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Old 11-21-2016, 09:57 AM   #101
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Most of our larger grocers carry duck fat. I have never seen chicken fat but then again, I've never looked for it.
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Old 11-21-2016, 10:02 AM   #102
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Most of our larger grocers carry duck fat. I have never seen chicken fat but then again, I've never looked for it.
Hmm....
Will have to ask or look for it on next trip to store.
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Old 11-21-2016, 10:21 AM   #103
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I've only seen Brome Lac brand but I'm sure there must be others out there.



But it isn't any cheaper than the duck itself
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Old 11-21-2016, 11:01 AM   #104
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Going to my cousins' for Christmas and as there will be 8 of us there'll be a turkey (George Washington's Revenge!). Even my cousin**, who is the chef at a British Embassy which will remain nameless, and will be doing the cooking, can't make a turkey taste good. Over here if you want a decent turkey, ie a Norfolk Bronze or Norfolk Black, you are looking at spending the equivalent of $100 per bird. Supermarket birds are much cheaper but don't taste of much.

When Mum and Dad were alive and there were only 3 of us for Christmas dinner we used to have pheasant (another cousin used to beat for a shoot in Wales and supplied the birds to all the family).

** My chef cousin was in the Royal Navy and once cooked for a Trafalgar Day banquet in the USA. Your President (Bush Senior IIRC) was guest of honour. I'll stop showing off now.
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Old 11-22-2016, 12:42 PM   #105
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Pirate would like you to mail that jar of duck fat to him so he can make some home fried potatoes.

I know they sell chicken fat. But do they sell duck fat, even on line?
I've seen this:

Duck Fat, All-Natural | Shop D'Artagnan

At $7.99 per 7 ounces... well, I can buy a duck for $13, and get a pint of duck fat, plus I get to eat the duck? And render the rest of the carcass for stock.

A little more work for definite. And ducks are a mess, after you cook one you pretty much have to clean the oven.

It was worth while this week to cook a duck. Invited some of my friends from work over for a pre-Thanksgiving dinner party, had some nice duck, and spent a morning and an afternoon rendering fat, and making stock.

So got duck fat and stock for both basting and the stuffing.

I think it was a cost-effective maneuver. Plus it was nice to have some of my bookstore friends over before the nightmare that is and always shall be Black Friday weekend. Wine was drunk, duck was eaten, good times were had.

I am going to end up with a lot of leftovers this year, anyone canned cooked turkey meat before? I got a twenty pound bird for four people.... Smallest the farm I get them from had. They were short on smaller birds this year, good summer for them, and the ones they had pegged as 10-15 pounders ended up around 20.

I'm thinking Friday morning before I go to work, putting the rest of the cut meat into jars, and throwing them through the pressure cooker, for future pot pies.

What you folks think?

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Old 11-22-2016, 12:59 PM   #106
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I am going to end up with a lot of leftovers this year, anyone canned cooked turkey meat before? I got a twenty pound bird for four people.... Smallest the farm I get them from had. They were short on smaller birds this year, good summer for them, and the ones they had pegged as 10-15 pounders ended up around 20.

I'm thinking Friday morning before I go to work, putting the rest of the cut meat into jars, and throwing them through the pressure cooker, for future pot pies.

What you folks think?
I don't have a pressure canner, so I freeze leftover turkey, or any other, meat.

I know you know you're taking a chance by canning turkey in a pressure cooker. For future readers, I just want to mention that this technique is not approved by the FDA as a safe method for preserving meat.
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Old 11-22-2016, 01:06 PM   #107
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Pirate would like you to mail that jar of duck fat to him so he can make some home fried potatoes.

I know they sell chicken fat. But do they sell duck fat, even on line?
"They" sell goose fat in supermarkets over here. Something of a fashion item due to food programmes all things considered it makes delicious roast potatoes.
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Old 11-22-2016, 01:37 PM   #108
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"They" sell goose fat in supermarkets over here. Something of a fashion item due to food programmes all things considered it makes delicious roast potatoes.
Yeah it does make delicious roast potatoes. That is kind of a go to with the duck fat. Also scrambled eggs, stuffing, toast...

I guess hipsters will find it, but the best comes if you cook an actual duck.

Or goose fat if you cook a goose.

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Old 11-23-2016, 08:02 AM   #109
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You can print off the USDA guide for canning meats, poultry and seafoods. Sounds like a good idea, Foxy.

I prefer to have something ready on the shelf than to keep on forgetting to take something out the freezer and delaying all my plans.

This will take you straight to their Guide 5 for the above.
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Old 11-23-2016, 12:06 PM   #110
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Just a thought, but what about making turkey jerky?


On the subject of duck, DW doesn't allow me to make them in the house anymore because of the smell and clean up. So it's one of those things that I'll order when I see it on the menu in a restaurant. I think I'll try and grill one outside soon.

Getting back,to turkeys, one of the best tricks that I ever tried was when the turkey was done cooking, I flipped it over and rested it breast side down.

When I was ready to carve it, you wouldn't believe how much juice had pooled under the skin around the breast. It made the breasts incredibly moist.
The only down side was that the roasting rack made marks on the skin on the breasts, so it wasn't pretty. But who cares as soon as you start to slice it.

Anyone ever try resting their birds breast side down?
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Old 11-24-2016, 12:36 PM   #111
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I just had the wonderful experience of turning the bird over onto its back, breast side up.
Its half way through the roasting period.
I had a hard time as the turkey is 23 pounds.
I need a pair of gloves to do this with. Any suggestions? Must be thermal protective and not allow hot juices to penetrate them. TIA.
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Old 11-24-2016, 12:51 PM   #112
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I just had the wonderful experience of turning the bird over onto its back, breast side up.
Its half way through the roasting period.
I had a hard time as the turkey is 23 pounds.
I need a pair of gloves to do this with. Any suggestions? Must be thermal protective and not allow hot juices to penetrate them. TIA.
I have two of these and they work great. I use them to turn and move things around in the oven and on the grill also.


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I have also seen silicone oven gloves >>> https://www.itronicsmall.com/product...kHUaAiIa8P8HAQ

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Old 11-24-2016, 03:59 PM   #113
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Just a thought, but what about making turkey jerky?


On the subject of duck, DW doesn't allow me to make them in the house anymore because of the smell and clean up. So it's one of those things that I'll order when I see it on the menu in a restaurant. I think I'll try and grill one outside soon.

Getting back,to turkeys, one of the best tricks that I ever tried was when the turkey was done cooking, I flipped it over and rested it breast side down.

When I was ready to carve it, you wouldn't believe how much juice had pooled under the skin around the breast. It made the breasts incredibly moist.
The only down side was that the roasting rack made marks on the skin on the breasts, so it wasn't pretty. But who cares as soon as you start to slice it.

Anyone ever try resting their birds breast side down?
Craig did a tea, Asian spices smoked one before. I really liked it, him not so much, but he's not a huge duck fan either.

I do like Roll bones and cook upside down for the first half. We only have a 12.4 pounder but I flip it using the no fear, no hesitation, just do it approach. We dry brined the fresh turkey we got, first time we tried that. I did read about resting it breast side down in 1 of the recipes I was looking at, so we may give that a whirl too since we tried something else new.
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Old 11-24-2016, 04:27 PM   #114
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I remember first time I had even heard of turning a turkey was at my sister's. More than 20 years ago.

As the men-folk were not there in time of need, chosen was I as my sis is -5 ft nothing. (Turkey almost bigger than her)

Of course, it splashed, ruined a brand new shirt, first time wearing, never to be the same - she laughed - me, not so much...
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Old 11-24-2016, 05:47 PM   #115
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I remember first time I had even heard of turning a turkey was at my sister's. More than 20 years ago.

As the men-folk were not there in time of need, chosen was I as my sis is -5 ft nothing. (Turkey almost bigger than her)

Of course, it splashed, ruined a brand new shirt, first time wearing, never to be the same - she laughed - me, not so much...
You have to do it with it on a rack, so you only have to worry about juices inside, but centrifugal force helps there as long as you keep it level, as well as the heat obviously. I'm only 5, 1.
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Old 11-24-2016, 07:56 PM   #116
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Hope you all had a good thanksgiving. Turkey was 19 pounds, cooked 5 hours, basting with duck fat, butter, and spices every 20 minutes.

Decided to do the stuffing seperate due to size of the turkey, just stuffed it with lemons, thyme, garlic, and rosemary loosely for aromatics.

Started it first half hour at 450 to get a good skin sear going, then backed down to 320, putting a foil 'tent' over the breast with toothpicks.

Turned out great. I am very happy.

https://goo.gl/photos/dvfc8GzWB1A8okdr9

https://goo.gl/photos/MqprkSziByZGN4kXA

https://goo.gl/photos/PPutZ5ck2p9pjR6R8

Happy thanksgiving all!
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Old 11-24-2016, 10:29 PM   #117
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We're having our Thanksgiving turkey, tomorrow 11 am. Tonight we spatchcocked the turkey. It was 15 lbs and we used a kitchen shears and resorted to a hacksaw for a little of it. I was teaching my middle son how to do it. Instead of slow roasting for 3-4 hours, we'll cook it at 450 degrees F for 90 minutes or maybe 100 minutes. I seriously like learning from Good Eats: Gallery: How to Cook a Spatchcocked Turkey: The Fastest, Easiest Thanksgiving Turkey: Serious Eats | Serious Eats
which was mentioned by someone here, and I thank you!
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Old 11-25-2016, 06:55 AM   #118
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You have to do it with it on a rack, so you only have to worry about juices inside, but centrifugal force helps there as long as you keep it level, as well as the heat obviously. I'm only 5, 1.

Of course she would have done it had I not been there, and I'm sure she wouldn't have let it slip - practice does indeed help.

Just reread your statement - are you saying you take the bird off of the roasting pan - place it on another rack - turn it - then place it back in the roasting pan?
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Old 11-25-2016, 07:38 AM   #119
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Of course she would have done it had I not been there, and I'm sure she wouldn't have let it slip - practice does indeed help.

Just reread your statement - are you saying you take the bird off of the roasting pan - place it on another rack - turn it - then place it back in the roasting pan?
No, I cook it on a rack in a roasting pan.
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Old 11-25-2016, 07:42 AM   #120
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We're having our Thanksgiving turkey, tomorrow 11 am. Tonight we spatchcocked the turkey. It was 15 lbs and we used a kitchen shears and resorted to a hacksaw for a little of it. I was teaching my middle son how to do it. Instead of slow roasting for 3-4 hours, we'll cook it at 450 degrees F for 90 minutes or maybe 100 minutes. I seriously like learning from Good Eats: Gallery: How to Cook a Spatchcocked Turkey: The Fastest, Easiest Thanksgiving Turkey: Serious Eats | Serious Eats
which was mentioned by someone here, and I thank you!
I did a chicken that way recently and it worked great. I wanted to do the turkey that way too but Craig didn't want to.
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