"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Chicken, Turkey & other Fowl
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-06-2013, 04:11 PM   #1
Head Chef
 
Skittle68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 890
Smoking a chicken

I have a whole chicken in the smoker right now. Im so excited!! I brined it overnight, then injected it with liquid I soaked garlic and herbs in for about and hour. (I strained the liquid off so my injector wouldn't get clogged) Hopefully it will be as good as the turkey I smoked for thanksgiving :) yum!! Wish me luck!



Click image for larger version

Name:	image-1537663582.jpg
Views:	262
Size:	59.0 KB
ID:	16767



Click image for larger version

Name:	image-2010358516.jpg
Views:	252
Size:	53.1 KB
ID:	16768

Skittle68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2013, 04:52 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 25,047
Sounds great, Skittle! Good luck!
__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2013, 04:56 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
What kind of smoker ya got, Skittles?
What kind of wood are you using?
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2013, 04:57 PM   #4
Admiral of the Texas Navy
 
forty_caliber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Republic of Texas
Posts: 3,413
Use the leftovers for smoked chicken salad....

.40
__________________
"I must say as to what I have seen of Texas it is the garden spot of the world. The best land and the best prospects for health I ever saw, and I do believe it is a fortune to any man to come here."
Davy Crockett, 1836
forty_caliber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2013, 05:14 PM   #5
Executive Chef
 
salt and pepper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Montana
Posts: 2,855
You won't need luck! Seems like you have it under control.
salt and pepper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2013, 05:44 PM   #6
Head Chef
 
Skittle68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 890
What kind of smoker? Um, it's red and electric lol. I'm using hickory. Can't wait to try it! Love the transformation:



Click image for larger version

Name:	image-1594725324.jpg
Views:	207
Size:	57.4 KB
ID:	16769



Click image for larger version

Name:	image-461144111.jpg
Views:	200
Size:	54.8 KB
ID:	16770


Now it rests!
Skittle68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2013, 06:49 PM   #7
Head Chef
 
Skittle68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 890
Hmm, hmm, hmm. Boy was that a lot of work for a mediocre chicken!! The flavor was great, and it was so juicy that even after I sliced up the white meat and put it on my plate, it was still dripping. But it was CHEWY! The dark meat was like leather. Pretty much inedible. I'm boiling the carcass right now because that's the only way I can think of to get the dark meat off the bone. Do you think it was the chicken?? I monitor the inside of the smoker, not just the temp gauge on the lid, and it wasn't quite up to 225 where it should have been, because it is so cold out. It was over 200 so I figured it would be fine. Could the temp being too low be why it was so chewy?? It took about 3 1/2 hours to get up to 160. I'm leaning toward maybe I bought an ancient chicken. It was a small one, and didn't say it was a broiler hen (is "baking hen" the same thing? If so, oops...), so I thought it was just a regular chicken. Ugh I'm so disappointed. See, I needed luck lol!



Click image for larger version

Name:	image-3842834482.jpg
Views:	205
Size:	62.3 KB
ID:	16771

It looks so dang yummy too :(
Skittle68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2013, 06:59 PM   #8
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 48,968
I'd guess the dark meat was undercooked.

The dark meat of a chicken really needs to cook to around 180F to a 185F to give you the texture you expect from it. Typically, when you cook a chicken it naturally cooks so the breasts are 160 at about the same time as the thighs get to the 180s.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2013, 07:08 PM   #9
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 25,047
Oh no, that's too bad, Skittle. It did look lovely. Hopefully you'll get some nice broth.
__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2013, 07:14 PM   #10
Head Chef
 
Skittle68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 890
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I'd guess the dark meat was undercooked.

The dark meat of a chicken really needs to cook to around 180F to a 185F to give you the texture you expect from it. Typically, when you cook a chicken it naturally cooks so the breasts are 160 at about the same time as the thighs get to the 180s.
Hmm, that's interesting- I didn't temp the legs, figuring if the thicker breast were done, the legs would be too. I didn't want to overcook it because I didn't want it to get tough, but it sounds like you think it would have been less tough if I had left it in longer. I'm confused. How am I supposed to know when to leave it in longer, when the thermometer says to take it out?? My turkey I smoked was absolutely perfect when I took it out at 160 (but the smoker was at 225 where it should be)
Skittle68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2013, 08:28 PM   #11
Admiral of the Texas Navy
 
forty_caliber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Republic of Texas
Posts: 3,413
The queuing mantra of low and slow doesn't really apply to fowl.

Chickens and turkeys can stand much higher temps while still absorbing plenty of flavorful smoke. Next time try it at 325 or so.

.40
__________________
"I must say as to what I have seen of Texas it is the garden spot of the world. The best land and the best prospects for health I ever saw, and I do believe it is a fortune to any man to come here."
Davy Crockett, 1836
forty_caliber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2013, 10:12 PM   #12
Head Chef
 
Skittle68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 890
Quote:
Originally Posted by forty_caliber View Post
The queuing mantra of low and slow doesn't really apply to fowl.

Chickens and turkeys can stand much higher temps while still absorbing plenty of flavorful smoke. Next time try it at 325 or so.

.40
If it were in the oven, that would be possible, but it's an electric smoker. In the summer it could probably get up to 275-300, but it's cold outside.

I've made chicken sous vide, and it wasn't chewy. If you are aiming for a certain internal temp, why would you need the external temp to be so high? I'm genuinely asking here, because I feel like I'm missing something (although I still think it might be partially the chicken's fault)
Skittle68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 05:24 AM   #13
Admiral of the Texas Navy
 
forty_caliber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Republic of Texas
Posts: 3,413
Not sure what smoker you have. A wood fired or my Traeger electric smoker are capable of higher temps. One key with smoking is to use temperature, not time to measure doneness. I use one of those digital remote read jobs. I generally pull the chicken at 155-160 and allow it to rest for 10 minutes.

Cooking the chicken longer at a lower temp just means that it will absorb more smoke...maybe too much so that it turns bitter.

How was the chicken placed in the smoker? in a pan? Directly on the rack? How many times did you open the door to check on the bird?

.40
__________________
"I must say as to what I have seen of Texas it is the garden spot of the world. The best land and the best prospects for health I ever saw, and I do believe it is a fortune to any man to come here."
Davy Crockett, 1836
forty_caliber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 10:09 AM   #14
Head Chef
 
Skittle68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 890
Quote:
Originally Posted by forty_caliber View Post
Not sure what smoker you have. A wood fired or my Traeger electric smoker are capable of higher temps. One key with smoking is to use temperature, not time to measure doneness. I use one of those digital remote read jobs. I generally pull the chicken at 155-160 and allow it to rest for 10 minutes.

Cooking the chicken longer at a lower temp just means that it will absorb more smoke...maybe too much so that it turns bitter.

How was the chicken placed in the smoker? in a pan? Directly on the rack? How many times did you open the door to check on the bird?

.40
I opened the small door at the bottom four times to add more chips. I put the thermometer probe in before the chicken went in, and took the bird out when the digital read said 160. It's on a cord, so I could read the temp without opening the smoker. It was directly on the rack, right over the drip pan, which had water in it.
Skittle68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 10:21 AM   #15
Admiral of the Texas Navy
 
forty_caliber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Republic of Texas
Posts: 3,413
I'm not finding anything obviously wrong. Maybe it was a bad chicken. Next time try it without the water pan. Maybe that would help.
__________________
"I must say as to what I have seen of Texas it is the garden spot of the world. The best land and the best prospects for health I ever saw, and I do believe it is a fortune to any man to come here."
Davy Crockett, 1836
forty_caliber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 10:50 AM   #16
Head Chef
 
Skittle68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 890
Quote:
Originally Posted by forty_caliber View Post
I'm not finding anything obviously wrong. Maybe it was a bad chicken. Next time try it without the water pan. Maybe that would help.
Thanks- chances are it will be warmer when I get around to using the smoker again, so I'll make sure I let it get as hot as possible. I think maybe because the temp was so low, the dark meat didn't get hot enough, like Andy said. The white meat was ok, just sort of stringy and chewy. So I think maybe it was a combination of bad chicken, and temperature was too low. The temp was slightly higher for my perfect turkey, except I had a similar problem with the dark meat, to a much lesser degree. Maybe the dark meat's temp on the turkey got a little higher due to the higher temp in the smoker (only about a 25 difference, or less), which made it edible. If it was a tough chicken, it probably would have made the dark meat problem a lot worse, too. Thanks for the suggestions everyone!
Skittle68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 10:59 AM   #17
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
I got my BIL an electric smoker for Christmas. At the suggestion of a member here who has used one, I went with a Masterbuilt because it is insulated. More common electric smokers like you find in Lowes and the like are notorious for not being able to get hot enough in cold climates. An insulation blanket or some type of wind break or shroud around the smoker will help. I use a shroud around my charcoal smoker just because I can close the vents more and make the charcoal last longer. Plus it helps in winter.
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 11:10 AM   #18
Head Chef
 
Skittle68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 890
Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
I got my BIL an electric smoker for Christmas. At the suggestion of a member here who has used one, I went with a Masterbuilt because it is insulated. More common electric smokers like you find in Lowes and the like are notorious for not being able to get hot enough in cold climates. An insulation blanket or some type of wind break or shroud around the smoker will help. I use a shroud around my charcoal smoker just because I can close the vents more and make the charcoal last longer. Plus it helps in winter.
When I did the turkey I put a big cardboard box around it because it was like 0 outside and windy. It made a huge difference. Didn't think I would need it yesterday, since it was pretty nice out (20). If I use it again before spring, I might just supplement with charcoal to get the temp up higher. I don't have a blanket I would use for the smoker and I have no where I would be willing to store a big cardboard box, just for the smoker. I live in a 600 sq ft house with no garage! Lol. When I do poultry again, I will shoot for 300. I looked at some smoker tips and tricks and everyone seems to be in agreement that too long and too low can equal rubbery.
Skittle68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 11:18 AM   #19
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
By insulation blanket I meant one you would buy, not something you would have at home. They are fire proof. Sometimes they are called welding blankets.
Just so I don't confuse anyone
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 11:37 AM   #20
Head Chef
 
Skittle68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 890
Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
By insulation blanket I meant one you would buy, not something you would have at home. They are fire proof. Sometimes they are called welding blankets.
Just so I don't confuse anyone
Oh ok, good!! I was thinking that I wouldn't want anything touching the smoker, because that would be dangerous, but I didn't want to push any buttons lol. I've never seen one of those- I'll have to look for one. I have a smoker cover, but it's to protect from the elements, not to use while hot. Plus I would want the top open to allow some air flow
Skittle68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.