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Old 11-21-2011, 05:58 PM   #21
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I know that other cultures around the world make sure they don't waste anything on an animal. Like the saying goes, "Every part of the pig except the squeal."

But today I was watching a show on 18th Century cooking. And he was making "Stuffed Roosters Combs." Watching him eat the combs was bad enough. But it was what he made the stuffing with that I had a problem with. He used part of the chicken that I doubt I will ever eat. Starting with the feet and ending with the beef cowl with other ingredients in between that my stomach began to churn. I always thought I had a strong stomach. But I guess I was wrong. I am so glad I wasn't around in the 18th century. I would have starved to death.

I have never watched the Survivor show. But I understand that there are times when they have to catch bugs and other creatures of the land for their food. No thanks. I will pass. On the food and the show. I also can't watch the man that goes around the world eating bizarre foods. I guess I am spoiled. Simple foods will be fine for me. I will stay right here in America. And I am one who can watch a surgery with all the blood and gore and be fascinated.
You can get them at fine dining places here in the good ol USA.

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Old 11-21-2011, 10:34 PM   #22
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Quote:
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...
I am so glad I wasn't around in the 18th century. I would have starved to death.
...
No you wouldn't have. All the weird stuff would have been normal to you. It has a lot to do with what we are used to.
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Old 11-21-2011, 10:44 PM   #23
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I suppose they all have names ala Green Acres! (Just teasing!)
Oh gosh--there's Myrtle and Harriet, Henny, Penny, Silly Millie (Mildred), Prudence (Pru), Agatha (Aggie), Gertrude (Gertie), Scarlett, Elsie, Edith (Eddy), Alma, Vilda, Olivia, Dorthea (Dot), Geneivive (Genny), Netty, and Lillian. And then there is Cocky Rocky. So yes, they all have names. Harriet and Myrtle are the best about coming when called (and they are like little dogs--they are sooo funny). All the hens will probably be buried instead of being put in the stew pot--except maybe Cocky Rocky--he's pushing it.
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Old 11-21-2011, 10:53 PM   #24
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i've had chicken feet in chinese soup before. they looked more like somefhing from one of the csi shows rather rhan something to eat. all bloated and puffy like the body just washed up on shore.

as far as eating them goes, well, there wasn't much to do but nibble on rubbery skin. maybe it made the soup taste good, but the feet themselves were a waste of time. after dinner, though, i kept having the strangest feeling like i should be crossing a road somewhere...
Since the hens (and Cocky Rocky) are free-range, one of the things I have noticed is how BIG their legs (feet) below the part one normally eats have gotten. CR's are the size of my index finger. Harriet and Myrtle's are almost that big around. Not that I'm going to eat them--just saying--free-range chickens do develop good-sized legs and feet. Now, if s/one can tell me why some of my Rhode Island Reds have blue ears but don't lay blue eggs...
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Old 11-21-2011, 10:55 PM   #25
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my father in law cookd up some sheep lungs once. It was disgusting. I only took one bite because he was yelling at me to try it.
Sheep lungs huh? I've never even heard of them being eaten. How were they and how were they prepared and served? Sides?
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Old 11-21-2011, 11:11 PM   #26
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On one of the DDD shows he goes to a old converted school in to a restaurant. They made them there.
Hi PattY1, I love the way they were doing the cooking in that clip.

My hearing is messed up, so I couldn't hear what that rolled burger with all the pepper in it was called. Was it an Astro-Burger? It kinda sounded like A-hole burger, but I know that couldn't have been the name.

Thanks for posting that! I'm going to try frying some chicken that way. I've never tried that. I've made oven fried chicken, but there was no pan of oil involved. I wonder what temp she had that on. I'm guessing about 350 or so. 15 minutes per/side is what I heard her say. Is that right?
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Old 11-21-2011, 11:24 PM   #27
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Sheep lungs huh? I've never even heard of them being eaten. How were they and how were they prepared and served? Sides?
there is a reason you have never heard of them. They are virtually inedible. No sides or anything. He was experimenting so he stewed them up in the restaurant kitchen in a tomato sauce with loads of red pepper flakes to try and cover the flavor. It was chalky, grainy, tough, and I almost.......well...you know....
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Old 11-21-2011, 11:29 PM   #28
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there is a reason you have never heard of them. They are virtually inedible. No sides or anything. He was experimenting so he stewed them up in the restaurant kitchen in a tomato sauce with loads of red pepper flakes to try and cover the flavor. It was chalky, grainy, tough, and I almost.......well...you know....
Thanks for the info on them. I think I"ll pass on that one! There are only a few foods I've refused to try, but you just added that one to the list!
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Old 11-21-2011, 11:30 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by Rocklobster
there is a reason you have never heard of them. They are virtually inedible. No sides or anything. He was experimenting so he stewed them up in the restaurant kitchen in a tomato sauce with loads of red pepper flakes to try and cover the flavor. It was chalky, grainy, tough, and I almost.......well...you know....
Scratch off menu: sheeps lungs.

Thanks for being our guinea pig, RL!
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Old 11-21-2011, 11:34 PM   #30
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Scratch off menu: sheeps lungs.

Thanks for being our guinea pig, RL!
Here's a recipe for Calf's Lung. I thought maybe the sheeps lung might be prepared the same way. It actually sounds pretty good:


Calf Lung Stew

Salt and pepper one inch pieces of lungs and fry them in butter until well browned. Sprinkle with flour, stir well, and cook for a few minutes more (or thicken with blood). Cover with dry red wine or a mixture of wine and stock. Add a bouquet garni and some crushed garlic. Cover and bake in a moderate oven for 1 1/2 hours. Transfer the pieces of lung to a shallow baking dish and add some chopped and fried bacon, diced or whole mushrooms, and a number of small onions (and/or carrots) fried in butter or with the lean bacon. Cover with the strained cooking liquid and return to the oven for an additional 30 minutes. Garnish with croutons.
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Old 11-21-2011, 11:35 PM   #31
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Definitely off the bucket list of things to try--no sheeps' lungs.
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Old 11-22-2011, 02:22 AM   #32
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My birthday is on the 25th of Jan (Burns Night) so I eat a bit of haggis and have a shot of whisky.
The haggis has most of the lambs internal organs packed into its stomach.
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Old 11-22-2011, 08:12 AM   #33
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I try not to be too judgmental of other cultures. If anything, I feel like much of the food we eat in this country is a little boring, so I often go out of my way just to try something different.

As a child, I remember my grandmother (born in this country, but of German immigrant parents) who would tell my brother and I stories about growing up on a farm in the early 1900s, where they produced their own meat. They ate virtually every part of the animal, including lungs (also called "lights"), kidneys, heart, brains, and so forth. I recall one time I finished mowing her lawn and went to get a glass of lemonade from her fridge. When I opened the door, there was a pickled tongue sitting on a plate. I was a little horrified at the time, but I wouldn't having any problem trying it now.

With that in mind, here is a recipe for Veal Lights (lungs) that sounds quite tasty.

http://www.cookitsimply.com/recipe-0010-015w926.html
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Old 11-22-2011, 08:15 AM   #34
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Pickled tongue is delicious...I haven't had it for years, but it was one of my favorites at Christmas time...I just can't get my head around eating tripe...
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Old 11-22-2011, 08:19 AM   #35
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...I just can't get my head around eating tripe...
Try Menudo. It's delicious! Just don't think about too much about what you're eating.
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Old 11-22-2011, 09:48 AM   #36
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What must people from other cultures think of cheese, when they hear a description?

Take some milk and make it curdle by adding rennet*, drain it, squish the liquid out, let it sit in the cellar for days, months, or years. Sometimes mould is grown inside or on the outside of this mass of curdled milk.


*traditional method of making rennet according to Wikipedia:"Dried and cleaned stomachs of young calves are sliced into small pieces and then put into saltwater or whey, together with some vinegar or wine to lower the pH of the solution. After some time (overnight or several days), the solution is filtered. The crude rennet that remains in the filtered solution can then be used to coagulate milk. About 1 gram of this solution can normally coagulate 2 to 4 liters of milk."
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Old 11-22-2011, 10:58 AM   #37
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Try Menudo. It's delicious! Just don't think about too much about what you're eating.
Absolutely my favorite soup in the world, Steve!
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