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Old 07-31-2021, 07:54 AM   #1
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Sourbread

Hi. Never made sourbread and was amazed that it can take up to a week to make. I have looked at a recipe on line and I am confused over two parts of it.


https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/s..._starter_22976


Method part 4
Remove half of the starter and discard. WHY?


Method part 5
You may have to discard some of the starter so that you do not end up with too much. WHY?


Recipe Tips states that you can freeze some of your starter so why waste all this starter. Can anyone shead any light on this please?


Desmond.

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Old 07-31-2021, 09:51 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otuatail View Post
Hi. Never made sourbread and was amazed that it can take up to a week to make. I have looked at a recipe on line and I am confused over two parts of it.


https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/s..._starter_22976


Method part 4
Remove half of the starter and discard. WHY?


Method part 5
You may have to discard some of the starter so that you do not end up with too much. WHY?...
Simply so you don't have more than you need to make a loaf of bread. You could start with a bigger container and make an extra large batch then freeze the portion you don't use. You'd have to complete the entire process before dividing and freezing rather than doing it in STEP FOUR.
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Old 07-31-2021, 10:03 AM   #3
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There are ways to use sourdough discard, but people still often have more than they need.
https://food52.com/blog/26178-sourdough-discard-recipes
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Old 07-31-2021, 12:13 PM   #4
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What it looks to me is if I do not throw any away I will have a lot of starter. This is not the ingredents for a bread, this is just like buying yeast and adding it to the bread mix. Acording to this recipie it is only making a starter.



Later onj you will use some of this into making some bread.


There is another part to this and that is a recipe for making sourdough bread
https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/h...ourdough_08213


In this recipie there is a link to this recipe to make the starter ONLY.
Are you saying I should ignore this second link have just added?

The first link [I started with] here is only to make a starter.
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Old 07-31-2021, 03:33 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otuatail View Post
What it looks to me is if I do not throw any away I will have a lot of starter. This is not the ingredents for a bread, this is just like buying yeast and adding it to the bread mix. Acording to this recipie it is only making a starter.

Later onj you will use some of this into making some bread.

There is another part to this and that is a recipe for making sourdough bread
https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/h...ourdough_08213

In this recipie there is a link to this recipe to make the starter ONLY.
Are you saying I should ignore this second link have just added?

The first link [I started with] here is only to make a starter.
No, you can make bread with the starter anytime after the first six days. If you keep the starter on the counter, it will grow faster because of the warmth in the kitchen. You can keep it in the fridge instead and it will grow more slowly. It just depends on how often you want to make bread or other baked goods with it.
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Old 07-31-2021, 03:53 PM   #6
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I keep it in a plastic tub in the refrigerator, with a loose top. Take it put the evening before baking and feed it with flour and warm water. By next morning, it's bubbling. I take what I need for the day's cookery, then feed it and leave it on the counter 'til it bubbles some more. Then it goes back in the fridge.

Beside sourdough bread, I also use it for ciabatta, drop biscuits, sandwich rolls, pancakes, and waffles.









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Old 07-31-2021, 04:31 PM   #7
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One of these days I am going to try making some sourdough and baking bread with it. I will follow the instructions from Bake with Jack.



and



And here's the link to the recipe for the bread: https://www.bakewithjack.co.uk/blog-...-for-beginners
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Old 07-31-2021, 04:53 PM   #8
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otuatail Sorry I didn't post earlier. I should have, as I've been trying sourdough since I started baking bread in the 70s. Unfortunately, I've had mixed results - some weren't as flavorful as a good yeast bread, while some were so sour that about all I could eat them with was braunschweiger, or a similarly strong meat! I found out, later on, that temperature was the key, but even that wasn't working that well, as one of the key temperatures - that during a long wait for the dough, usually overnight in the refrigerator, is ideally done at a warmer temperature than our refrigerators! If you have a fridge that you cure cheese in, that would work well, but not many of us have this! And besides this, there's that problem of needing to use the started very often, otherwise, it gets "stagnant", so to speak, even in the fridge, needing "refreshing". And you can't really use that discard, unless you need the alcohol for something! Simply put, I couldn't use it often enough, and ended up wasting too much.

However, in shortly after 2000 (I think that's when the book came out?) I discovered something in ArtisanBaking Across America, by Maggie Glezer that was better than any sourdough I had ever tried - Firm Sourdough Starter! Amazingly, when I googled "firm sourdough starter", a link to a post on thefreshloaf.com came up, with a reference to her recipe! Here it is:
https://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23...-glezer-recipe

This type of starter is also referred to as a levain - the French term for this. One good thing about this is that you don't make much of it, and don't need much. And it can sit in the fridge for months, and you just refresh it with a small amount, a couple of times, and it's good as new! I only had it "die" once in my fridge, and I just made it again, with the rye flour.

Usually the sourness is somewhat mild, but very good. However, to make it like the SF sourdough, the key is to rise it at a fairly high temperature - not something I would have guessed! Here's one of the posts on thefreshloaf.com, showing the method:
https://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/26...u-bros-formula

The firm starter I keep in the fridge has a label on it for refreshing - 10 g starter, 25 g non-chlorinated water, 45 g bread flour. Just mix together, and roll it in your hands - it's sort of dry, at first, but eventually comes together. Then just put it back in the jar, and the ball should double in 8 hours; if it's been a long time since using it, a second refreshing will probably be needed. I often do it with half the amount, when it's been several months, so I don't waste as much, and it's back to normal after 3 refreshments.
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Old 08-01-2021, 05:22 PM   #9
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Lately, I've been using both sourdough starter and instant yeast, which yields a fast-rising dough with even texture (no big bubbles) and a crumb that's open enough to take spreads or dips well.

Here's today's batch of sandwich rolls with one baguette, that I was going to try in the solar cooker, but the clouds rolled in.

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Old 08-02-2021, 12:51 PM   #10
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Hi pepperhead. What does this mean?
"If you have a fridge that you cure cheese in, that would work well"
Never heard of this. What temperature are you talking about? I have heard that you can freeze starter and keep for ages.
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Old 08-02-2021, 01:03 PM   #11
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Hi otuatail, That's a higher temp. than a regular regular fridge - 50°, or a little more.

I've also tried the freezing; also drying, both of which require a lot of time, and similar numbers of refreshments, to use the stuff. So why bother, I asked? I could make bread with yeast, rising it multiple times, over 2 or 3 days, with little effort, and know that I'd get a delicious bread, while that was never a sure thing. Until I found the firm started, I had sort of given up on it.
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