"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-23-2012, 09:31 PM   #1
The Dude Abides
 
TATTRAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bermuda Native in D.C./NoVA
Posts: 5,476
Send a message via AIM to TATTRAT Send a message via Yahoo to TATTRAT Send a message via Skype™ to TATTRAT
"Boiled Dinner," TATTRAT Style

I put this in here, because you can do this with ANY sausage you have, be it this style of leftover Hill-shire Farm stuff, or proper, nice, homemade artisan sausage. . . Do it with thick ham steaks too, nice and hearty.


So, there are many takes on a "Boiled dinner". I like 'em because you can just set it, and forget it. It's like a crock pot but a little more finesse, and it doesn't take 6 hours.

This is a "Gotta Go 3 Meat Boil". . . I had Kielbasa, Smoked Beef Sausage, and Some Southern Turkey Sausage(all Hillshire farms ****, nothing special, I get my groceries delivered to the house so I am lucky to get anything). This also works GREAT with thick cut ham steaks(that was what I wanted to do, but they were out of stock).

What you will need:
Sausages/Smoked meat, Cabbage, Onion, Carrot, Stock(Chicken and beef, please note the 3 cubes of beef bullion as I didn't have canned beef stock available), Garlic, herbs of your choice, I prefer fresh thyme as it's light and floral, cuts through the richness of the meat, but isn't strong or overpowering, like rosemary can be. In addition to the FRESH ONION, and FRESH GARLIC, also use onion powder, and granulated garlic. Crushed Red Pepper, butter, Olive oil canola blend(you don't need a lot) AND SALT AND PEPPER FOR CHRIST SAKE. Bread. The crustier, supple interior, fragrant bread: A good hunk of Sourdough, or some Baguette, just something.

For a cooking vessel: I use a medium sized stock pot, or, as your Mom would call it, a Soup Pot.

Firstly, is the prep:
-Sausage: I like to leave in about 3-4inch sections, on the bias cut(just for eye appeal).
-Potatoes:These are Yukon golds, they hold up better, and don't break down like a russet. Cut into 6ths, like nice wedges.
-Carrots: Peel, and slice into medium sized batons, or of they are small carrots, just 3inch sections, with a bias cut.
-Onion: Peel, and cut into wedges, not too unlike the potatoes
-Cabbage: If you like it, use the whole head, if not use half, it cooks down and just takes on the flavor of all the other stuff. I used HALF a head, cut into medium sized wedges

Ready to go:




The DRY Goods



The Pot:



FIRSTLY, heat that jammy up, not ripping crazy hot, but hot, You are gonna be going in with a lot of ingredients, so it's better to start with it hot so the re-coup time to bring back up to temp isn't that bad.

ADD 2T of Oil, and 2T of Butter. The butter should foam almost instantly, and you want it to get a little browned around the edges, the toasty milk solids in the butter help add richness to the broth. Remember, more Color, More better when building a broth/stock/sauce.



NOW, ON TO ZEE COOOOOOKINGGGGGGGGGGGG!

First to the party, Onion, and garlic, let em go until they start getting some color on them, again, more color, more flavor. SALT, AND PEPPER YOUR ONIONS, they don't season themselves, and the salt will help draw out moisture so that things brown a little quicker.



Don't burn em, but let em go, they aren't delicate flowers, and the heat will break up the chunks as it breaks them down. . .

Once you get some color on them, time for the dry goods; Add some Onion powder, granulated garlic, your bullion cubes(if you are using liquid broth, hold off), and crushed red pepper. Give them all a stir to get things distributed.


__________________
flickr

@JONOBRANDS
TATTRAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2012, 09:32 PM   #2
The Dude Abides
 
TATTRAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bermuda Native in D.C./NoVA
Posts: 5,476
Send a message via AIM to TATTRAT Send a message via Yahoo to TATTRAT Send a message via Skype™ to TATTRAT
Part II

NOW, IN WITH ZEE MEATS! Add the sausage, all of it. Let that cook for a bit, so that some of it's fats render out, and help to coat the onions, and fond that you are building to make that lovely broth. . .



Once you have let this meat and onion/garlic party mingle for a bit, look for the sausage to plump a little, it's time to add the salad part: fresh herbs(thyme),cabbage, carrots, and potato.



Mix thoroughly, let everyone in the party mingle, and get to know one another. You can get a little color on the bottom, and stir it to the top, just do this for a little bit(like 8min or so). . .THEN, they get their drink on!

At this point, in addition to the stock, you can add Guinness, Harp, any kind of strong stout, ot porter, but don't go overboard. For this one, We are going straight up stock. NOTE: The Swanson stock is pretty pale, and the little Beef Bullion cubes aren't like ink(they aren't that strong), but wait to see the color:



That color is coming from the layers you are building on the bottom of the pan, built up on the onions, and everything else you gave a little patience to. The big fancy culinary term is: Deglazing

Now is the time where we wait. . . drink a beer, get on to drag, fool around with your girl(just wash your hands please before returning to cooking). . .

Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cover



Now, you will know when it's done when the whole house smells like a magical meal is happening. You need to make sure the potatoes are still al dente, have NOT turned to mush, and that the cabbage(the thicker parts) still have a little bite to them. The sausage, you will know it is done, because it will LOOK done.



- Now, for service, you can just bowl it up like a hearty soup, add a knob of butter to have it melt on top, and just be happy with that. It's great, simple, and delicious.

For this presentation, I took some of the pot liquor, put it in a smaller sauce pan, reduced it(here again, you can hit it with a little Brew(if you left it out of the first chance), Whiskey makes a nice touch, red wine, or just let it reduce. Once it comes down by half, take the pan OFF the heat and whisk in 1T of cold butter, this is another French culinary term, burre monté. .. you are finishing it with butter without it breaking. It's important to KEEP IT MOVING UNTIL IT IS MELTED INTO THE SAUCE.

I laid down some of the Potatoes, laid in some carrots, some cabbage in the middle, and piled a portion of the sausages(1 of each), and spooned the reduction around. You can see the color change in the finished sauce, it is because of that WONDERFUL DAMNED BUTTER. Makes things sumptuious, and stick to your ribs.

If you have GREAT BREAD, if you just served it in the bowl a la soup, a hunk will do just fine. For this, my good bread was ****(moldy), so I made soldiers(toast points) to lay across. A little something green for garnish, and you are good.

__________________
flickr

@JONOBRANDS
TATTRAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2012, 09:36 PM   #3
Master Chef
 
Rocklobster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Ottawa Valley, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 6,670
That looks wicked! One thing I have yet to do. Will remedy that in a few days. Thanks for posting....
Rocklobster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2012, 09:47 PM   #4
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 49,234
Looks hearty and delicious!
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2012, 09:53 PM   #5
The Dude Abides
 
TATTRAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bermuda Native in D.C./NoVA
Posts: 5,476
Send a message via AIM to TATTRAT Send a message via Yahoo to TATTRAT Send a message via Skype™ to TATTRAT
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Looks hearty and delicious!
either left brothy, and in a bowl, or, like I did here, with the pot liquor reduced down and finished with butter, it is a stick to your ribs meal.


With the air getting a bit crisper, the first leaves hitting the ground, football on the TV, THIS is the food I crave and think of during this type of year.

Since I have been out of work on medical, but am now on my feet a little since surgery, I am going to try to do 2 dinners this wee, I'll let ya know how it goes. I will say, if the weather stays like it is, it will be some sort of low and slow type "comfort" food. I have found that I REALLY ENJOY building, prepping, composing and cooking since I have been away from work for 5 weeks, it's like therapy to me, and I have enjoyed just thinking of what to do next.

Thanks RL, and Andy for the feedback!
__________________
flickr

@JONOBRANDS
TATTRAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2012, 09:55 PM   #6
The Dude Abides
 
TATTRAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bermuda Native in D.C./NoVA
Posts: 5,476
Send a message via AIM to TATTRAT Send a message via Yahoo to TATTRAT Send a message via Skype™ to TATTRAT
OH S****, it won't let me edit my OP, but, I am not talking to everyone on a cooking board like they are idiots, I shared this first on an automotive forum I frequent, and some of those guys can't make ice, so I had to put things in terms everyone could understand, while doing a little educating so they can impress their ladyfriends with fancy culinary words.
__________________
flickr

@JONOBRANDS
TATTRAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2012, 10:01 PM   #7
Half Baked
 
4meandthem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Bay Area California
Posts: 2,018
Looks great! Wanting Smell-O-Vision!
__________________
Just be yourself! Everyone else is taken.

My Flickr stuff!
https://www.flickr.com/photos/e_maxwell_photography/
4meandthem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2012, 10:10 PM   #8
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 39,013
I need to make this soon...thanks. Hmm...ham hocks in the freezer.
__________________
“There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.” - Albert Einstein
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2012, 10:59 PM   #9
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 28,038
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4meandthem View Post
Looks great! Wanting Smell-O-Vision!
+1
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2012, 11:06 PM   #10
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 6,345
That does look tasty!
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2012, 03:39 AM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 13,466
Quote:
Originally Posted by TATTRAT View Post
OH S****, it won't let me edit my OP, but, I am not talking to everyone on a cooking board like they are idiots, I shared this first on an automotive forum I frequent, and some of those guys can't make ice, so I had to put things in terms everyone could understand, while doing a little educating so they can impress their ladyfriends with fancy culinary words.
Looks great, Tattrat. I missed your recipe re: how to make ice...
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
https://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2012, 03:58 AM   #12
Flour Child
 
mollyanne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: North Carolina, USA
Posts: 1,392
What an amazing recipe tutorial...awesome step-by-step photos. You had me at the sauteed onions and garlic! It's good to hear you're back on your feet after surgery. Take care
__________________


My kitchen is for dancing. Bring me sunshine in a cup. ~emily dickinson.
mollyanne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2012, 05:19 AM   #13
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 22,365
It has been snowing all day. You are exhausted from shoveling. Come in the back door stomping all the snow off and take off your outer clothing. Then with a nice loaf of artisian bread, you break off a big piece, and sop up the liquor. The rest of meal you inhale. Now you go back for seconds. Time to sit down and watch your favorite TV show or just sit and listen to your favorite music. The perfect end to a very busy day. And you hope it doesn't snow tomorrow.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2012, 10:00 AM   #14
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: va by way of upstate ny
Posts: 4,428
i just love a good new england boiled dinner, tat, and yours looks extra-fine! i wanna be in your class, teach.... :)
vitauta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2012, 01:20 PM   #15
Head Chef
 
tinlizzie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 2,008
This morning in the meat aisle they had wrapped packages of various cuts of smoked turkey, which seems like it might be a nice addition to the pot (not that it needs a thing!). I've never bought any smoked turkey. What parts might you recommend - between, say, necks or legs, which they had sawed up into several pieces. Any suggestions, Tattrat?

I enjoyed your blow-by-blow photos and commentary and think how valuable they would be to a beginner cook.
__________________
No matter how simple it seems, it's complicated.
tinlizzie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 09:19 AM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 22,365
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinlizzie View Post
This morning in the meat aisle they had wrapped packages of various cuts of smoked turkey, which seems like it might be a nice addition to the pot (not that it needs a thing!). I've never bought any smoked turkey. What parts might you recommend - between, say, necks or legs, which they had sawed up into several pieces. Any suggestions, Tattrat?

I enjoyed your blow-by-blow photos and commentary and think how valuable they would be to a beginner cook.
If they are all the same 'by the pound' price, then I would go with the legs. More meat. The neck meat is more tender, but a lot of work picking it out. And since it is mostly bone, you are paying a premium price for bone that only flavors the broth, and then tossed out. There is more than enough meat and veggies flavoring the broth. Do you really need to add more bones? I would go for the leg. More bang for your buck.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 12:29 PM   #17
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Florida
Posts: 2,417
Brings back memories of a dish my mom used to make. Very similar, but she never put any kind of alcohol in it. I'm gonna try your version.
__________________
I can resist anything, but temptation. Oscar Wilde
lyndalou is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 01:58 PM   #18
The Dude Abides
 
TATTRAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bermuda Native in D.C./NoVA
Posts: 5,476
Send a message via AIM to TATTRAT Send a message via Yahoo to TATTRAT Send a message via Skype™ to TATTRAT
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinlizzie View Post
This morning in the meat aisle they had wrapped packages of various cuts of smoked turkey, which seems like it might be a nice addition to the pot (not that it needs a thing!). I've never bought any smoked turkey. What parts might you recommend - between, say, necks or legs, which they had sawed up into several pieces. Any suggestions, Tattrat?

I enjoyed your blow-by-blow photos and commentary and think how valuable they would be to a beginner cook.
Thanks.

Smoked turkey would be great, especially for building the broth.

I know some folks are put off by certain things, but I have NO issues with nibbling on a turkey neck! Legs, and thighs have that same rich flavor(I just prefer dark meant, and don't know a Chef who would choose a breast over dark meant).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
If they are all the same 'by the pound' price, then I would go with the legs. More meat. The neck meat is more tender, but a lot of work picking it out. And since it is mostly bone, you are paying a premium price for bone that only flavors the broth, and then tossed out. There is more than enough meat and veggies flavoring the broth. Do you really need to add more bones? I would go for the leg. More bang for your buck.
Yup. That's buying smart. More meat, is certainly more value.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lyndalou View Post
Brings back memories of a dish my mom used to make. Very similar, but she never put any kind of alcohol in it. I'm gonna try your version.
The booze is Purely optional, as said. the last plate I made of it, I used added some Guinness, and a splash of makers mark to reduce, then the broth, and it was like I could feel my beard growing, and a flannel shirt appeared on me. .. and I had a craving for things like shotguns, and a coon skin cap. It was wonderful, rich, manly and Delicious.
__________________
flickr

@JONOBRANDS
TATTRAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2012, 02:51 AM   #19
Master Chef
 
Snip 13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Brakpan, South Africa
Posts: 5,586
That looks delicious!
__________________
Odette
"I used to jog but the ice cubes kept falling out of my glass."

"I hear voices and they don't like you "
Snip 13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
recipe, sausage, dinner

"Boiled Dinner," TATTRAT Style I put this in here, because you can do this with ANY sausage you have, be it this style of leftover Hill-shire Farm stuff, or proper, nice, homemade artisan sausage. . . Do it with thick ham steaks too, nice and hearty. So, there are many takes on a "Boiled dinner". I like 'em because you can just set it, and forget it. It's like a crock pot but a little more finesse, and it doesn't take 6 hours. This is a "Gotta Go 3 Meat Boil". . . I had Kielbasa, Smoked Beef Sausage, and Some Southern Turkey Sausage(all Hillshire farms ****, nothing special, I get my groceries delivered to the house so I am lucky to get anything). This also works GREAT with thick cut ham steaks(that was what I wanted to do, but they were out of stock). [B]What you will need:[/B] Sausages/Smoked meat, Cabbage, Onion, Carrot, Stock(Chicken and beef, please note the 3 cubes of beef bullion as I didn't have canned beef stock available), Garlic, herbs of your choice, I prefer fresh thyme as it's light and floral, cuts through the richness of the meat, but isn't strong or overpowering, like rosemary can be. In addition to the FRESH ONION, and FRESH GARLIC, also use onion powder, and granulated garlic. Crushed Red Pepper, butter, Olive oil canola blend(you don't need a lot) AND SALT AND PEPPER FOR CHRIST SAKE. Bread. The crustier, supple interior, fragrant bread: A good hunk of Sourdough, or some Baguette, just something. [B]For a cooking vessel:[/B] I use a medium sized stock pot, or, as your Mom would call it, a Soup Pot. [B]Firstly, is the prep:[/B] -Sausage: I like to leave in about 3-4inch sections, on the bias cut(just for eye appeal). -Potatoes:These are Yukon golds, they hold up better, and don't break down like a russet. Cut into 6ths, like nice wedges. -Carrots: Peel, and slice into medium sized batons, or of they are small carrots, just 3inch sections, with a bias cut. -Onion: Peel, and cut into wedges, not too unlike the potatoes -Cabbage: If you like it, use the whole head, if not use half, it cooks down and just takes on the flavor of all the other stuff. I used HALF a head, cut into medium sized wedges [B]Ready to go:[/B] [IMG]https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8322/8002094863_fd9704f2fa_c.jpg[/IMG] [B]The DRY Goods[/B] [IMG]https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8040/8002090475_8a35f3a75c_c.jpg[/IMG] [B]The Pot:[/B] [IMG]https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8442/8002090772_f3c17a87f8_c.jpg[/IMG] FIRSTLY, heat that jammy up, not ripping crazy hot, but hot, You are gonna be going in with a lot of ingredients, so it's better to start with it hot so the re-coup time to bring back up to temp isn't that bad. ADD 2T of Oil, and 2T of Butter. The butter should foam almost instantly, and you want it to get a little browned around the edges, the toasty milk solids in the butter help add richness to the broth. Remember, more Color, More better when building a broth/stock/sauce. [IMG]https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8315/8002091574_8eedc18330_c.jpg[/IMG] [B][SIZE=4]NOW, ON TO ZEE COOOOOOKINGGGGGGGGGGGG![/SIZE][/B] First to the party, Onion, and garlic, let em go until they start getting some color on them, again, more color, more flavor. SALT, AND PEPPER YOUR ONIONS, they don't season themselves, and the salt will help draw out moisture so that things brown a little quicker. [IMG]https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8300/8002088832_674884be0d_c.jpg[/IMG] Don't burn em, but let em go, they aren't delicate flowers, and the heat will break up the chunks as it breaks them down. . . Once you get some color on them, time for the dry goods; Add some Onion powder, granulated garlic, your bullion cubes(if you are using liquid broth, hold off), and crushed red pepper. Give them all a stir to get things distributed. [IMG]https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8437/8002085945_e9cd6a3b9e_c.jpg[/IMG] 3 stars 1 reviews
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:06 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.