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Old 03-27-2020, 09:23 PM   #1
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Bread type question

At the grocery store I see French bread, Italian bread, white bread, etc. These are all white breads what’s the difference?

We’re home with the self quarantine and I’m a cooker but we have a ton of flour etc and we used to make our own bread and buns but not in awhile now. Lol, our yeast is expired so have to replace that.

I don’t want to make braided breads or anything just something for breakfast or burgers or whatever my mrs likes the full sized loaves so we do use a bread pan. Any we have white all purpose flour. What are your recommendations she likes soft and fluffy bread.

Thanks for your time

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Old 03-27-2020, 09:49 PM   #2
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If you are looking for light and fluffy loaves, add some butter or oil to them - around 4 tb to 6 c of flour - and make the dough fairly sticky, not too firm. The fat will help them store longer, as well - the usual dinner breads, like the French and Italian, usually stale faster, since they have no fat added.
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Old 03-27-2020, 10:11 PM   #3
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I've made this bread a couple of times. Perfect for sandwiches.


https://www.kingarthurflour.com/reci...h-bread-recipe
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Old 03-28-2020, 08:19 AM   #4
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I have kept my yeast in the fridge for ages - way past expiry dates. I buy in a foil bag which I divy up into an old jar of yeast. I use the jar constantly and the foil pack is sealed in a plastic zip ock with most of the air removed. Has never failed me.

In other words - don't throw out your yeast just because it is 'past BBF'.

Test it, no guarantees but you might be surprised.
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Old 03-28-2020, 09:12 AM   #5
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This is my favorite recipe for sandwich bread. It's soft, but if you want to toast it, it tastes just like English muffins.
https://www.kingarthurflour.com/reci...g-bread-recipe

I like these burger buns. After forming the dough balls, I press them down lightly, so they have a flatter shape and not so much like a dome.
https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/76739/hamburger-buns/
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Old 03-28-2020, 09:13 AM   #6
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I have kept my yeast in the fridge for ages - way past expiry dates. I buy in a foil bag which I divy up into an old jar of yeast. I use the jar constantly and the foil pack is sealed in a plastic zip ock with most of the air removed. Has never failed me.

In other words - don't throw out your yeast just because it is 'past BBF'.

Test it, no guarantees but you might be surprised.
Agree. You might need to add a little more than usual. You'll know after the first time you bake with it.
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Old 03-28-2020, 09:46 AM   #7
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And if the yeast is dead, don't throw it out. You can toast it to make it into nutritional yeast.
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Old 03-28-2020, 11:10 AM   #8
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And if the yeast is dead, don't throw it out. You can toast it to make it into nutritional yeast.
I tried that once. It all fell through the bottom of the toaster.
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Old 03-28-2020, 12:16 PM   #9
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So the grocery stores are sold out of yeast I guess we’ll try our hand at sofa bread
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Old 03-28-2020, 12:19 PM   #10
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So the grocery stores are sold out of yeast I guess we’ll try our hand at sofa bread

Do you make that lying down in the living room?
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Old 03-28-2020, 12:58 PM   #11
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When there isn't any yeast available, it's time for quick breads, like soda bread, bannock, or biscuits. They won't be as good for sandwiches, but they are still useful.
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Old 03-28-2020, 03:33 PM   #12
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When there isn't any yeast available, it's time for quick breads, like soda bread, bannock, or biscuits. They won't be as good for sandwiches, but they are still useful.
And tortillas. They don't require any raising agent at all, and you can make wraps with them.

https://www.rickbayless.com/recipe/flour-tortillas/
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Old 03-28-2020, 05:50 PM   #13
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And tortillas. They don't require any raising agent at all, and you can make wraps with them.

https://www.rickbayless.com/recipe/flour-tortillas/
Good point. Chapati too and I've never made naan, but I think it doesn't need any yeast either. Oh, and pita.
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Old 03-28-2020, 06:49 PM   #14
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I get my yeast from Amazon in 2lb bags, Red Star Active Dry yeast, https://amzn.to/3dBEqNc.

I keep it in the fridge and last me a very very long time, and compare to store bought yeast, it's only pennies.
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Old 03-28-2020, 07:54 PM   #15
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Do you make that lying down in the living room?
Lol Soda bread
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Old 03-28-2020, 07:55 PM   #16
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I have kept my yeast in the fridge for ages - way past expiry dates. I buy in a foil bag which I divy up into an old jar of yeast. I use the jar constantly and the foil pack is sealed in a plastic zip ock with most of the air removed. Has never failed me.

In other words - don't throw out your yeast just because it is 'past BBF'.

Test it, no guarantees but you might be surprised.
Lol mine expired March 2017 :(
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Old 03-28-2020, 08:02 PM   #17
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Moving things around today I found our bunt pans and my try in one of those to be kinda classy
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Old 04-01-2020, 09:23 PM   #18
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Old 04-02-2020, 12:24 AM   #19
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Kevin, I like to use my Bundt pan when I make Sally Lunn bread. It's a good sandwich bread. Nice dense crumb, moist, really good for grilled cheese or overnight French toast. Just a touch of sweet without being sweet, if that makes any sense.

https://addapinch.com/sally-lunn-bread/
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Old 04-02-2020, 03:41 AM   #20
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Depending where you live, if it is temperate enough, there are wild yeast spores floating around in the air. Simply make a thick paste of flour, water, and a bit of sugar. This is kept in a glass jar, or crock. place cheesecloth over the opening and place on a window sill. The yeast spores will make their way into the paste (slurry) and begin ot multiply. After a few days, you will have sourdough starter. The reason sourdough is sour is that the wild yeast can withstand a more acidic environment than can commercial yeast. Acid s sour.

As yeast gobbles up sugars and starches, they produce CO2 and acid. The CO2 leavens the dough, while the acid flavors the bread. So, if you can't get your hands on packets, or containers of store-bought yeast, it is naturally present in the air. Live yeast spores have even been found in the vacuum of space, alive and well.

Once your sourdough has started, you have an inexhaustible source of yeast, as long as you feed it and take care of it.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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