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Old 06-12-2012, 01:44 PM   #1
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How to Bake Crispy Chicken Wings?

Hello. I am currently trying to replicate a chicken wing recipe that I tried while on vacation. The basic goal is to get sauced and baked chicken wings to be crispy.

Here's what I am doing now:

1) toss the wings in a seasoned flour (garlic powder, salt, pepper, cayenne) and let the coating firm up in the refrigerator for an hour.

2) Mix equal parts butter, Louisiana-style hot sauce, and tomato paste and dip the wings in the mixture

3) Place on grilling racks and bake for 30 minutes at 450 C, turning them over after 20 minutes.

I'm pretty happy with the flavour of the wings but the end result is not crispy enough (still a little saucy). I was thinking about adding some fine bread crumbs to the butter/sauce/paste mixture but I am looking for any suggestions anyone might have.

Thanks.

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Old 06-12-2012, 02:04 PM   #2
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Just curious, was the chicken you had on vacation also baked?
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Old 06-12-2012, 02:31 PM   #3
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Chicken wings are generally sauced after they are cooked.

Bake your wings and then toss them in a bowl with the sauce.
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Old 06-12-2012, 02:41 PM   #4
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You can't expect crispy results when liquids are added prior to baking. Yes, crispy chicken under the layer of sauce is a nice effect. Try applying koshering salt rather lavishly and leaving uncovered int he refrigerator all day or all night on paper towels. The surface should come out dry, but this sort of dry brining should keep some moisture inside the pieces so the interior doesn't dry so badly.

I'd leave out the flour and just brush them lightly with oil and bake them after they come to room temperature. At that point, they should be as crispy as baking can get them. Then, the sauce with enough body to stick can be applied and with the seasonings that used to be with the flour, and they can go back in the oven to bake it on.
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Old 06-12-2012, 04:00 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Chicken wings are generally sauced after they are cooked.

Bake your wings and then toss them in a bowl with the sauce.

I agree!

We bake em at 425 degrees for 45 minutes to an hour with just a light coating of oil and turn them halfway through baking. Then we shake them in a tupperware type bowl with a tight fitting lid. The sauce is just butter, hot sauce and cayenne pepper to taste.
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Old 06-12-2012, 05:03 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Chicken wings are generally sauced after they are cooked.

Bake your wings and then toss them in a bowl with the sauce.
+2

Or as Bea says sauce them at some middle point during the baking. I haven't done this recipe but I would look for signs of crispness already developing before saucing them.
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Old 06-12-2012, 06:16 PM   #7
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I used to make oven wings all the time for Superbowl parties. And they came out as if they were grilled. After you bake the sauce onto them, stick them under the broiler to caramelize the sauce and crisp up. Watch carefully and flip once. You can toss them in more sauce after you pull them out if you wish.
Actually, for the amount of wings I was making I added one more step, I par-boiled them first. The three B's method: boil, bake and broil. You can turn out a lot of wings this way, but the kitchen sure does get hot. The next day I used the liquid to make chicken soup with.
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Old 06-12-2012, 06:40 PM   #8
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unless you really like the taste of breaded wings, nix the flour.

lightly dust the wings (if you must) with a dry spice rub, then put in the broiler pan in your oven at the hghest slot position, the closest to the flame or element. let broil for about 5 minutes, flip and rearrange the ones that are browned the least with the ones least cooked. let broil another 5 minutes, and flip and rearrange again. the idea is to have all of the wings roughly evenly browned.
let broil 2 minutes, and flip and rearange again. a final flip for the ones that aren't done through may be necessary.

remove wings and toss in a bowl containing about a cup per 2 dozen wings of a mixture of franks red hot sauce and melted butter.

more later, sorry, baseball practice calls.
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Old 06-13-2012, 12:28 PM   #9
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Thanks for all the suggestions. I not sure if the wings I had on vacation were bake for the whole cooking process, but the sauce was definitely cooked into the wings which is what I am looking for. The end result doesn't have to be super crispy but I want the sauce to be fully cooked in and not messy at all. Is the flour coating preventing the sauce from fully crisping in to the wings? I'm only using it to help the sauce stick to the wings throughout the cooking process.

I like the idea of saucing them half way through. I'm cooking them in a convection oven right now. Would broiling them in a toaster oven to finish them be better for making them crispy? Thanks again.
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Old 06-14-2012, 10:37 AM   #10
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I make baked wings for my brother who has a hard time with fried foods.

for the ultimate crispy baked wing:

do not flour the wings,

Place them in a deep baking pan as so the grease does not run off. Cook the wings in a coventional oven at 425 for about 50-75 minutes, draining the juices periodically. That is the key part, if you dont drain the juices the chicken will get rubbery. I also add a seasoned salt/paprika rub on the wings after they are about half way done. Continue cooking to desired level of crispness. Definitely sauce the wings after they are cooked fully.
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Old 06-20-2012, 01:26 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BBQ Mikey View Post
I make baked wings for my brother who has a hard time with fried foods.

for the ultimate crispy baked wing:

do not flour the wings,

Place them in a deep baking pan as so the grease does not run off. Cook the wings in a coventional oven at 425 for about 50-75 minutes, draining the juices periodically. That is the key part, if you dont drain the juices the chicken will get rubbery. I also add a seasoned salt/paprika rub on the wings after they are about half way done. Continue cooking to desired level of crispness. Definitely sauce the wings after they are cooked fully.
I've never tried baking chicken wings. The grease collected allows the skin to get crispy (?), and drain the excess grease periodically as that will make the skin rubbery? I've got to try that one of these nights when it's too much bother to deep fry. A simple dry rub is probably a good idea too, and I can always coat them with some sort of Buffalo wing sauce near the end of the cooking. Thanks for those tips (I'll forgo any kind of coating).
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Old 06-20-2012, 01:44 AM   #12
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yup, the fat that renders (baked or broiled) tends to partially fry the wings. they're nowhere near deep, shallow, or even pan tried, but they do fry a bit; enough to count.

oh yeah, i wanted to mention that you can simply toss your wings in a cooled mix of frank's and butter (and additional ground cayenne, garlic, onion, or whatever) then broil or bake.
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Old 06-20-2012, 01:56 AM   #13
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yup, the fat that renders (baked or broiled) tends to partially fry the wings. they're nowhere near deep, shallow, or even pan tried, but they do fry a bit; enough to count.

oh yeah, i wanted to mention that you can simply toss your wings in a cooled mix of frank's and butter (and additional ground cayenne, garlic, onion, or whatever) then broil or bake.
I'll line my deep baking pan with non-stick aluminum foil for easy clean up. I'll also flip them around during cooking. I know it probably won't turn out restaurant style chicken wing nirvana, but still...
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Old 06-20-2012, 01:59 AM   #14
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that definitely helps. i always wrap the foil tray in aluminum foul. come to think of it, most broiler trays are slotted so as to let the fat drip away too quickly. you NEED to line the broiler tray with foil or they won't partially fry, as discussed.
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Old 06-20-2012, 02:13 AM   #15
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that definitely helps. i always wrap the foil tray in aluminum foul. come to think of it, most broiler trays are slotted so as to let the fat drip away too quickly. you NEED to line the broiler tray with foil or they won't partially fry, as discussed.
Right, I see what you're saying. Some collected fat that is drained periodically is allowed to crisp up the skin. If you allow too much fat to collect without draining off the excess, the fat grease never reaches true deep fat frying temps, and makes the skin cook up rubbery. Gotcha.
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Old 06-20-2012, 07:32 AM   #16
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The slots allow the fat to run off so the broiler won't ignite the fat and cause a fire.
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Old 06-20-2012, 09:17 AM   #17
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The slots allow the fat to run off so the broiler won't ignite the fat and cause a fire.
Maybe bake in pan as described above, then coat the wings in sauce and broil them the last 10 minutes?

It's getting yummier by the minute.
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Old 06-20-2012, 09:53 AM   #18
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My recommendation is to put the wings on a short wire rack, and set that in an aluminum foil covered pan. The rack keeps the wings out of the grease, and after cooking when the pan has cooled you can just wad up the aluminum, toss it, and put the pan back in the cabinet.
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Old 06-20-2012, 10:07 AM   #19
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My recommendation is to put the wings on a short wire rack, and set that in an aluminum foil covered pan. The rack keeps the wings out of the grease, and after cooking when the pan has cooled you can just wad up the aluminum, toss it, and put the pan back in the cabinet.
While this is the way to go, cleaning the rack is the challenge.
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Old 06-20-2012, 10:12 AM   #20
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I saw on the show the Chew Michael symon baked his wings and then when done, deep fried them only for a couple of min. I tried this and they came out great ! not oily like if you deep fried them from the start. Nice and crispy.
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