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Old 02-07-2020, 02:41 PM   #1
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Share Your Favorite Italian Sandwich/Grinder

My favorite Italian sandwich is this:
Grinder roll, either very soft white Bread, or Multi-Grain with seeds and nuta
Slices of a good, spicy Pepperoni to cover
Slices of Soprasetta to cover
Slices of hot Capicola to cover in two layers
EVOO
Sliced, Ripe black olives to cover
Thin-Sliced sweet onion to accent
Thin slices ripe tomato to cover
Thin Slices fo Sweet, Red Bell Pepper to cover
Thin slices aged Elemental Cheese to cover.

Drizzle Extra-Virgin olive oil on both rolls, on the inside. Layer first the Pepperoni, then Soprasetta, then the Capicola. Add the black olives, Cheese, onion, and finally the tomato. gently toast the sandwich by roasting in a 400' F. oven to crisp the crust slightly. Serve hot.

Build me your favorite Italian sandwich.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

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Old 02-07-2020, 02:57 PM   #2
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Muffaletta!
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Old 02-07-2020, 03:13 PM   #3
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My family is of Italian heritage. Grandparents came from Italy to America. No one in my family toasted an Italian hero roll/sandwich.


Split long roll (with or without sesame seeds). Sprinkle with red wine vinegar, salt, pepper, favorite seasoning (I use my house blend which includes garlic, onion, ground red pepper), dry rubbed oregano. Close and press roll together to make sure seasoning is soaked in. Sprinkle with olive oil and repeat. Layer Genoa DiLusso salami, Imported ham, pepperoni, Capicola and provolone. Then layer with fresh basil leaves, sliced tomato, red onion and lettuce.

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Old 02-07-2020, 03:40 PM   #4
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For many years (very many lol) I have made this sandwich. I don't care what you say, I call it a Hoagie and this is how I like it. Take a long roll, split it open, drizzle EVOO all over, sprinkle a little oregano. Add lettuce, tomato, onion, boiled ham, Genoa salami, provolone cheese and salt and I am starving for one now (thank you) and I don't have the ingredients. lol
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Old 02-08-2020, 11:35 PM   #5
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My favorite is a hot chicken parm sub. We called it a sub down on NJ, not grinder or hoagie.
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Old 02-08-2020, 11:42 PM   #6
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My favorite Italian sandwich is an Italian cold cut sub from a small deli here in town. It takes me back to the flavors of the subs I used to have when I was younger. No other Italian sub tastes as good as this one. A few years ago I used to go there every Friday. I went there so often that they started making my sandwich when they saw me come in the door.

My second favorite was from a sandwich shop near where I worked my last job. It was prosciutto, pesto and fresh mozzarella on a ciabatta roll.
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Old 02-09-2020, 08:06 AM   #7
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Not sure if they classify as Italian, but here it goes.
Back in the4 day when I lived in Philly, as a fund raiser to raise money for our class, we would go to the local Hoagie shop ( normally I would say Hero, being from NY, but to me, this sandwich will always be known as a hoagie), and buy a bunch of varieties of Hoagies. We would then sell them at the school adding a few bucks to make profit. So Im sure there were many Italian varieties in there, but being vegetarian,, I stuck with the Provolone Hoagie which was as follows . Hoagie roll, mayo, Provolone, lettuce, tomatoes, pickles pepperoncini , lettuce , onions , Italian dressing and a sprinkle of oregano. They were great, and one of the many foods that I identify from Philly and have brought back with me as a staple in my choices for dinner when Im making a menu.

Another favorite is a Panini with Mozzarella , sone dried tomatoes pressed between basically garlic bread.

Also, Meatball hero. Loved them as a kid, went vegetarian and couldn't find good meatballs until recently when I came across a good recipe for meatballs. A place in Boston called "Clover Food Labs" ( doesn't sound inviting, but make great meatballs out of impossible burger products). They make vegetarian meatball sandwiches that are as good if ntt better than the meatball hero I had back in the day. They serve them on fluffy fresh Pita bread ( not those big dried out ones, but these are spongy and great.
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Old 02-09-2020, 09:50 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larry_stewart View Post
Not sure if they classify as Italian, but here it goes.
Back in the4 day when I lived in Philly, as a fund raiser to raise money for our class, we would go to the local Hoagie shop ( normally I would say Hero, being from NY, but to me, this sandwich will always be known as a hoagie), and buy a bunch of varieties of Hoagies. We would then sell them at the school adding a few bucks to make profit. So Im sure there were many Italian varieties in there, but being vegetarian,, I stuck with the Provolone Hoagie which was as follows . Hoagie roll, mayo, Provolone, lettuce, tomatoes, pickles pepperoncini , lettuce , onions , Italian dressing and a sprinkle of oregano. They were great, and one of the many foods that I identify from Philly and have brought back with me as a staple in my choices for dinner when Im making a menu.
Larry, I was born in Essington, Pa., close to Philly. I don't know where the Hoagie shop was, but a relative worked there and that is where I developed my love for Hoagies. Wouldn't it be funny if we both went to the same shop. lol
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Old 02-09-2020, 03:09 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larry_stewart View Post
Also, Meatball hero. Loved them as a kid, went vegetarian and couldn't find good meatballs until recently when I came across a good recipe for meatballs. A place in Boston called "Clover Food Labs" ( doesn't sound inviting, but make great meatballs out of impossible burger products).
It would be great if you're able to share this recipe.
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Old 02-11-2020, 06:12 PM   #10
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My favorite is a New Orleans style Muffuletta sandwich.

The bread doesn't matter so much to me. I'm happy with a French Bread from Walmart which I often find marked down to 50 cent.

I cut the top off the loaf about 1/3 down from the top. Then with a paring knife cut around the edges about an inch or so deep and remove the center to make a bowl.

Now in fabricating this I paint the interior top and bowl with EVOO and get my cheese and meats ready to stack up. Mozzarella, Provolone, ham, salami, and a good quality green olive salad. These in that order are layered into the bread bowl.

This is rolled up in plastic wrap and then in foil to seal as tight as possible.

Next I place a 2x6 board that's about 18" long atop of the sandwich and set a couple of bricks (wrapped in foil) on top of the board as weights to press the sandwich. I let this sit for 6 hours to over night.

To serve, I open a chilled jar of Giardiniera to have with the sandwich.

This photo is an example of how you build it.

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Old 02-11-2020, 07:55 PM   #11
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Gorgeous pictures of your sandwich. It looks amazing. And it sounds very appetizing. Makes me wish I could still eat such things. The samdwich I posted at the top of this thread is only a very good memory to me, as I have to stay away from all sausages now.

Oh, and RCJoe, you are a master sandwich maker. That is obvious. I would love to see a picture of your take on my sandwich recipe. I have to think it would be spectacular.

Everyone who is still able, don't become diabetic. Don't destroy your kidneys. Live is much more challenging if you do.

I had a friend who lived his life, as he thoought, to the fullest. He never did anything in moderation, though he didn't over-indulge in alcohol. He did over-indulge in all kinds of rich. He died from diabetic complications 2 years back. He used to be a powerhouse of a man. He once raised one side of his car, with his bare hands, while I changed the tire. By age fo, he couldn't even pull back my bow (granted, it was 70 lb. pull weight with only 20% let-off). I was so tiny as a teen, and he was so powerful. Eventually, due to his lack of discipline, I became the more powerfl between us. But I too didn't watch what I ate closely enough, and eventually became diabetic myself. It took 25 years to take its toll on me. But it catches you eventually.

Keep making awesome sandwiches, and do the things you need to do to stay healthy. You might think - It doesn't matter because I plan not not live past 50 anyways. That's what my friend said. Then, he did live longer than 50, and his body was ruined by the time he was 45. He still had life to live, and couldn't. He regretted too late his lack of discipline, and short-sighted, live for the moment way of life.

I am 64 years of age, and so dream of doing exciting things with my adult children, and my grandkids. Don't know if I'll get that chance. But I'm trying to get healthy and strong again.

Sorry, just want to make sure everyone learns from my mistakes, and doesn't make them.

If anyone heeds what I have to say, then even this circumstance of my life will have been worthwhile. If my children, and grandchildren learn from my mistakes, then this part of my life will have been a blessing.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 02-12-2020, 05:22 AM   #12
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Wow, diabetes. Do take care with that Chief.

Yes I'll try your sandwich. Here in Appalachia I'll probably have to settle for regular Swiss. We are down to Kroger (Ralphs in some areas) Food Fair (a local independent) Save A Lot, and Aldi's. Our best Kroger is in the upscale neighborhood and we call it the Gucci Kroger. The others have less flattering names. But if anyone has some Emmental, they would. Kerrygold seems to be the dairy case caviar here.

As I can get some supplies together, I'll give it a try.

For a value added I'll throw in this link for ya !

Sandwich Consumption by Adults in the USA

https://www.ars.usda.gov/ARSUserFile...ption_0912.pdf
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Old 02-12-2020, 01:03 PM   #13
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I grew up on Italian subs. Italian bread (good stuff), Genoa salami, tavern ham (not sure what we got when I was a Kid), Capicola and sharp provolone. Some shredded lettuce, thin sliced tomato and thin sliced onion.

It is then dressed with oil and vinegar, S&P and oregano. This is how I remember them. I have yet to ever taste anything close to this basic sub recipe.
I have tried to duplicate and have tried to find a deli.
It must have been the ingredients and their quality that i am unable to copy.
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Old 02-12-2020, 02:13 PM   #14
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There is a hamburger place where I live called The West Pier Drive In. They are renound for their burgers, and other menu items. People visiting the Soo come back and make sure to go to West Pier. It's been around longer than I have.

The sandwich that made them famous was their cold-cut Italian sub. It cosists of bologna, salami, and ham, with slices of sweet onion, and green bell pepper, with sliced black olives, tomato, and shredded lettuce. The estimated day's sandwiches were made the night before, wrapped, and refrigerated to let the flavors come together.

The recipe hasn't changed, and it is still a great sub. It ism't as good as it was back in the day. I askrd about it and was told that the ingredient quality, especially the meats isn' available anymore.

I believe I could still make them at home, but would have to use mortadella, sopraseta, fresh, garden tmatoes, and the ham from a butcher lovated 20 miles away.

It is so sad to me that quality has been replaced by the need for ever greater monetary profit. We are satisfied with the mundane rather than being able to enjoy old-world wuality, all to save a buck. We all gwt lesser quality while the owners just keep growing richer at our expense. So, make your own sanfwiches. You can make them better than any fast-food joint, no matter what you are fed by advertizers.

Seeeeya, Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 02-12-2020, 02:16 PM   #15
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There is a hamburger place where I live called The West Pier Drive In. They are renowned for their burgers, and other menu items. People visiting the Soo come back and make sure to go to West Pier. It's been around longer than I have.

The sandwich that made them famous was their cold-cut Italian sub. It cosists of bologna, salami, and ham, with slices of sweet onion, and green bell pepper, with sliced black olives, tomato, and shredded lettuce. The estimated day's sandwiches were made the night before, wrapped, and refrigerated to let the flavors come together.

The recipe hasn't changed, and it is still a great sub. It isn't as good as it was back in the day. I askrd about it and was told that the ingredient quality, especially the meats isn' available anymore.

I believe I could still make them at home, but would have to use mortadella, sopraseta, fresh, garden tmatoes, and the ham from a butcher lovated 20 miles away.

It is so sad to me that quality has been replaced by the need for ever greater monetary profit. We are satisfied with the mundane rather than being able to enjoy old-world quality, all to save a buck. We all get lesser quality while the owners just keep growing richer at our expense. So, make your own sanfwiches. You can make them better than any fast-food joint, no matter what you are fed by advertizers.

Seeeeya, Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 02-19-2020, 11:28 AM   #16
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Thanks Chief. Well said!
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Old Yesterday, 04:41 PM   #17
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My 2 favorites are the muffaletta (nice looking sandwich - RCJoe) and hot Italian beef. I bake focaccia bread in a large cast iron skillet with olive oil, garlic and Italian seasons sprinkled on top. Cut it in half like a large bun and then layer hot sopresatta, hot capicola, provolone cheese and my homemade tapenade. The second is hot Italian beef sandwiches. I use eye of round roasts (seasoned with s&p, garlic, rosemary, Italian seasoning) and sear them on my Big Green Egg until the internal is about 115*. Wrap in foil and put in the fridge til the next day. Get out my slicer and slice thin. I keep any fat and ends for the au jus. Sautee some onions, add some red wine, then beef broth and any fat/ends from the slice. Let that cook and then add the au ju and meat together in a dutch oven or covered foil pan (depending on quantity) and cook for another 2 hours at 275*. I serve on homemade buns.
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