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Old 03-07-2011, 03:59 PM   #1
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The World's Easiest Breakfast Rolls

Bolas found this recipe on my Danish cooking site: Absolut verdens nemmeste morgenmadsboller med billede fra Alletiders Kogebog

I modified it, because I only use whole grains.

Makes 8-12 rolls, depending on how big you want them.
  • 2 tsps active dry yeast (original recipe called for 25 grams of cake yeast)
  • 2 tsps salt
  • 1/2 tsp sugar
  • 5 dl (decilitres) water
  • 600 grams hard (bread) whole grain wheat flour (original recipe called for 200 grams durum flour and 400 grams flour)

Use a bowl that will be large enough for the dough to more than double in size. A bowl with a tight fitting lid is ideal. I used plastic wrap as a lid.
  1. Put the cold water in the bowl and stir in the sugar.
  2. Sprinkle the dry yeast on the water and let it hydrate.
  3. Stir until the yeast is completely dissolved.
  4. Stir in 200 grams of the flour and the salt(original recipe said to stir in the durum flour).
  5. Stir in the rest of the flour.
  6. Put the lid on the bowl and put in the fridge overnight.

The dough will be very sticky.

Next morning:
  1. Preheat oven to 250 C (483 F).
  2. Using one or two spoons, put blobs of dough on a baking sheet. Don't knead the dough. Try to leave as much air in the dough as possible.
  3. Bake for 15-20 minutes

It was recommended (in the comments) to dip the spoon(s) in water.

I made half the recipe.






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Old 03-07-2011, 04:09 PM   #2
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They were quite tasty, but dense.

I added more water, because the dough was quite stiff and didn't resemble the picture on the website. I also remembered that whole wheat flour absorbs more water. I added 100 ml (1 dl), but should probably only have added 50 ml. I also accidentally used 2 tsps of yeast, instead of the 1 tsp that would have been the amount for half the recipe.

I took them out after 15 minutes. They sounded hollow when I knocked on the bottom of one. They weren't quite done in the middle. I put them back in the oven for 7 minutes at 400 F. I'll probably use a thermometer next time.

The rolls were very crusty. I might brush milk on them next time. with softer crusts, these would make good hamburger buns.

I will be tweaking this recipe. Maybe use lukewarm water, instead of cold. Maybe take the dough out of the fridge half an hour before baking.

Any other suggestions?
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Old 03-07-2011, 04:40 PM   #3
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If you use cake yeast, the instructions for adding the yeast are a little different. According to the original recipe:

Put the yeast, sugar, and salt in the bowl (before anything else).
Stir until it becomes liquid.
Then add the water and continue from there.
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Old 03-08-2011, 05:49 AM   #4
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Defer addition of salt until enough flour has been added to bring the dough to the consistency of a thick pancake batter and the yeast has had an hour to work; then add balance of flour. Let dough rise at room temp for 2 hours and deflate before refrigerating. 'Form' the rolls with cold dough because it is easier to handle. Let formed dough sit as room temperature for 1/2 hour before baking.
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Old 03-08-2011, 10:54 AM   #5
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Bill mate if you clic on the link in Taxes first post then run your translator, scroll down to the comments you will see some comment that are funny and not as pleasant as your comment on yeast and salt
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Old 03-08-2011, 02:00 PM   #6
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Me - 2010-02-06 10:29:30
Hvis du tilsætter salt sammen med gær ødelægger du gær cellerne og gør gæret ubrugtbar.
If you add salt with yeast destroys you yeast cells and makes fermented ubrugtbar.
så nej.
so no.
rør gær sammen med vand og så kom de andre tørre tingene ingredienser i.
stir yeast with water and then came the other dry ingredients things in.
ubrugtbar = unused (unusable?) ferment.
Perhaps instant yeast is more robust?
Salt is a dandy preservative which wards off the growth of most all nonmarine flora.
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Old 03-08-2011, 03:32 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
Defer addition of salt until enough flour has been added to bring the dough to the consistency of a thick pancake batter and the yeast has had an hour to work; then add balance of flour. Let dough rise at room temp for 2 hours and deflate before refrigerating. 'Form' the rolls with cold dough because it is easier to handle. Let formed dough sit as room temperature for 1/2 hour before baking.
Thanks Bill. I will try those separately first and maybe in combination afterwards. It was mentioned in the comments that letting the dough warm up gives it a chance to flatten out. I'm not too worried about the shape of the rolls yet.
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Old 03-08-2011, 03:33 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
Me - 2010-02-06 10:29:30
Hvis du tilsætter salt sammen med gær ødelægger du gær cellerne og gør gæret ubrugtbar.
If you add salt with yeast destroys you yeast cells and makes fermented ubrugtbar.
så nej.
so no.
rør gær sammen med vand og så kom de andre tørre tingene ingredienser i.
stir yeast with water and then came the other dry ingredients things in.
ubrugtbar = unused (unusable?) ferment.
Perhaps instant yeast is more robust?
Salt is a dandy preservative which wards off the growth of most all nonmarine flora.
ubrugbart was spelled wrong, that's why it didn't get translated. Yes, it means unusable. Ferment should have been translated as yeast. Danes seem to make as many typos and spelling errors, when posting on line, as the rest of us.
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Old 03-08-2011, 03:42 PM   #9
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Was that white line at the bottom of your sliced roll whole wheat flour? It seems a shame you're not interested in using Durum flour.
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Old 03-08-2011, 03:46 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolas De Fraile View Post
Bill mate if you clic on the link in Taxes first post then run your translator, scroll down to the comments you will see some comment that are funny and not as pleasant as your comment on yeast and salt
My favourite was:

We put the rolls in cold oven: 30 min v / 225 degrees - so you can whack balls at the plate, wake the kids and go to the bathroom together.

from:

Vi sætter bollerne i kold ovn: 30 min v/ 225 grader - så kan man smække bollerne på pladen, vække ungerne og gå i bad samtidig.

Should read: We put the rolls in a cold oven: 30 min at 225 degrees - then you can toss the rolls onto the baking sheet, wake the children and take a bath - all at once.

No whacking balls at plates. No going to the bathroom together. Just taking a bath while the rolls are in the oven.

I read the translation to my DH and he said, "Oh, let's not do that." I'm still giggling.
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Old 03-08-2011, 05:27 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
Was that white line at the bottom of your sliced roll whole wheat flour? It seems a shame you're not interested in using Durum flour.
I'm not sure why there was a white line at the bottom of the sliced roll. I don't understand what you mean when you ask if it was whole wheat flour. The rolls were made with 100% whole grain wheat flour. Maybe the line is there because I stuck the bread back in the oven 'cause it wasn't done in the middle on the first try?

It's not that I don't have any interest in using Durum flour. I just haven't found it. What I usually buy for bread is the second one* on this page (it's in English): Meunerie Milanaise - Farines biologiques moulues sur pierre. I see that that company has whole durum flour, but I haven't seen it. Is it worth asking for?

*elsewhere on that site, they say that "integral" means they get 100 grams of flour out of 100 grams of grain.
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Old 03-08-2011, 05:38 PM   #12
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While King Arthur (KA) is quite pricey you might want to read their description of their durum as opposed to their semolina flour. Their durum even smells good.
You might also find the following to be of interest-
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winter_wheat
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Old 03-08-2011, 06:12 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
While King Arthur (KA) is quite pricey you might want to read their description of their durum as opposed to their semolina flour. Their durum even smells good.
You might also find the following to be of interest-
Winter wheat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
King Arthur is a U.S. company. I don't want to bother trying to order from them and have to deal with customs. Is their durum flour whole grain? If it is, I will look for it if we drive down to Vermont.

I like whole grains and don't much like bread without the bran. There is usually a way to make it work with whole grain. I make whole grain sponge cake. I just use soft whole grain wheat flour.
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Old 03-09-2011, 04:06 AM   #14
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From-
The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan | Details

The second species of wheat (Triticum durum) grown in Saskatchewan is represented by one market type, the Canada Western Amber Durum (CWAD) class. Durum wheat production in Saskatchewan was initiated in the 1920s and has grown to be the second most widely produced wheat in Canada. The area seeded to CWAD wheat in Saskatchewan averaged 1,879,892 ha between 1998 and 2002. Saskatchewan accounts for roughly 83% of Canadian durum wheat production, which is concentrated in the traditionally lower-rainfall portions of the province, the brown and dark brown soil zones. Durum wheat typically has a protein level similar to that of CWRS wheat; it is used in the manufacture of pasta, bulgur, couscous, and bread. Within the last five years a subtype of CWAD durum has been introduced: the Extra Strong CWAD subclass addresses a preference for very strong gluten durum types in the Italian market. It is anticipated that up to 15% of CWAD production in Saskatchewan could shift to this ES type once more varieties are in place.

Over the last twenty years, common wheat production in Saskatchewan has declined by 37% while the durum wheat area has increased by 13%. This change in production reflects higher returns for durum and continuing low prices for bread wheat, as a result of hefty subsidies for wheat production and export enhancement in the EU and the USA, relative to Canada.

Pierre Hucl

KAF durum is not whole grain. To our taste, breads containing whole grain seem to be more palatable when made with a dough that contains no more than 50% whole grain flour. We prefer bread made from hard wheat to that made from cake-like soft wheat. A notable problem with many whole grain flours is their higher propensity for rancidification.
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Old 03-11-2011, 10:39 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
From-
The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan | Details

...

KAF durum is not whole grain. To our taste, breads containing whole grain seem to be more palatable when made with a dough that contains no more than 50% whole grain flour. We prefer bread made from hard wheat to that made from cake-like soft wheat. A notable problem with many whole grain flours is their higher propensity for rancidification.
Interesting info.

I use soft flour when making sponge cake, not bread. Whole grain flour doesn't get a chance to go rancid at my house Well, I bought soft flour and put it in the freezer. The soft flour doesn't get used nearly as often as the hard one. I don't bother to buy all purpose. I got used to having two kinds when I couldn't get all purpose whole grain flour.

I've eaten whole grain bread my entire life. I'll bet you would enjoy the 100% whole rye (rugbrød) they make in Denmark, even though you might not want to eat it every day.
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Old 03-15-2011, 01:18 PM   #16
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Baked a whole wheat, durum, bread flour blend 550 gram free form loaf with a black sesame seed topping early this morning(0500) at 425F for 1 hour. By 0900 we only had a 65 gram heel left uneaten. The bulk of 1+#'s was consumed with sweet butter and a few slices schmeared with goose liverwurst. Shoulda took few pics before we only had the heel left.
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Old 03-15-2011, 05:52 PM   #17
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Bill, that looks really yummy (but a bit pale for my taste ).

How would you compare the taste of black sesame seeds to the pale ones? I have never tried the black ones.
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Old 03-15-2011, 05:56 PM   #18
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Black ones seem nuttier and less prone to going rancid.
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