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Old 11-10-2015, 01:29 PM   #1
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Salting meats, advice please.

I know about salting beef and letting it stand to bring out the flavor.

Scott bought two 2" thick pork chops today. Does the salting apply to pork as well? I wanted to salt them before I wrapped them individually for the freezer, but wasn't sure. of the salting, so I didn't do it.

Any feedback on this question?
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Old 11-10-2015, 01:37 PM   #2
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This question is answered by the Cooks Illustrated people in this month's edition.

They tested it on chicken but I'm guessing it will work for pork, too.

https://www.cooksillustrated.com/how...after-freezing

I usually brine my pork before I freeze it, if Im freezing it
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Old 11-11-2015, 11:02 AM   #3
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So basically it's a mistake to buy the bags of already frozen breasts. They tend to be more economical per pound, even if you figure in the added weight loss, but don't have the same quality after cooking. Probably not as good for a dish where the protein is the star, but not much difference if used in a mixture of other ingredients which subsume the chicken.
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Old 11-11-2015, 12:05 PM   #4
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I have never used any salt prior to freezing.
I have never heard of doing this.
I have heard of salting, resting, rinsing and cooking beef, pork or fowl after it thawed, but never before freezing.
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Old 11-11-2015, 12:14 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
This question is answered by the Cooks Illustrated people in this month's edition.

They tested it on chicken but I'm guessing it will work for pork, too.

https://www.cooksillustrated.com/how...after-freezing

I usually brine my pork before I freeze it, if Im freezing it

This is good to know. Thanks Jen.
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Old 11-11-2015, 12:59 PM   #6
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I always brine my pork chops before freezing.

I'll never eat another chop that hasn't been brined.

I don't buy chicken breasts because I think they are nearly flavorless.
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Old 11-11-2015, 01:47 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
I always brine my pork chops before freezing.

I'll never eat another chop that hasn't been brined.
I'm going to have to try that. Do you put anything in the brine other than salt? How long do you brine them?

Quote:
I don't buy chicken breasts because I think they are nearly flavorless.
Agreed, and they are expensive.
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Old 11-11-2015, 02:21 PM   #8
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Agreed, and they are expensive.
Actually not so bad if you buy them bone in. Boneless and skinless is more expensive, and is less tasty. If you cook chicken skin on, then remove it before eating, you get more flavor without significantly more fat.

The hard part for me is not eating the tastiest part of the bird.
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Old 11-11-2015, 02:28 PM   #9
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[QUOTE=Kayelle;1443492]I always brine my pork chops before freezing.

I'll never eat another chop that hasn't been brined.

I don't buy chicken breasts because I think they are nearly flavorless.[/QUOTE]

Thank you. My family has finally learned to save their energy and don't even offer me white fowl meat. Big YUK! And I can see I am not the only one here who doesn't care for them either.
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Old 11-11-2015, 03:21 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
Actually not so bad if you buy them bone in. Boneless and skinless is more expensive, and is less tasty. If you cook chicken skin on, then remove it before eating, you get more flavor without significantly more fat.

The hard part for me is not eating the tastiest part of the bird.
That's only worthwhile if you like the white meat.
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Old 11-11-2015, 04:08 PM   #11
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I'm going to have to try that. Do you put anything in the brine other than salt? How long do you brine them?

Agreed, and they are expensive.
Taxi, we only buy thick chops. It's a lot easier to keep them from over cooking. I don't add anything but Kosher salt to the water. The ratio is 1/4 cup Kosher salt to 4 cups of water, and I brine them for 3 or 4 hrs before patting them dry and freezing them. When you cook them, you can add what ever herbs you may like such as garlic, pepper, etc. This works perfectly for us.

Unlike breasts, thighs just naturally don't need to be brined as they are always juicy and full of flavor.
If I preferred breasts, I certainly would brine them to improve them. The frozen breast bags often are injected with salt water in processing so you're buying frozen salt water at the price of chicken meat.
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Old 11-11-2015, 04:15 PM   #12
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Here by the time you add in bone weight, boneless, skinless breasts wind up being the same price on the actual meat.
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Old 11-11-2015, 04:53 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
I always brine my pork chops before freezing.

I'll never eat another chop that hasn't been brined.

I don't buy chicken breasts because I think they are nearly flavorless.
Bone-in, skin-on breasts are actually pretty good, roasted or grilled. I think of them as a neutral medium to which I add flavor, like beans, pasta and rice.

Putting herbs and spices under the skin, then roasting or grilling makes them really succulent. I even made boneless, skinless chicken breasts recently - seasoned them with salt and Penzey's Mural of Flavor and let them sit for about half an hour, then browned them in a saute pan and put them in the oven to finish cooking.

I've also poached them in water, salt and herbs, especially bay leaf, for use in other foods like chicken enchiladas or chicken salad. They taste quite good that way.
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Old 11-11-2015, 05:07 PM   #14
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I bought a day old BBQ chicken at Market Basket for the sole purpose of making chicken salad for sandwiches. Used some breast, some leg, froze the rest. It is the only time I use the breast meat.
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Old 11-11-2015, 05:47 PM   #15
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Bone-in, skin-on breasts are actually pretty good, roasted or grilled. I think of them as a neutral medium to which I add flavor, like beans, pasta and rice.

Putting herbs and spices under the skin, then roasting or grilling makes them really succulent. I even made boneless, skinless chicken breasts recently - seasoned them with salt and Penzey's Mural of Flavor and let them sit for about half an hour, then browned them in a saute pan and put them in the oven to finish cooking.

I've also poached them in water, salt and herbs, especially bay leaf, for use in other foods like chicken enchiladas or chicken salad. They taste quite good that way.
Do you brine your breasts GG?

I'd agree that sometimes breast meat has it's place in my kitchen, chicken salad or enchiladas for example. It just looks nicer for one thing, and all the sauce and such solves the dryness issues.

My dearest friend won't let dark meat touch her lips. I love her anyway.
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Old 11-11-2015, 06:02 PM   #16
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No, I don't have the patience I do usually dry-brine - I just season heavily with salt and whatever else and let it sit for a while, or marinate, which is similar to brining.
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Old 11-11-2015, 06:05 PM   #17
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If I preferred breasts, I certainly would brine them to improve them. The frozen breast bags often are injected with salt water in processing so you're buying frozen salt water at the price of chicken meat.
So, in effect, these chicken breasts are already brined. Brining adds salt and helps the meat retain moisture. The injection process does the same thing.
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Old 11-11-2015, 07:36 PM   #18
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So, in effect, these chicken breasts are already brined. Brining adds salt and helps the meat retain moisture. The injection process does the same thing.
Yup, that would be correct GG.
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Old 11-11-2015, 11:58 PM   #19
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A good brine will have both salt and sugar as the basic ingredients.

The other stuff: herbs, spices, broth, juice etch to yaste
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Old 11-12-2015, 01:27 AM   #20
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A good brine will have both salt and sugar as the basic ingredients.

The other stuff: herbs, spices, broth, juice etch to yaste
Opinions differ about a "good brine", although sugar is not necessary in a brine, but I agree some use it. Personally, I just don't see the need.
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