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Old 01-16-2020, 03:29 AM   #21
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So whole grain brown wheat would not rise as much as the more common plain wheat. but in my recipe 400g whole grain 100g white. It did rise about 50% but felt a bit heavy.

pepperhead212 Leave the white out for proving then add the white when needing it?
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Old 01-16-2020, 08:37 AM   #22
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pepperhead212 Leave the white out for proving then add the white when needing it?
No, you need to mix all the dry ingredients together first. Just hold some back when you mix it with the water and let it sit for about 15 minutes. Then add as much flour as the dough needs. It will take some practice to get a feel for the dough and when it has enough flour.
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Old 01-16-2020, 01:55 PM   #23
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So whole grain brown wheat would not rise as much as the more common plain wheat. but in my recipe 400g whole grain 100g white. It did rise about 50% but felt a bit heavy.

pepperhead212 Leave the white out for proving then add the white when needing it?
You got the right idea there, otuatail - since the white isn't slower absorbing the water, keep a cup or so out (in the recipe you posted all of it), and use that to dust the board while you knead, or add to the mixer bowl until the dough is not quite separating at the bottom of the bowl. I always do that with rye breads, when they have some white flour in them. With whole grain breads, esp. rye breads, you want to keep them sticky, otherwise, you'll get a dry, dense bread. If kneading on a board or counter, use a dough scraper to get it off the counter and your hands, to keep from adding too much flour.

You can get whole wheat bread to rise fairly well - definitely more than the 50% you describe. Next time, just rise it a little longer. Things that could cause this: not kneaded enough, so gluten wasn't developed; temperature low where making the dough, and rising; old yeast. Since you are just starting out, I doubt that the old yeast is the problem, but I know that when I get to the end of my yeast (I buy it buy the pound, and store it in a jar in the fridge), the yeast definitely gets slower (I just use a little more), and when I get a new batch, it is immediately noticeable!
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Old 01-18-2020, 12:53 AM   #24
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temperature low where making the dough

Don't know about this bit. But will keep yeast in fridge in air tight container or plastic bag with air removed.
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