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Old 06-23-2022, 09:13 AM   #21
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NYT no-knead bread has great holes, great flavor and is super easy except for timing.
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Old 06-23-2022, 10:32 AM   #22
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I've been using this recipe for years. It makes enough dough for four loaves of bread and keeps for up to two weeks in the fridge. The longer it's in the fridge, the more sourdough-like flavor it develops. You can make it into different shapes, like a boule (round), baguette (long and thin), batard (sort of oval) and rolls.

https://artisanbreadinfive.com/2013/...asics-updated/
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Old 06-23-2022, 11:04 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
If you want a loaf of bread with big holes, maybe you could try making ciabatta bread. It's got a crisp crust, big holes. Might work for you. Lots of recipe choices on Google. I have not tried any of them, so can't recommend.
I would consider ciabatta to be a recipe for someone with at least some experience making bread and it's a real workout if you don't have a stand mixer. Contrary to popular belief, it's not an old artisan Italian bread - it was invented in 1982
https://www.eater.com/2017/2/17/1462...-bread-history
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Old 06-23-2022, 11:34 AM   #24
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I did not know that, GG! I've never tried making it. My suggestion was based on having eaten and enjoyed it. Thanks for the info.
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Old 06-23-2022, 01:04 PM   #25
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Yeah, definitely looking for a look more like that. Maybe less grainy looking though. Air pockets are part of the appeal. My bread was too moist.
Better too moist than too dry! But yes, if it's too wet, it doesn't cook properly and it's hard to handle.
I aim for a stickiness that's like a post-it note. Not really sticky, just a little bit.
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Old 06-23-2022, 02:38 PM   #26
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I've been using this recipe for years. It makes enough dough for four loaves of bread and keeps for up to two weeks in the fridge. The longer it's in the fridge, the more sourdough-like flavor it develops. You can make it into different shapes, like a boule (round), baguette (long and thin), batard (sort of oval) and rolls.

https://artisanbreadinfive.com/2013/...asics-updated/
Thanks for this recipe! It's great having a versatile recipe that you can rely on.
I agree, flavour definitely improves after a long rest in the fridge.
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Old 06-23-2022, 08:51 PM   #27
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Question

GG, I'm sure you mentioned this site once before and I'd forgotten, thanks for reminding me! I'd love to try this (as always) but I have a question I'm sure you could answer.

Once the dough has collapsed, can you remove all of it and put it in a smaller container. It does say that after the initial rise, then collapse, it does not rise again.

This would be very helpful for me with limited fridge space. Finding space for one night wouldn't be a problem but for a week or so it would be. 6 liter/quarts is a big container for a tiny fridge like mine. I don't mind using my DIL's overnight or so but not for longer.
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Old 06-23-2022, 09:03 PM   #28
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GG, I'm sure you mentioned this site once before and I'd forgotten, thanks for reminding me! I'd love to try this (as always) but I have a question I'm sure you could answer.

Once the dough has collapsed, can you remove all of it and put it in a smaller container. It does say that after the initial rise, then collapse, it does not rise again.

This would be very helpful for me with limited fridge space. Finding space for one night wouldn't be a problem but for a week or so it would be. 6 liter/quarts is a big container for a tiny fridge like mine. I don't mind using my DIL's overnight or so but not for longer.
I was wondering the same thing.
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Old 06-23-2022, 10:37 PM   #29
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Yes, you can put it in a smaller container. It will collapse even more when you move it - don't worry about that, it will be fine.
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Old 06-24-2022, 06:52 AM   #30
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And we are answered.

Thanks so much GG, much appreciated. I love fresh bread but have not been making it as much as I used to. This sounds like the answer!
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Old 06-24-2022, 07:37 AM   #31
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And we are answered.



Thanks so much GG, much appreciated. I love fresh bread but have not been making it as much as I used to. This sounds like the answer!
I think you'll like it, dragn. Enjoy and let us know how it goes.
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Old Yesterday, 10:28 PM   #32
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The following recipe is from Peter Reinhart's Artisan Breads Every Day by Peter Reinhart.

Peter Reinhart:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Reinhart

https://www.amazon.com/Peter-Reinhart/e/B001H6W6I0
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Old Yesterday, 10:37 PM   #33
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Classic French Bread (Peter Reinhart)

=== Classic French Bread ===

680 grams unbleached bread flour -- (5 1/3 cups, 24 oz)
14 grams salt -- (2 teaspoons, 0.5 oz) or 1 tablespoon coarse kosher salt
7 grams instant yeast -- (2 1/4 teaspoons, 0.25 oz)
454 grams lukewarm water -- (2 cups, 16 oz) (about 95°F or 35°C)

=== Do Ahead ===

Combine all of the ingredients in a mixing bowl. If using a mixer, use the paddle attachment and mix on the lowest speed for 1 minute. If mixing by hand, use a large spoon and stir for 1 minute, until well blended and smooth. If the spoon gets too doughy, dip it in a bowl of warm water. The dough should form a coarse shaggy ball. Let it rest, uncovered, for 5 minutes.

Switch to the dough hook and mix on medium-low speed for 2 minutes or knead by hand for about 2 minutes, adjusting with flour or water as needed. The dough should be smooth, supple, and tacky but not sticky.

Whichever mixing method you use, knead the dough by hand on a lightly floured work surface for about 1 minute more, then transfer it to a clean, lightly oiled bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap, then immediately refrigerate overnight or for up to 4 days. If the dough feels too wet and sticky, do not add more flour; instead, stretch and fold it one or more times at 10 minute intervals, before putting it in the refrigerator. (If you plan to bake the dough in batches over different days, you can portion the dough and place it into two or more oiled bowls at this stage.)

On Baking Day ===

Remove the dough from the refrigerator about 2 hours before you plan to bake. Gently transfer it to a lightly floured work surface, taking care to degas it as little as possible. For baguettes and bātards, divide the cold dough into 10 ounce (283 g) pieces; for 1 pound boules, divide the dough into 19 ounce (53 g) pieces; and for freestanding loaves, use whatever size you prefer.

Form the dough into bātards and/or baguettes (see pages 21 and 22) or boules. Mist the top of the dough with spray oil, loosely cover with plastic wrap, and proof at room temperature for about 1 1/2 hours, until increased to 1 1/2 times its original size.

About 45 minutes before baking, preheat the oven to 550°F (288°C) or as high as it will go, and prepare the oven for hearth baking. (=== Hearth Baking ===)

Remove the plastic wrap from the dough 15 minutes prior to baking; if using proofing molds, transfer the dough onto a floured peel.

Just prior to baking, score the dough 1/2 inch deep with a serrated knife or razor. Transfer the dough to the oven, pour 1 cup of hot water into the steam pan, then lower the oven temperature to 450°F (232°C).

Bake for 12 minutes, then rotate the pan and bake for another 15 to 25 minutes, until the crust is a rich golden brown, the loaves sound hollow when thumped, and the internal temperature is about 200°F (93°C) in the center. For a crisper crust, turn off the oven and leave the bread in for another 5 minutes before removing.

Cool the bread on a wire rack for at least 45 minutes before slicing or serving.

=== Variation ===

By simply varying the method so that the shaped loaves undergo cold fermentation, rather than the freshly mixed bulk dough, you can create a spectacular loaf with a distinctive blistered crust. After the dough is mixed and placed in a clean, oiled bowl, let it rise at room temperature for about 90 minutes, until doubled in size.

Divide and shape as described above, mist with spray oil, then cover the shaped dough loosely with plastic wrap and refrigerate it overnight, away from anything that might fall on it or restrict it from growing.

The next day, remove the dough from the refrigerator 1 hour before baking. It should have grown to at least 1 1/2 times its original size. Prepare the oven for hearth baking. While the oven is heating, remove the plastic wrap and let the dough sit uncovered for 10 minutes. Score the dough while it's still cold, then bake as described above.

Notes:

This version of French bread is the simplest formula in the book. It uses the cold fermentation technique, and the resulting dough actually holds the shape and cuts of conventional French baguettes, bātards, and boules better than the lean dough, which is wetter. Because the dough isn't as wet, it's especially important to handle it with a firm but light touch. Too much pressure will squeeze out the gas trapped during the overnight rise, resulting in small, even holes rather than the prized large, irregular holes. I've also included a variation that makes spectacular loaves with a distinctive blistered crust.

=== Hearth Baking ===

A number of the breads in this book are designed to be baked at high temperatures, preferably on a hearth of some type. A baking stone is the most popular version for home hearth baking, but not everyone has one. In addition, a hearth surface, which is basically a thermal mass designed to absorb heat and then radiate it back into the dough, isn't enough if you want to achieve bakery-quality products. You also need steam to enhance oven spring and put a shiny, crackly crust on the bread.

Baking Stones.

I prefer the thick, rectangular stones now available in most houseware departments or kitchen supply stores. These stones retain their heat longer than thin, round pizza stones. The unglazed quarry tiles that many of us used before baking stones became widely available are also good, though they tend to slide around and are more prone to cracking when they get wet. If you've already outfitted your oven with tiles and are happy with them, feel free to continue using them.

If you don't have a baking stone, it's perfectly okay to bake on a sheet pan. The oven spring may not be as great, but at Brother Juniper's Bakery I baked my French bread on sheet pans in a convection oven for many years, and my customers loved it. Whatever works!

Creating Steam.

There are many ways to create a blast of steam, including water misters and ice cubes on the oven floor, but my preferred method is to use a steam pan, either a sheet pan with a 1-inch rim or, as one of my recipe testers suggests, a lasagna pan with taller sides, or a cast-iron frying pan. Shirley Corriher, whose book BakeWise is one of my favorites, suggests putting stones in the steam pan to create more hot surfaces on which water can be instantly transformed into steam.

Both the steam pan and the baking stone should be preheated for at least 45 minutes so that they'll absorb enough heat. The location of the stone and the pan depends on the style and size of the oven. It's fine if the steam pan is above the baking stone, but in my oven it works best to place it on the shelf under the baking stone. Always use an oven mitt or a hot pad and wear long sleeves when adding water to the hot steam pan to prevent steam burns. It's also advisable to cover oven windows with a dry dish towel or rag to prevent backsplash from hitting the window and cracking it-but remember to remove the towel before closing the oven door! I use a watering can with a long spout when pouring the water into the steam pan because it gives me a little separation from the steam.

Why not use ice cubes? They do work and last longer than water, but you only need steam for about 5 minutes; after that it has done its job and it's better to let the oven dry out. Too much moisture in the oven after the steam phase delays caramelization of the crust, making it thicker and chewier. But another reason why I eschew ice cubes is that they drain heat from the oven. The caloric conversion for turning ice into steam is much greater than that for turning hot water into steam. Still, if you like the ice cube method, be my guest. Once again, whatever works!

To prepare your oven for hearth baking, preheat the oven with a baking stone and steam pan in place. Slide the shaped dough onto the preheated baking stone, then lay a kitchen towel over the oven's glass window to protect it from any potential backsplash. Wearing an oven mitt to prevent burns, pour about 1 cup of hot water into the preheated steam pan. I like using a watering can because of the control and distance the spout provides. Using a spray bottle such as a plant mister, you can also spritz the oven walls a couple of times to create additional steam.

Source: Peter Reinhart's Artisan Breads Every Day by Peter Reinhart.

Yield: 2 large loaves, 4 small loaves or many rolls.

Source: "Peter Reinhart's Artisan Breads Every Day by Peter Reinhart"
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