.
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Old 02-20-2020, 04:08 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I'm seriously thinking of growing potatoes in a garbage bag this year. Other than that, there will probably be a few herbs in pots.
we grew potatoes in a raised bed last year ...


tell me more about this garbage bag situation …..
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Old 02-20-2020, 06:56 PM   #11
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Quote:
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we grew potatoes in a raised bed last year ...


tell me more about this garbage bag situation …..
Bolas mentioned it here years ago. He and his brother, Harry, both grew potatoes in "bin bags". You put soil in the bag and plant the potatoes. You can cut hand sized holes in the sides of the bag to harvest. I have never tried this, so I don't know how well it works. The dark bag is supposed to help the soil get warm earlier in spring than in the ground or in a pot. I was thinking I might combine it with the method where there are only a few inches of soil at the bottom and you pile straw as the plant grows.
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Old 02-20-2020, 07:03 PM   #12
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For me personally, Ive tried potatoes in bags, towers, on top of the ground covered in mulch, in hay bales and conventional.

Ive always had best luck with conventional ( in the ground about 6 - 8 inches deep about 1 foot apart, heavily mulched.

With the extra seed potatoes ( I always buy too much), I put 2 or three in large well drained pots ( about 5 - 10 Galons). Usually in mid to late July, each week I just dump another bucket for my weekley supply of potatoes. When im done with the pots ( which is a few months) Ill start to harvest the conventional beds.
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Old 02-21-2020, 11:49 AM   #13
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tomatoes, for the first time!
Herbs.


Flowers but I'm not sure which ones yet.
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Old 02-21-2020, 12:40 PM   #14
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Pretty much the same as past years - leeks are already in, onions and carrots this weekend; for spring, string beans, peas, cilantro and dill; for summer, grape, Roma and some kind of slicing tomato; bell, poblano and jalapeño peppers; tomatillos; cucumbers; basil.

I keep my mint in a strawberry jar on the patio. I think it needs to be cleaned out and refreshed this year. Woody herbs are perennials here, so I have plenty of bay, rosemary, sage and thyme. I also have flat-leaf parsley that constantly reseeds itself.

I'll also see if there's anything new and interesting at the plant sales. My master gardener group has an early-bird sale in mid-August and another one at our Open Garden event in May.
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Old 02-22-2020, 01:22 AM   #15
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Here's the list of tomatoes and peppers I have, though I am not sure if I will plant all of them, especially the tomatoes. I got a bunch of those new tomato seeds from a friend in FL, who obviously has more heat issues than I do here! However, many, though bred for heat resistance, are determinate (D), which is not something I usually grow.
NEW

Anahu D
Daifuku D
Healani D
Kewala D
Marian ID
Matina ID
Mo Cross Elain #9 D
Mountaineer Pride ID
Peachy Keen D
Prime Rib Lg Dk ID
Raspberry Mochi Lg Dk ID
Yellow Pear ID
Juliet F1 ID
Amish Gold Slicer ID- supposedly larger than the regular variety


OLD

Amish Gold Slicer - regular
Beefy Boy?
Big Beef
Cherry Bomb?
San Marzano
Sunsugar

With the peppers, I decided to downsize, since I had an excess of most of the varieties, even where I just had two plants. I just hate to grow just one of my favorite varieties, since something might happen, and my only plant is gone! But I am going to take that chance. And I have a lot of aji peppers because I stopped growing them years ago, since they were some of the most prone to pepper maggots, but now I can deal with that by covering them, so I don't have to worry about it. Last season I only had one new variety, which didn't work out, so they were all these OLD varieties.

NEW 2020

Aji Amarillo
Aji Colorado
Aji Mango
Aji Melocoton
Aji Panca
Aji Pineapple
Byadagi
Meteor Pepper
Pepperdew

OLD

Aji Dulce
Aleppo
Big Jim Numex
Chocolate Habanero
Hanoi Market
Jalafuego
Jyoti
Masquetero Ancho
Superchili
Thai Vesuvius

I also have some new gourds - a Tinda gourd (always looking for subs for summer squash, which I can't grow, due to SVB), and that White Okinawan bitter melon, from Baker Creek.
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Old 04-02-2020, 07:53 PM   #16
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We got off to a bad start. We went to South America at the beginning of March and had someone looking after our seedlings. Well they all died, so started them over when we got back.

The garden itself is just about done, got all the soil tilled today and started installing the drip irrigation. We put in some of the cold hardy stuff like lettuce, radishes, and a few others. We'll probably still have a few frosts this month.

We setup one of our old security cameras overlooking the garden. My plan is to do a timelapse of the whole growing season, 1 or 2 photos a day, which I'll blend into a video or gif in the fall.
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Old 04-02-2020, 08:10 PM   #17
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Looking good.
Ive got some stuff under some cold frames ( lettuce, greens, radishes ..) which, to my surprise are doing better than usual.

This week will be a big week. Potatoes and onions going in. Also planting some strawberries to fill out my thinning patch.

In addition, I hope to get beets, carrots and spinach in as well ( seeds).

Peas are about 5 - 6 " high

And last years kale and arugula is still kicking.

I like the daly picture/ time lapse idea. I may try and do it myself.
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Old 04-02-2020, 08:12 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenEnvy22 View Post
We got off to a bad start. We went to South America at the beginning of March and had someone looking after our seedlings. Well they all died, so started them over when we got back.

The garden itself is just about done, got all the soil tilled today and started installing the drip irrigation. We put in some of the cold hardy stuff like lettuce, radishes, and a few others. We'll probably still have a few frosts this month.

We setup one of our old security cameras overlooking the garden. My plan is to do a timelapse of the whole growing season, 1 or 2 photos a day, which I'll blend into a video or gif in the fall.
I don't really know much about time lapse photography, but if you have a 120 day growing season and you take two photos per day, that only gives you 240 photos. At 24 frames per second, that will only give you a 10 second video. I'm sure you can make it slower than 24 FPS, but it's still going to be really short.
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Old 04-02-2020, 09:00 PM   #19
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I got a few peppers started a little early, as well as my eggplant seeds, since they are slow. All the rest of my pepper and tomato seeds started yesterday, the usual date I start most of them. Another month, and it should be time to put tomatoes in the ground!
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Old 04-02-2020, 09:10 PM   #20
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I also usually use April 1 as my tomato start date. I actually started a week earlier cause I wanted to test the germination of some seeds ive had for awhile. Got 100% germination rate so now I just have to keep them from getting leggy. Ill start the rest this weekend.

Also looking forward to uncovering my figs, curious too see how they held up in this mild winter. Im hoping for a good fig harvest this year.
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